Connect with us

Film

13 Movie One Piece has Debuted: Every Movie is a Super Product!

Published

on

One Piece is one of the extremely popular animated films for young people. It can be said, One Piece is a classic movie. From 2000 to 2018, 13 episodes of One Piece were released. Do you remember which are episodes? Join us in reviewing these 13 episodes!

One Piece is a good animated film and is directed by a well-known production team. There are so many fans waiting for the One Piece episodes to be born. From 2000 to 2018, this animated film has been released 13 parts. In addition to the 8th episode and the 9th episode, each episode has improved in content and image quality. Before welcoming the next part, let’s review the 13 movies One Piece once broadcast before.

One Piece: The Movie

One Piece: The Movie is produced based on the context of Arc Village Syrup (Usopp Debut), before Arc Baratie. The content of this part is mainly about a person who holds 1/3 of the world’s gold. This character hides gold in an island. After this confidential information was published, this amount of gold was the target of many pirates. In the movie, the main character is a young pirate named Monkey D. Luffy. The discovery of the treasure caused Monkey D. Luffy to become the pirate king. In this part, Luffy was starved to death and another character wanted to stealth his treasure. While searching for the treasure, Luffy’s group meets Tabio, who is captured by a pirate called El Drago. El Drago is also looking for that mysterious treasure.

The first part of the movie has started the next series of One Piece Tube

Clockwork Island Adventure

Following the content of Part 1 One Piece, Part 2 One Piece has the main content related to the process of finding treasure of a series of new fleets. The new fleets that appear in this section are MR, Trump. The characters who appear and participate in Part 2 of the movie One Piece are Merry, Captain Bear King, Nami…

The battles between fleets always make viewers feel attractive. The episodes of this section have attracted many viewers.

The number of fans of this movie also increased rapidly

Chopper’s Kingdom on the Island of Strange Animals

In part 3, One Piece makes viewers unable to take their eyes off the screen because of the battle for finding mysterious treasure. The fleet is approaching the huge treasure. After overcoming many challenges, fleets reached the Crown Island and continued to fight. In this part, Chopper – A new character is lost and suddenly becomes the king of that island.

Dead End Adventure

Dead End Adventure has equally interesting content compared to other parts of this animation. In part 4 of the movie One Piece, due to out of money, BMR have to participate in the exciting race. This race is a secret between Pirate team, called Dead End Competition. Here, all privates must fight against the very strong, like the new pirate captain – Captain Gasparde.

Dead End Adventure is the fourth part of the entire One Piece film series

The Cursed Holy Sword

The journey to find treasure is no longer simply finding treasure. Now, every journey to find treasure has been mixed with fierce battles of fleets. The evolution of part 5 was mainly on Asuka island. On this island, BMR is looking for Shichiseiken – the world’s most beautiful and valuable sword, even though it contains a scary curse.

However, when the fleet returned to the ship, they figured that Zoro – who was in charge of the ship, was lost. However, the fleet was unable to search for Zoro right away due to the ambush of the Navy and they had to sail immediately. When the boat has docked at another place, the group enters a village where the Seven Stars sword is sealed. The group is attacked again by the Navy and strangely Zoro appeared in the navy.

The secrets of series One Piece have been revealed

Baron Omatsuri and the Secret Island (March 5, 2005)

Part 6 of the One Piece animation movie has the main content about Luffy character. After receiving a mysterious invitation from Omatsuri Island, Luffy’s group was unable to refuse. When he came here, the landlord had a trial and Luffy immediately agreed, but he suspected that these were hellish challenges that made him lose each member. Luffy will have to think of a way to handle this.

The Giant Mechanical Soldier of Karakuri Castle

In part 7 of the One Piece animation film, the producer is set in front of the Water 7 Arc. At that time, BMR picked up the treasure from a shipwreck. Open BMR’s box and see an old lady. Nami was disappointed and proved extremely scary. When old lady saw Nami, she revealed that if Nami took her back to her home, she would give a large treasure to Nami.

