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Cabaret is a very personal musical art form. Broadway performers normally tied to the stories of the musicals in which they appear come to us in cabaret rooms as themselves, and share their personal passions with their audience. If you’re a fan of that performer, it s a rare and exciting opportunity to be made a part of their lives for just a moment. So it was a thrill to experience the beautiful voices and celebratory intimacy of musical theater stars Melissa Errico and Ryan Silverman as they set sparks flying Tuesday night in Broadway Romance, a beautiful evening of songs about love Broadway style, which just concluded its brief run at Feinstein’s/ 54 Below, under the always brilliant musical direction of Austin Cook.

As Ms. Errico astutely pointed out, “When it’s really hot outside, the best place to go is a basement.”But even the subterranean setting, and all the  air conditioning, couldn’t keep this dynamic vocal duo from heating up the room.

Mr. Silverman and Ms. Errico have performed as a couple in love in both Finian’s Rainbow at the Irish Repertory and in Sondheim’s Passion at the Classic Stage.  So they are well practiced in making love to one another on stage.  They share an easy and engaging chemistry with each other.   However, they are also quick to remind us that it’s only make believe.  That’s something  I’m sure Ms. Errico’s tennis player husband, Patrick McEnroe, who  is on tour with the U.S. open, and Mr. Silverman’s wife, Kim, who was sitting in the audience, must be happy to know.   At one point, Ms. Errico even deferred to Mrs. Silverman to get permission to sit on Mr. Silverman’s lap.   But what the heck.  It’s all in the  theatrical family!

Ms. Errico is a mellifluous soprano with a fast trill and a lightness in her voice appropriate to her long history of being cast, in her words, as a  “terminal ingénue.” But at fortysomething, she has no worries. She is at her beautiful prime. She glows both with a still  youthful beauty, and also  with the ripeness of a  mother of three who can still turn a head.  She is a strong, sexy, and delicious musical theater force of nature. See her now through September 6th in On a Clear Day You Can See Forever at the Irish Rep.

Mr. Silverman is a boyishly handsome and charming leading man, who last wowed Broadway audiences in the revivial of Side Show. He is an exciting baritenor with both soaring high notes and deeper, warmer tones.

The evening opened with a trio of Irish themed songs from Finian’s Rainbow written, as Ms. Errico pointed out, by “two left wing Jewish intellectuals,Burton Lane and Yip Harburg. In How Are Things in Glocca MorraLook to the Rainbow, and Old Devil Moon, they recreated the onstage romance which they played at the Irish Rep. Although the male lead in that show was written for a baritone, Mr. SiIverman sang higher harmonies with Ms. Errico, more in keeping with his tenor side.

But Mr. Silverman also reached deep into his baritone self to deliver powerful and sexy renditions of So In Love from Kiss Me Kate in duet with Ms. Errico, and an absolutely bring-down-the-house version of They Call the Wind Maria from Paint Your Wagon by Lerner and Lowe.

One of the fun parts of cabaret is its casual setting. So Ms. Errico only endeared herself to us when she shuffled the verses to How Are Things in GLocomorra, and  back tracked to get them right. But later in the show, Mr. Silverman tried to cover less obviously, when he stumbled in more than one place on the lyrics to Billy Bigelow’s Soliloquy from Carousel. I guess I was the only one in the room who knew the song well enough to get a guffaw out of his conflagration of the lyrics, when  instead of  “Haul a scow around a canal, run a cow around a corral” he sang  “haul a cow around a canal”! Either way, it was sung beautifully. But I’ll still take Joshua Henry’s current Broadway interpretation of the song for its depth.

Ms. Errico displayed her sexiest side to sing a big belt version of Harold Arlen and Johnny Mercer’s torch classic, Come Rain or Come Shine. She then segued into the role of Aphrodite, the Goddess of Love herself, to sing That’s Him by Kurt Weill and Ogden Nash from One Touch of Venus. Following that, she stretched flat out on her back on the piano, looking fabulous…and nearly had a wardrobe malfunction. But she came back with a great ad lib, admitting, “I just tried it upside down for the first time! I mean, singing….sorry, Mom!”  The next love song, Speak Low, also by Kurt Weill, was given a particularly ethereal setting by Mr. Cook.

A highlight of the evening for me was their recreation of songs and moments from Passion by Mr. Sondheim, including a duet version of Loving You.

