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Burt Bacharach The Composer Who Wrote The Songbook of The 60’s Dies

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When you hear these songs;”Raindrops Keep Fallin’ on My Head,”This Guy’s in Love with You,””(They Long to Be) Close to You,” “Arthur’s Theme (Best That You Can Do),” “That’s What Friends Are For” there is one name that comes to mind….Burt Bacharach. I grew up with his music becoming the sound track of my life. He was a composer, songwriter, record producer, and pianist who composed hundreds of pop songs from the late 1950s through the 1980s, many in collaboration with lyricist Hal David. A six-time Grammy Award winner and three-time Academy Award winner, Bacharach’s songs have been recorded by more than 1,000 different artists.

Most of Bacharach and David’s hits were written specifically for and performed by Dionne Warwick. Bacharach went on to write hits for Gene Pitney, Cilla Black, Perry Como, Dusty Springfield, Jackie DeShannon, Bobbie Gentry, Tom Jones, Herb Alpert, B. J. Thomas, and the Carpenters, among numerous other artists. He arranged, conducted, and produced much of his recordings.

In 1956, at the age of 28, Bacharach’s productivity increased when composer Peter Matz recommended him to Marlene Dietrich, who needed an arranger and conductor for her nightclub shows.

In the early and mid-1960s, Bacharach wrote well over a hundred songs with David. In 1961 Bacharach discovered singer Dionne Warwick while she was a session accompanist. Dionne made her professional recording debut the following year with her first hit, “Don’t Make Me Over“.[41]


Over the next 20 years, Warwick’s recordings of his songs sold over 12 million copies, with 38 singles making the charts and 22 in the Top 40

Bacharach composed and arranged the soundtrack of the 1967 film Casino Royale, which included “The Look of Love”, performed by Dusty Springfield, and the title song, an instrumental Top 40 single for Herb Alpert and the Tijuana Brass. 

Bacharach and David also collaborated on the 1968 musical Promises, Promise. The year 1969 marked, perhaps, the most successful Bacharach-David collaboration, the Oscar-winning “Raindrops Keep Fallin’ on My Head”, written for and prominently featured in the acclaimed film Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid. The two were awarded a Grammy for Best Cast album of the year for “Promises, Promises” and the score was also nominated for a Tony award.


In 1971, Barbra Streisand appeared on The Burt Bacharach Special, as were dancer Rudolph Nureyev and singer Tom Jones. In 1972 with Sammy Davis Jr., Anthony Newley, and Vikki Carr.


In 1973, Bacharach and David wrote the score for Lost Horizon.

Bacharach and David reunited briefly in 1975 to write and produce Stephanie Mills’ second album, For The First Time, for Motown.

Bacharach’s marriage to Angie Dickinson ended, but he formed a new partnership with lyricist Carole Bayer Sager and “Arthur’s Theme (Best That You Can Do),” “That’s What Friends Are For” and other songs came forth.

Bacharach occasionally joined Warwick for sold-out concerts in Las Vegas, Los Angeles, and New York, where they performed at the Rainbow Room. A Grammy-winning album with Elvis Costello, Ronald Isley, Rufus Wainwright, and hip-hop producer Dr. Dre came next.

Bacharach’s autobiography, Anyone Who Had a Heart, was published in 2013.

At 88 years old, Bacharach composed and arranged his first original score in 16 years for the film A Boy Called Po. The theme song, “Dancing with Your Shadow”, was performed by Sheryl Crow.

After seeing the film, a true story about a child with autism, Bacharach decided he wanted to write a score for it, as well as a theme song, in tribute to his daughter Nikki — who had gone undiagnosed with Asperger syndrome, and who committed suicide at the age of 40.

“Live to See Another Day”, was dedicated to survivors of school gun violence. Proceeds from the release went to the charity Sandy Hook Promise.

In July 2020, Bacharach collaborated with songwriter and multi-instrumentalist Daniel Tashian on the EP Blue Umbrella, Bacharach’s first new material in 15 years. It earned Bacharach and Tashian a Grammy Award nomination for Best Traditional Pop Vocal Album for the 63rd Annual Grammy Awards.

Bacharach and David received the Library of Congress Gershwin Prize for Popular Song, the first time the honor has been given to a songwriting team.