On the island – This old lady’s house is full of interesting inventions and surreal mysteries

Episode of Alabasta and Episode of Chopper Plus

In 13 part of One Piece, Episode of Alabasta and Episode of Chopper Plus are the two most poor episodes. In these two parts, the producers created animated effects like Manganese/Anime and many fans reacted negatively to these two parts. While the content of Part 8 – Episode of Alabasta is primarily about the process of BMR going to Alabasta and fighting Crocodile, the content of Part 9 – Episode of Chopper Plus is the story of Chopper from the beginning until he joins BMR.

One Piece Film: Strong World (12/12/2009)

One Piece: Strong World is the best movie of the entire broadcast time. This is an important milestone for the One Piece Movie series because since this episode Oda has officially participated in the film production process.

In addition, when watching movies, you will be given a special Vol.0 book

Movie content is quite familiar. The story begins with the character Golden Leo – Shiki. Shiki is a great pirate comparable to Roger – the Pirate King. Throughout his life, Shiki always likes to do great and scary things. Shiki and Roger have experienced many horrific matches before Roger surrendered to the navy. When he found that Roger was arrested, Shiki is extremely angry and thinks that only he can kill Roger. In anger, Shiki went to the naval base alone, killing countless soldiers to find Roger.

Here, Shiki met Garp – Luffy’s grandfather, the legendary vice Admiral of the navy and Sengokou – who became the dominant Admiral of the entire naval force later. However, that’s just a story 20 years ago.

20 years later everything happened in a completely different direction

One Piece 3D: Straw Hat Chase

Straw Hat Chase is One Piece’s first 3D CGI movie. The film tells about the journey to find Hat Chase that Luffy loved very much. Luffy struggled to find Hat Chase so much that he got lost in the center of the Navy. This film is very short, the duration of the movie only lasts for 30 minutes.

One Piece Film: Z

The story is about a weapon that is said to be on par with the Ancient Weapon. It was taken away by a man who was both powerful and scary – Z in order to make an extremely dangerous ploy. The Navy immediately dispatched Admiral Aokiji to find Z. Luffy and the group also had to fight Z to stop this plot.

One Piece Film: Z continues to be a film led by Oda

One Piece: Gold

Of course, One Piece: Gold was still directly produced by Oda. In this film, Pirates will have to confront Gold’s Tesoro Guild – the owner of Gran Tesoro (Gran Tesoro is the world’s largest gold entertainment city).

Gran Tesoro is an independent city, bringing together hundreds of players and pirates around the world. This is a place where government cannot control it. The Tesoro Guild dominated everything, even pirates or government. Human ambition is getting bigger. The world balance of power began to change from here!

One Piece: Gold is a movie that many fans in Vietnam know because this is the first One Piece movie to be released in Vietnam

One Piece has released 13 parts. There is a special thing we want to share with you. In the summer of 2019 we will be watched the 14th One Piece animation film. This information has been officially announced recently. Fans will have to wait a little. Over 13 episodes, One Piece has become an immortal and indispensable film for the lives of many young people.

Celebrity

In “Back to Black,” Star Marisa Abela Turns in An Uncanny Performance as Amy Winehouse in The Sam Taylor-Johnson Biopic

Published

on

Evoking classic R&B, the late Amy Winehouse emerged as a celebrated new stars by making old music sound fresh. She possessed a deeply soulful voice which she used to sing songs of love, heartbreak, and struggles with substance abuse, as in her Top-10 hit “Rehab.” Winehouse sold 16 million copies of the LP Back to Black” and won big at the 2008 Grammy Awards, taking home Song of the Year, Record of the Year, and Best New Artist. All that success was overshadowed by the Brit’s personal troubles, which, according to MTV News, included an arrest for drug possession — there was a viral video of the singer smoking what was reportedly crack cocaine — and an emphysema diagnosis.

Winehouse’s demons tragically got the best of her. According to The Guardian, authorities were summoned to the singer’s north London home in July 2011, where they found her dead at the scene. Winehouse was reportedly a heroin user, but a post mortem inquest pinpointed a different cause of death. According to “The Independent”, a London coroner found no drugs in her system, ruling that the singer died of alcohol poisoning following a period of three weeks of sobriety. Winehouse is believed to have consumed 416 milligrams of alcohol per deciliter of blood, well over a fatal level of 350 milligrams. She was 27 years old.