The lightness and speed of Ms. Errico’s vibrato doesn’t always lend itself to songs more darkly dramatic than musically gorgeous. So her rendition of Another Winter in a Summer Town from Grey Gardens, as expertly delivered as it was, seemed to lack the vocal gravitas to match the material. That was followed by Mr. Silverman’s fine handling of the conflicted love song, How to Handle a Woman from Camelot.

Even though it was billed as a Broadway evening, they included a couple interesting songs from the pop world. One was Peoples Parties/Real Emotion by Joni Mitchell and Randi Newman. The other was Secret O’ Life by James Taylor. After that, they went back to conclude the regular evening with Surrey With the Fringe on Top from the granddaddy modern musical of them all, Rogers and Hammerstein’s Oklahoma. They encored with Windmills of Your Mind by Michel Legrand and the Bergmans.

Mr. Cook’s expressive accompaniment was a real triumph in his 54 Below debut. Mr. Cook had previously made a huge impact as a Chicago musical theater director and accompanist before coming to NYC with last season’s War Paint.  He’s also a fine singing actor.  So it raised the evening to a whole other level, watching him fully inhabit the songs he played.  His passionate playing was as dramatic and illustrative as watching Leonard Bernstein conduct, which is high praise indeed. Look for him around town in the future.

Ms. Errico will be back in November to debut a new album of songs by Mr. Sondheim, and I hope to be there to hear it.  Mr. Silverman, a Canadian, offered to rent a bus at one point in the show and take us all to Canada for a couple of years. As long as he sings to us along the way, I’m in.

Jeffery Lyle Segal is a multifaceted theater artist who has worn many professional hats. He started as a musical theater performer in his teens. He attended Stanford U., Northwestern University, and SUNY at Binghamton to study acting, directing and dramatic literature. He also wrote theater reviews for The Stanford Daily and was Arts Editor of WNUR Radio at Northwestern. After college, he is proud to have been the first full time Executive Director of Chicago’s acclaimed Steppenwolf Theater Company. He left them to work as a theater actor and director. His special effects makeup skills got him into the movies, working on the seminal cult horror film, Re-Animator.He also did casting for several important Chicago projects, sometimes wearing both production hats, as he did on Chicago’s most famous independent movie, Henry: Portrait of a Serial Killer. While living in Los Angeles, he joined the Academy for New Musical Theater, where he developed two book musicals as a composer, lyricist and librettist, Down to Earth Girl (formerly I Come for Love, NYMF 2008), and Scandalous Behavior! (York Developmental Reading Series 2010). He wrote, produced and performed his song “Forever Mine” as the end title theme of the horror film, Trapped! He also has written songs for his performances in cabaret over the years, and the time he spent pursuing country music in Nashville. Most recently he created a musical revue, Mating the Musical, for the Chicago Musical Theater Festival 2016. In NYC, he has attended the BMI musical theater writers’ workshop, and the Commercial Theater Institute 14 week producer program. He is currently creating a company to develop new musicals online. He still keeps up his makeup chops, working with top doctors in NYC and Chicago as one of the country’s most highly regarded permanent cosmetic artists (www.bestpermanentmakeup.com) and as a member of Chicago local IATSE 476. www.jefferylylesegal.com

Cabaret

My View: Norm Lewis…. “SUMMERTIME” at 54 Below… Spike Lee & Celebs Attend

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In all my years of going to shows, whether theatre, concerts, clubs, cabaret, etc., I have never done what I did this past week and I’m not sure I can even explain. I went to see Norm Lewis at 54 Below on June 6th and didn’t just love it, I was somehow hypnotized by the man and the material. That night, Miss Melba Moore was his Special Guest and invited to share the stage and something magical happened. The program was all showtunes and treasure from Broadway-current, past and even a little in between, with one brilliant piece of Off-Broadway gold, TRY TO REMEMBER, dedicated to the memory of the late, great Jerry Orbach. Then, upon finding out the Guest List for the entire 7 shows, we just decided we wanted to be there and it was the right decision. Night after night, added and/or subtracted songs to adapt to the desired length of the show. Every night, Norm’s longtime friend and trusted Director, Richard Jay-Alexander, on the scene, along with Musical Director/Arranger Joseph Joubert on keys, Perry Cavari on drums and percussion and a very cool Dylan Shamat on both electric and acoustic bass. Each night a different kind of magic and, lucky me, living so nearby, I was able to capture all the Award Winning Guests and high=profile friends. So, here for Norm Lewis, who brought summer early to all of us at 54 Below, is a scrapbook of his seven nights and special guests, both on stage and off. Now that the run is over, what will Eda and I do tonight??? Bravo!