This complicated history has been fodder for articles, books, a notable documentary and now a feature film, “Back to Black”. The movie’s title is taken from the hot album of the same name. Directed by 57-year-old Sam Taylor-Johnson, her feature film debut was 2009’s “Nowhere Boy,” based on the Beatles’ singer/songwriter John Lennon’s childhood experiences.

Taylor-Johnson’s star for “Back to Black,” Marisa Abela, made her TV debut in 2020 with leads in the Sky One political thriller, “COBRA” and the BBC Two/ HBO office drama, “Industry.”  Abela appeared in the 2022 films, “She Is Love” and “Rogue Agent.” In July 2022, she joined the cast of Greta Gerwig’s “Barbie” (2023). Then the actress starred as Winehouse in this biopic.

This Q&A comes from an appearance made by the duo at the Museum of The Moving Image shortly before the film’s May 17th release.

T2C: This is a remarkable story and one that, in some ways, is privy to when she was alive. For each of you, what moved the dial from this is a remarkable story to this is a remarkable story that I need to tell?

Sam Taylor-Johnson:

Sam Taylor-Johnson: When Alison Owen, our producer, called me and said, “I’m looking to make the story of Amy Winehouse, which would be interesting,” I felt like I couldn’t say “Yes” quick enough. After I said so, I suddenly processed the enormity of what I was taking on. It felt like it had to be made from [Amy’s] perspective because, by living in London around the time when she was alive, I watched how her life was dissected and pulled apart in the tabloids and similarly post-death. I felt like going directly into her perspective. It was almost like allowing her to tell her own story through her words and her lyrics. It felt like a timely thing to do.

Marisa Abela

Marisa Abela: Basically, I got a call from my agent who said they’re doing it. I was about 13 when “Back to Black” came out, so I was aware of her music. I was singing the songs, but when you’re singing “Love Is A Losing Game” and you’re 13 years old, it doesn’t mean that you really understood it fully. That was my understanding of Amy [at the time]. Then, because of all of the tabloids and the images and stuff, I knew of her in that way. So, I said, “Let me think about it.” I was then in front of Sam Taylor-Johnson and Nina Gold, an amazing casting director in London. I knew they were being quite specific about who they were seeing, so I just didn’t want to make a fool of myself, essentially.

Then I started watching footage, the documentary, interviews about her life – things that really were quite telling [about] who she was as a person. There was just this thing about her and that carried me through the entire process I was watching. And there was this magnetism, this intensity, this deep well of feeling, emotions and intensity, that I was so drawn to. I felt that we’d drawn from Amy, herself. It was all there in her music. And for the people who still listened to her music often, this is for them. In the narrative around her life and death, I felt that what we’d lost really came through, but it seems like there’s a double-edged sword here.

T2C: There’s so much media and coverage, so many perspectives to sort through. Talk a bit more about your process and how you blocked out the noise and chose to privilege us with her perspective with what was there?

Sam Taylor-Johnson: It was important from the beginning to just block out the noise. There was a lot, especially when we were filming, and it became louder and louder. The louder it became, the more determined I was to just keep driving forward with it through her eyes and to uphold her. Our press are quite famous for pulling down anything that might seem to be successful in any way. It felt like those voices saying we need to protect her legacy were also the ones who pulled her apart during her lifetime. That emboldened me in a way to shut those voices out. The decision around how and what sort of film was going to be quite quickly came into place.

When I sat down with Matt Greenhalgh, who wrote the movie, I said, “If we are going through her workstyle perspective, with “Frank” and then “Back to Black,” obviously those are the keys to this film. “Back to Black” really is a love story and tells us everything within it. It became our framework. I knew that that was difficult for a lot of people who had a lot of opinions and judgments. I felt like her declaration of love and the power of that love was important to uphold in order to understand the creative journey of “Back to Black. In a way, we went into her perspective saying, she loved her father and she loved Blake: therefore, that’s our view. We still see some of the things that are highlighted in the documentary that people feel strongly about. They’re still part of our film, but they’re not seen through the lens of judgment. It was quite freeing to stay in her shoes on that journey.

T2C: This being a love story, you think immediately of romantic love. But the relationships that I was most struck by were those she had with her family. Talk a bit about choosing actors and having them light up those roles?

Sam Taylor-Johnson: With her Jewish grandmother, it was clear — during the research and hearing the stories from the family and others — that she was so much a part of the fabric of who Amy was, through Grandma Cynthia’s style and love of jazz and music. So it felt like, “Okay, this is worth going further into and strengthening that relationship.”  But when I went to Lesley [Manville] initially, she said, “Oh, I don’t know if there’s enough on the page for me.” I said, “Look at it like this is the fabric of Amy.” Once Lesley came on board, we then wrote more scenes because she was just so exceptional. We just honed in on those relationships that we felt were really important to the narrative of this story. Obviously, within — I don’t know how many minutes it was, I’ve forgotten — so much had to be dropped by the wayside. For me, as a storyteller, I have to just find my path. The Winehouses — Cynthia, Mitch, and Janis — plus husband Blake were on a path.

T2C: Talk a bit more about the music. Obviously there’s a great blueprint here. Did you have to make difficult decisions about what songs were included?

Sam Taylor-Johnson: I’ll start, but I want Marisa to take over on this because I’m talking too much. What I had quite early on was one of her playlists. On that playlist were The Specials and Minnie Riperton. It was quite a gift to have that. Amazingly, of all the things that were written that weren’t Amy’s music, we managed to have access to it. But when I started the movie, I had all the music rights from Sony and Universal. I didn’t have to have approval for anybody. I could just make the movie I wanted to make. Matt wrote very specifically for the songs, almost like it’s a musical in the sense that it belonged to the narrative structure. You couldn’t choose “Love Is a Losing Game” and switch it with “Stronger Than Me.” It really was laid out that way.

I’ll let Marisa come into this because I just want to say, when I met Marisa for the audition, she said, I remember, “What about singing? I’m not a singer.” But Marisa sang that entire movie. Every song you hear. So from the position of declaring she couldn’t sing, what you saw is very contrary to that. Okay, you can talk about that…

Marisa Abela: I think what became clear was, as I was reading the script more and more, and watching more and more footage of Amy, was that these albums are so iconic and incredible from a songwriting perspective as well as a musical one. But what was so incredible about the performances I was watching was that they were completely different every single time. If she was in a bad mood – and she was often in a really, really bad mood – you wouldn’t get half the song from her. If she was in a great mood, she was singing all over the place, amazing riffs. To certain members of the audience, this is the thing that made Amy a live performer.

What weirdly felt like the most authentic choice was to be able to use my own voice to make whatever choice came to me in the moment from a purely impulse perspective as an actor. What was inspiring me at this moment? Is it that I’m looking at Blake during “There Is No Greater Love” and I’m so overwhelmed with feeling and emotion that I want to hold on to a specific sound for longer so that he can hear me through all of those decisions? In the same way, the first time you hear her write one of her own songs with “What Is It About Men,” I wanted to be able to think about each line. How am I formulating this moment? you get to see the behind-the-scenes of the creation of a song. That’s a really beautiful thing. If we were cutting to the studio recording of “What Is It About Men,” for example, you couldn’t have that scene of Amy sitting on the bed writing it for the first time, getting mixed up with certain words.

I basically felt I needed to get as close as possible to something that sounded as recognizable as possible to one of the most recognizable voices that you would believe in. The truth is, if you listen to them side by side, I’m sure there are huge differences. But it doesn’t matter as long as you believe what she’s saying and as long as you believe what she’s feeling. That, to me, was always the most important thing as an actor, obviously. It’s the intention that matters. Process-wise, I trained very hard and also learned to play the guitar. I listened to all the people that I think she would have grown up listening to. As Sam said, we had lots of playlists of hers.

I was aware that she grew up listening to Billie Holiday, Sarah Vaughan, Diana Washington, Ella Fitzgerald, Lauryn Hill, Ray Charles. I just surrounded myself with that music and was singing along to it all the time. Then I was using the techniques I was learning with my singing teacher that were Amy’s tecjmoqies. We have a different face. She has a bigger jaw than me. She had a different nose to me. We use different resonances. So, it’s different. But the intention is the most important thing. I was training for two hours a day, every day, over the four months with my singing teacher.