BRIAN STOKES MITCHELL & NORM LEWIS

54 BELOW

NORM LEWIS

NORM LEWIS

MELBA MOORE & NORM LEWIS

MELBA MOORE

STEPHEN SCHWARTZ & NORM LEWIS

STEPHEN SCHWARTZ & WALTER MARKS

PASTOR BOBBY LEWIS & NORM LEWIS

MARC SHAIMAN

MARC SHAIMAN & NORM LEWIS

NORM LEWIS (Sweeney Todd)

NORM LEWIS

LEN CARIOU

NORM LEWIS

NORM LEWIS & ALICE RIPLEY

ALICE RIPLEY & NORM LEWIS

WILL SWENSON & NORM LEWIS

WILL SWENSON

WILL SWENSON

BRIAN STOKES MITCHELL & NORM LEWIS

BRIAN STOKES MITHCELL & NORM LEWIS

NOVA PAYTON & NORM LEWIS

NOVA PAYTON & NORM LEWIS

OLIVIA ELEASE  HARDY

OLIVIA ELEASE HARDY & NORM LEWIS

OLIVIA HARDY

THE DRINKWATER BROTHERS

THE DRINKWATER BROTHERS

NORM LEWIS

NORM LEWIS

SPIKE LEE & NORM LEWIS

SPIKE LEE & NORM LEWIS

RICHARD JAY-ALEXANDER & SPIKE LEE

LEN CARIOU

MARC SHAIMAN

SPIKE LEE

MARILYN MAYE

MELISSA ERRICO

RICHARD JAY-ALEXANDER & BRIAN STOKES MITCHELL

JENNIFER ASHLEY TEPPER

RICHARD JAY-ALEXANDER, SPIKE LEE, TONY DANZA

LEN CARIOU, NORM LEWIS, MARC SHAIMAN

HUGH PANARO, EDA SOROKOFF, STEVEN REINEKE, ERIC GABBARD

54 BELOW

CARLOS CLEMENZ

NORM LEWIS

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Cabaret

Norm Lewis, Stephen Schwartz Made For a Fabulous Summertime at 54 Below

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Norm Lewis is presenting “SUMMERTIME (Special Tony Edition)” from June 6-13, 2024 at 54 Below.

Stephen Schwartz

The night of June 7, Mr. Lewis was joined on stage by composer Stephen Schwartz and Bobby Lewis ( Mr. Lewis’ cousin). The show was directed by Richard Jay-Alexander, musical direction and piano Joseph Joubert, drums – Perry Cavari and on Bass -Dylan Shamat.

Norm began the evening by entering through the audience greeting the enthusiastic crowd singing “Don’t Rain on My Parade” (Julie Stone/Bob Merrill).’

Norm Lewis

At one point While he left the stage for wardrobe change his special guest Stephen Schwartz took to the piano to sing “The Hardest Part of Love” from his musical Children of Eden.

Norm and Bobby Lewis

Mr. Lewis left the stage one more time to give the moment to Bobby Lewis singing ”One Song Glory ” from Rent (music and lyrics by Jonathan Larson.

Lee Roy Reams, Marilyn Maye

Before leaving the stage Mr Lewis joined  his cousin Bobby Lewis in a duet singing “For Good” from Wicked (music and lyrics by Stephen Schwartz.
Each night of the run will feature surprise guest .
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Cabaret

My View: SUMMERTIME Starring Norm Lewis Just Keeps Getting HOTTER!

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I don’t usually post multiple photo essays of the same show/event, but, in this case, I simply must or I wouldn’t be doing my job of “reporting” here in Times Square Chronicles. The fact of the matter is that my wife, Eda, and I have been to Norm Lewis’s new show SUMMERTIME (Special Tony Edition) 3 times now and it has been “delivering” on a nightly basis more thrills and excitement than any other run of a show we have previously witnessed. The show is beautifully directed by the gifted Richard Jay-Alexander, with musical direction and arrangements from the equally gifted Joseph Joubert. What Norm and his artistic posse have put together is so satisfying that you get drawn in and forget you’ve already seen it. Add to this unexplainable phenomenon the array of Broadway Guests and each night has been a delight for so many different reasons. Because I live conveniently close, I am able to capture historic pairings of creative giants and I had to put this together so you could witness the kind of history that has already been made each of these nights at 54 Below. Norm has 4 more shows and many more Special Guests on June 10, 11, 12 and 13 and I can only heartily recommend you go see this man who is so comfortable in his stardom, that he easily seduces you into his world of music and Broadway. You will not be disappointed. I must also note that there has been as much star power in his audiences as there are on stage, adding extra excitement to every night.

( I couldn’t catch all the celebs in the audience but here are a few photo highlights)

NORM LEWIS & LEN CARIOU

NORM LEWIS (Sweeny Todd)

LEN CARIOU

STEPHEN SCHWARTZ & WALTER MARKS

STEPHEN SCHWARTZ & NORM LEWIS

MARC SHAIMAN & NORM LEWIS

NORM LEWIS & MARC SHAIMAN

LEN CARIOU, NORM LEWIS, MARC SHAIMAN

MELBA MOORE & NORM LEWIS

MELBA MOORE & NORM LEWIS

MALBA MOORE & NORM LEWIS

MARILYN MAYE & NORM LEWIS

MARILYN MAYE

LEE ROY REAMS & MARILYN MAYE

WALTER MARKS, JENNIFER HALLIE DIAMOND, ROBERT DIAMOND, founder/owner BROADWAYWORLD, RICHARD JAY-ALEXANDER

NORM LEWIS, ROBERT DIAMOND, JENNIFER HALLIE DIAMOND

HUGH PANARO, EDA SOROKOFF, STEVEN REINEKE, music director/conductor The New York Pops, ERIC GABBARD

RICHARD JAY-ALEXANDER, EDA SOROKOFF, STEVEN REINEKE, ERIC GABBARD

LORNA DALLAS BROWN, LEE ROY REAMS, MARILYN MAYE

RICHARD JAY-ALEXANDER & NORM LEWIS

PASTOR BOBBY LEWIS (Norm’s cousin) & NORM LEWIS

JOSEPH JOUBERT, music director

RICHARD JAY-ALEXANDER, NORM LEWIS, CATHERINE ADLER

JENNIFER ASHLEY TEPPER & RICHARD JAY-ALEXANDER

MARK SENDROFF, RICHARD JAY-ALEXANDER, RICHARD SKIPPER

54 BELOW

MACON PRICKETT

CARLOS CLEMENZ & MARC SHAIMAN

NORM LEWIS

EDA SOROKOFF & CATHERINE ADLER

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Cabaret

My View: Norm Lewis Brings On The Summer Heat at 54 Below

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“The Heat is On” at 54 Below with a new show Norm Lewis is performing, called SUMMERTIME (Special TONY Edition). From his dazzling entrance to his beautiful “goodnight” the evening is wall-to wall Broadway treasure. Yes, summer arrived early ,last night, and whatever the kinship and connection between the star, his musical director Joseph Joubert and his director Richard Jay-Alexander, is, it bathed us in magic with stunning music, beautiful arrangements, humor, glamour, stories and vocals that are, quite honestly, beyond just having a powerful skill set. Norm is a sublime actor who happens to possess a magnificent voice and he uses every dimension of it.

During the run he will have special guests who are both friends and Broadway royalty. Last night, he “blew up” this concept by introducing us to the legendary TONY winner, Melba Moore. I don’t usually write about specific material, but when your brain can’t comprehend that Miss Moore tore into “Aquarius” and “Let The Sunshine In” from HAIR with Mr. Lewis, hearts were jumping and joy exploded in the room. Only to be followed by Melba singing “I Got Love” from PURLIE (wait for it) in the original key! The 3 piece band, led by Joubert, also consisted of Perry Cavari on drums and percussion and Dylan Shamat on both acoustic and electric bass. The sounds they made all night were as versatile as could be accomplished and have become a trademark, of sorts, for Norm. Don’t hesitate to get to 54 Below and start your summer early. This man brings the heat with him onto the stage. 

Norm Lewis

NORM LEWIS

NORM LEWIS

NORM LEWIS

MELBA MOORE

MELBA MOORE & NORM LEWIS

MELBA MOORE

MELBA MOORE

54 BELOW

54 BELOW

NORM LEWIS

NORM LEWIS

NORM LEWIS

NAACP Lifetime Achievement Award

JOSEPH JOUBERT

54 BELOW

MELBA MOORE & NORM LEWIS

RICHARD JAY-ALEXANDER & NORM LEWIS

MELBA MOORE & NORM LEWIS

HUGH PANARO, EDA SOROKOFF, STEVEN REINEKE, ERIC GABBARD

STEVEN REINEKE, ERIC GABBARD, NORM LEWIS

RICHARD SKIPPER, RICHARD JAY-ALEXANDER, NORM LEWIS, MARK SENDROFF

CARLOS CLEMENZ & NORM LEWIS

RICHARD JAY-ALEXANDER & NORM LEWIS

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Broadway

We Say Good-Bye To Janice Paige

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Janice Paige turned 100 was born on September 16, 2022, and died at her on June 2, 2024, at the age of 101. Paige was an American actress and singer. With a career spanning nearly 60 years, she was one of the last surviving stars from the Golden Age of Hollywood.