T2C: There’s so much to dive into with its emotionality, but you touched upon something that I wanted me to talk to you about – creating these scenes like Glastonbury, the Grammys and things that we have enormous touchstones for beyond Amy’s experiences. These are media events that happen all the time. So practically recreating these scenes, which you do so successfully, can you talk more about them?

Sam Taylor-Johnson: Oh, I’d love to because I’m so proud of Glastonbury. When you see that big open-air festival, we shot it in a room not much bigger than this theater. We just had brilliantly creative teams working on this. Glastonbury for the rest of the year is just a field. So all of those stages and everything, we had to recreate and film it. I had an incredible sound crew. What we created, it took months to get that sound exactly right. Then the Ronnie Scott scene early on. That was the only time I ever saw Amy play, in a young, up-and-coming Voices of Jazz. How old was she? Probably 19 or 20. It was at Ronnie Scott’s. I used my memory of what it felt like being in the room with her to recreate how that would have felt. But yes, a lot of it, like the Grammys, we had YouTube running alongside what we were filming to try and emulate it as much as possible – like the same camera angles. Marisa’s performance, as you can see, was absolutely spot-on. Every finger movement was incredible. So it was fun. It was so fun to recreate this. And, it’s fun to watch it.

Film: Back to Black

Director: Sam Taylor-Johnson

Cast: Marisa Abela, Jack O’Connell, Eddie Marsan, Juliet Cowan, Lesley Manville, Sam Buchanan, Pete Lee-Wilson, Thelma Ruby, Renee Matilda Thorpe, Ryan O’Doherty

Continue Reading

Broadway

Ken Fallin’s Broadway: Richard M. Sherman Songwriter for Mary Poppins and Jungle Book Passes On

Published

on

Richard M. Sherman, was a nine-time Academy Award nominee along with his brother Robert. The Sherman Brothers wrote more than 200 songs for some 27 films and 24 television productions. Their film credits include Mary Poppins, The Jungle Book, The Absent-Minded Professor, The Parent Trap, Summer Magic tv, The Sword in the Stone, That Darn Cat!, Winnie the Pooh and the Honey Tree, The Happiest Millionaire, The Aristocats, and Bedknobs and Broomsticks.

The won two Academy Awards for Mary Poppins, taking home the trophies for Best Score – Substantially Original and Best Original Song (for “Chim Chim Cher-ee”). They won three Grammy awards and received 24 gold and platinum albums and were inducted into the Songwriters Hall of Fame in 2005 and received the US National Medal of the Arts in 2008.

They also wrote the score on Broadway for Over Here.

The brothers were portrayed in the 2013 film Saving Mr. Banks, which told the story behind the making of Mary Poppins.

Sherman died of age-related illness at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Beverly Hills. His brother Robert died in 2012.

 

 

Continue Reading

Broadway

Ken Fallin’s Broadway: On The Town For Fleet Week

Published

on

Fleet Week is upon us, so, attached is a drawing I did of Channing Tatum a few years ago for The Los Angeles Times. This was done for Hail Caesar! choreographed by Christopher Gattelli.

Hail Caesar!  is by Joel and Ethan Coen (No Country for Old Men, Fargo), starring Josh Brolin, George Clooney, Alden Ehrenreich, Ralph Fiennes, Jonah Hill, Scarlett Johansson, Frances McDormand, Tilda Swinton, and Channing Tatum, Hail, Caesar! follows a single day in the life of a studio fixer who is presented with plenty of problems to fix.

Here is a video with Channing and the rest of the cast. Talk about a great Happy Memorial Day!

Continue Reading

Dance

Events For June

Published

on

On going is still  Beatrix Potter: Drawn to Nature, is at The Morgan Library & Museum through 6/9.Florals in Fashion highlights the work of designers Hilary Taymour (Collina Strada), Olivia Cheng (Dauphinette) and Kristen Alpaugh, aka FLWR PSTL Also Alicia Keys and Swizz Beatz’s “Giants,”is at the Brooklyn Museum until 7/7. The exhibition features artists who have made and continue to make a significant impact on the art world and contemporary culture. The show features 98 artworks by Black American, African, and African artists including Gordon Parks, Kehinde Wiley, Jean-Michel Basquiat, Mickalene Thomas, Hassan Hajjaj, Barkley L. Hendricks, Lorna Simpson, and Amy Sherald. Until 8/11 the Whitney Biennial, this happens every two years.  This year, the theme is “Even Better Than The Real Thing” and features the work of 71 artists and collectives. Also on display is Apollo: When We Went to the Moon at The Intrepid Museum. The exhibit is included with museum admission and goes until 10/2. The Rubin Museum, is permanently closing its physical space later this year and is open until October. If you’ve never been time to go. Until 10/27: The New York Botanical Garden is getting in on the Mad Hatter fun with a new, garden-wide exhibition for 2024 titled “Wonderland: Curious Nature.”

6/1 -23: How Long Blues at Little Island. Twyla Tharp featuring live music by T Bone Burnett and David Mansfield.

6/6 – 16: Tribeca Film Festival

6/7 – 9: Governors Ball

6/7 – 24: River to River Festival 50th anniversary has celebrations of dance, music, video, installation, and exhibitions. Featuring 13 projects of live art, performances, and participatory events in public spaces throughout Downtown New York, the 2024 River To River Festival explores themes of resonance, reconsideration, and resistance.  All events are free and open to all. Reservations are requested for some performances and events with limited capacity reserve here.

6/9: National Puerto Rican Day Parade

6/10: Movie nights in Bryant Park Forrest Gump (1994)

6/12: The Tony Awards

6/12: NY Philharmonic Concerts in the Parks

6/12 – 30: Summer for the City The Dream Machine Experience and The Bridge Lincoln Center Presents Time travel through an immersive AR experience across our outdoor spaces led by Cyboracle, the larger-than-life virtual avatar portrayed by Nona Hendryx.

6/12: The third annual Summer for the City festival. Over 200 free or choose-what-you-pay events that span a variety of topics, genres and  locations.

6/13 – 16: Juneteenth New York Festival

6/13: Summer for the City The Outdoor Film Series Black Swan Natalie Portman gives an Oscar-winning turn as a sheltered but driven young dancer with a ballet company in NYC who begins to buckle under pressure

6/17: Movie nights in Bryant Park The Talented Mr. Ripley (1999)

6/18 and 20: SummerStage The Metropolitan Opera Summer Recital featuring Leah Hawkins, Mario Chang, Michael Sumuel

6/19 – 30: Black Restaurant Week up to 80 participating venues, including Red Rooster Harlem, Cascade Jerk, Twins BBQ Co., Collective Fare, Tamarind Island, Voila Afrique, Misfits Nutrition, Brooklyn Blend, Negril Village, Lee Lee’s Baked Goods, The Real Mothershuckers and many more.

6/20: Summer for the City The Outdoor Film Series Before Sunrise Jesse (Ethan Hawke) and Céline (Julie Delpy) meet on a cross-Europe train. In Vienna, they walk, talk, look around—and fall unexpectedly in love. Damrosch Park

6/21: Summer for the City Social Dance Abaddón Tango. Get swept up in the majesty and beauty of Argentinian tango at this social dance night featuring the Abaddón Tango sextet.

6/21: 125th birthday of the Bronx Zoo 

6/21: Summer for the City The Outdoor Film Series Before Sunset. Nine years after Before Sunrise’s open-ended finale, Before Sunset’s immediate question—did Jesse and Céline reunite in Vienna—soon gets eclipsed.

6/21: Summer for the City Silent Disco. Strut your stuff under the stars as our popular Silent Disco series returns to NYC’s largest outdoor dance floor with a ten-foot disco ball.

6/22: The Coney Island The Mermaid Parade kicks off at 1pm.

6/22: Summer for the City Mykal Kilgore a concert for all ages featuring GRAMMY-nominated performing artist Mykal Kilgore!

6/22: Summer for the City The Wedding: New York’s Biggest Day Ever dreamed of getting married at Lincoln Center? For the third year in a row, we’re inviting hundreds of couples to celebrate love. Come join us!

6/22 -23: SailGP (Sail Grand Prix) will bring 10 international teams to the waters to race turbocharged F50 catamarans at more than 60 miles per hour. Fans can watch the action in stadium-style seats close to shore along Governors Island.

6/23: Summer for the City Rosanne Cash.  one of America’s leading songwriters and creative voices, performs a live set on the 30th anniversary of her classic album, The Wheel.