Born in Tacoma, Washington, Paige began singing in local amateur shows at the age of five. After high school, she moved to Los Angeles, where she became a singer at the Hollywood Canteen during World War II, as well as posing as a pin-up model. This led to a film contract with Warner Bros. She later left the studio to pursue live theatre work, appearing in a number of Broadway shows. She continued to alternate between film and theatre work for much of her career. Beginning in the mid-1950s, she also made numerous television appearances, as well as starring in her own sitcom It’s Always Jan.

Paige began co-starring in low-budget musicals, often paired with Dennis Morgan or Jack Carson. She co-starred in Romance on the High Seas (1948), the film in which Doris Day made her movie debut. Paige later co-starred in adventures and dramas, in which she felt out of place. Following her role in Two Gals and a Guy (1951), she decided to leave Hollywood.

Paige appeared on Broadway in a 1951 comedy-mystery play Remains to Be Seen. She also toured successfully as a cabaret singer. 


Stardom came in 1954 with her role as Babe in the Broadway musical The Pajama Game.  For the screen version, the studio wanted one major movie star to guarantee the film’s success, so John Raitt’s role of Sid was offered to Frank Sinatra, who would have been paired with Paige. When Sinatra declined, the producers offered Paige’s role of Babe to Doris Day, who accepted and was paired with Raitt.

Paige returned to Hollywood in Silk Stockings (1957), which starred Fred Astaire and Cyd Charisse, the Doris Day/David Niven comedy Please Don’t Eat the Daisies (1960), and as a love-starved married neighbor in Bachelor in Paradise (1961) with Bob Hope. A rare dramatic role was as Marion, an institutionalized prostitute, in The Caretakers (1963).


Paige returned to Broadway in 1963 in the short-lived Here’s Love. In 1968, when after nearly two years Angela Lansbury left the Broadway production of the musical Mame to take the show on a limited U.S. tour, Paige was the star chosen to be the first Broadway replacement.

Paige appeared in touring productions of musicals such as Annie Get Your Gun, Applause, Sweet Charity, Ballroom, Gypsy: A Musical Fable, and Guys and Dolls. In 1984, back on Broadway in a nonmusical play, Alone Together


Paige made her live dramatic TV debut June 27, 1957 in “The Latch Key” on Lux Video Theatre. She appeared as troubadour Hallie Martin in The Fugitive episode “Ballad for a Ghost” (1964). She also had a recurring role as Auntie V, Tom Bradford’s sister, in Eight Is Enough. Paige appeared as a waitress named Denise in both the seventh and ninth seasons of All in the Family. In her first appearance, she has a flirtation with Archie Bunker that threatens to become serious.

Paige appeared on episodes of 87th Precinct; Trapper John, M.D.;Columbo; Night Court; Caroline in the City; and in the 1975 television movie John O’Hara’s Gibbsville (also known as The Turning Point of Jim Malloy). In 1982, she appeared on St. Elsewhere as a female flasher who stalked the hallways of the hospital to “cheer up” the male patients. She also appeared on a season 11 episode of Happy Days, as a roadside diner waitress named Angela who may or may not be Fonzie’s long lost mother; Fonzie has a heartfelt talk with Angela, and it is left up to the viewer to determine if she is his mother or not. In the 1980s and 1990s, she was seen on several soap operas, including Capitol (1987, as Sam Clegg’s first wife, Laureen), General Hospital(1989–1990, as Katharine Delafield’s flashy Aunt Iona, a lady counterfeiter), and Santa Barbara (1990–1993, replacing Dame Judith Anderson as matriarch Minx Lockridge).


Paige was given a star in the Motion Picture section of the Hollywood Walk of Fame at 6624 Hollywood Boulevard on February 9, 1960.


In 2017, Paige wrote a guest column for The Hollywood Reporter in which she stated that Alfred Bloomingdale had attempted to rape her when she was 22 years old. She alleges that she was sexually assaulted after being lured into Bloomingdale’s apartment under false pretenses.

Paige was married three times.

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