6/24 and 26: SummerStage The Metropolitan Opera Summer Recital featuring Brittany Olivia Logan, Hannah Jones, Matthhew Cairns

6/26: Summer for the City ABT Silent Disco With DJ Remeice and Connor Holloway. Celebrate Pride Week with American Ballet Theatre in a silent disco spun by DJ Remeice and co-

6/24: Movie nights in Bryant Park Boomerang (1992)

6/26-29: Robeson at Little Island.

6/29: SummerStage Pride Disco: DJ Trixie Mattel + Amanda Lepore + Jess King

6/30: Pride Fest, The March

6/30: SummerStage Dreamland: Pride In Central Park With John Summit

 

 

 

 

Continue Reading

Broadway

League of Professional Theatre Women Invite the Public to Oral History Interview Of Broadway Playwright Theresa Rebeck

Published

on

Stage, film, television and novel writer Theresa Rebeck will be interviewed about her long and brilliant career at 6p.m., Monday, June 3, at the Bruno Walter Auditorium, at the New York Public Library for the Performing Arts at Lincoln Center (111 Amsterdam Avenue at 65th Street), New York.
This event, which is FREE and open to the public, is part of the League of Professional Theatre Women’s (LPTW) Oral History Project in partnership with the Library and is a highlight of LPTW’s 41st season.
Theresa Rebeck is a widely produced writer for stage, film, television and novels, whose work can be seen and read throughout the United States and internationally. With five plays produced on Broadway, Rebeck is the most Broadway-produced female playwright of our time.
Rebeck’s Broadway credits include I Need That (starring Danny DeVito), Bernhardt/Hamlet (starring Janet McTeer), Dead Accounts (starring Norbert Leo Butz); Seminar (starring Alan Rickman); Mauritius (starring F. Murray Abraham). Other New York productions of her work include Dig (Outer Critic’s Circle nomination), Seared (starring Raul Esparza, DramaLeague Award) at MCC Theater, Downstairs (starring Tim Daly and Tyne Daly); The Scene (starring Tony Shalhoub), The Water’s Edge, Loose Knit, The Family of Mann and Spike Heels at Second Stage; Bad Dates, The Butterfly Collection and Our House at Playwrights Horizons; The Understudy at Roundabout Theatre Company; and View of the Dome at New York Theatre Workshop. Other notable plays include Poor Behavior, What We’re Up Against, and Omnium Gatherum (co-written), which was a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize in 2013.
As an author, Rebeck has written three novels: Three Girls and Their Brother (Random House/Shaye Areheart Books, 2008), Twelve Rooms with A View (Random House/Shaye Areheart Books, 2010) and I’m Glad About You (G.P. Putnam’s Sons, 2016), along with Free Fire Zone, a book of comedic essays about writing and show business.
Rebeck made her NYC Directorial debut with Rob Ackerman’s play Dropping Gumballs on Luke Wilson at The Working Theatre and directed the World Premiere of her new play Dig at Primary Stages in NY and Dorset Theatre Festival in Vermont. Her new podcast play, “Nightwatch” (starring Norbert Leo Butz), was released in 2023.
In television, Rebeck created the NBC showbiz drama “Smash,” and has written for “Canterbury’s Law,” “LA Law,” NYPD Blue,” “Law & Order: Criminal Intent,” “Dream On,” Brooklyn Bridge,” and many more.
Her produced feature films include the big-budget all-female spy thriller 355 (co-written with Simon Kinberg for Jessica Chastain’s production company); Trouble (writer/director), starring Angelica Huston and Bill Pullman; Harriet the Spy; Gossip and the independent features Sunday on the Rocks and Seducing Charlie Barker, an adaptation of her play, The Scene.
Theresa lives in Brooklyn with her husband Jess Lynn.
To attend this event, please RSVP HERE.
To view past oral history interviews, visit the Library’s Theatre on Film and Tape Archive, or visit the LPTW’s archive.
Women working in the theatre industry are eligible to join LPTW.  For more information on upcoming events and to join LPTW, visit: www.theatrewomen.org.
Continue Reading

Trending

Copyright © 2023 Times Square Chronicles

Times Square Chronicles