Bacharach died of natural causes at his home in Los Angeles on February 8, 2023, at the age of 94.

Burt Bacharach will be missed but his songs will live on.

Suzanna, co-owns and publishes the newspaper Times Square Chronicles or T2C. At one point a working actress, she has performed in numerous productions in film, TV, cabaret, opera and theatre. She has performed at The New Orleans Jazz festival, The United Nations and Carnegie Hall. She has a screenplay and a TV show in the works, which she developed with her mentor and friend the late Arthur Herzog. She is a proud member of the Drama Desk and the Outer Critics Circle and was a nominator. Email: suzanna@t2conline.com

Events

Tribeca Festival Wraps Up with Big Apple Moment with ‘Satisfied’ Premiere

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The final day of the 2024 Tribeca Festival closed out with the film “Satisfied” at the Beacon Theater. The night also showcased a “Hamilton” pre-Tony anniversary moment with Renee Elise Goldsberry. After the premiere and performance guests gathered at Allure Lounge to sip on Hendrick’s Gin cocktails and to honor the indelible moment.

Roxstar Entertainment’s popular Cinema Center finished its premiere party run with the late-night soiree attended by director Chris Bolan and actress Kelli O’Hara as well as the fleet of producers on the film including executives from Stick Figures Productions and Amblin Documentaries.

Guests enjoyed a gourmet selection of canapes catered by Allure Restaurant as well as featured cocktails by Hendrick’s Gin including the Hendrick’s Grapefruit Collins.

“Roxstar Entertainment is pleased to continue to support independent filmmakers and distributors especially in its mission to get movie fans back into their true intended viewing medium, the movie theaters.  We are so grateful to be able to work with like-minded companies to sponsor and support the events and help drive the promotion and celebration for the films, filmmakers, and respective casts,” says David Manning, Roxstar Entertainment’s Executive Producer of the Cinema Center.

 

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Film

Tribeca Festival – Best Films from Documentaries, Features and Shorts

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It was a thrilling Tribeca Film Festival with a showcase of superb filmmaker talent from around the globe. Here were some notable projects in 2024.

Ebb & Flow

Determined to have her first kiss, a young teenage girl defies her tumultuous world in search of normalcy.

The Brown Dog

Night after night, a watchman clocks into his lonely booth and spends hours composing endless security logs to stay awake, as he slowly descends into darkness.

A Rose for Katrina

Michael arrives for a date with Katrina, a woman he has met online. Hoping to make an impression he has brought her a rose. He is greeted at the door by someone who he initially believes is Katrina but who reveals themselves to be Katrina’s identical twin sister. While they wait for the real Katrina to emerge, she challenges Michael to take a strange bet and becomes verbally abusive when he refuses. Michael, confused and humiliated, leaves, at which point the “real Katrina” appears.

A Family Guide To Hunting

When Eva, a doomsday prepper, takes her uptight Korean-American parents and all-American boyfriend on a bonding hunting trip, things go from bad to grisly.

Catharsis

A dancer savant with serious anger issues is about to sabotage his life when a strange psychotherapist brings him to face the shadows of his subconscious mind.

Griffin in Summer

Summer vacation is usually the time for kids to let loose, but for fourteen-year-old Griffin Nafly it’s time to get down to the serious business of putting on his dramatic new play. Featuring stellar performances from its cast of young actors, Griffin in Summer’s coming-of-age story is a portrait of the artist as a young boy dealing with the initial experiences of unrequited love.

The Shallow Tale of a Writer Who Decided to Write about a Serial Killer

A writer befriends a retired serial killer (Steve Buscemi) who becomes his unlikely marriage counselor and muse. As the writer grapples with his second novel and a crumbling marriage to his disillusioned wife (Britt Lower), the former killer reluctantly offers guidance on both matters, leading to a series of twists and turns that blur the lines between reality and fiction.

DRIVER

After losing everything, Desiree Wood takes a second lease on life as a long-haul truck driver. By establishing the organization “REAL Women In Trucking,” Desiree has amassed an irreverent coalition of women drivers to advocate for an equitable and fair quality of life on the road, and ensure the welfare of women drivers within their male-dominated profession. Nesa Azimi’s soulful and contemplative DRIVER follows Desiree as she strives to leave her tumultuous past behind and navigate toward a more hopeful and stable future.

Beacon

Driven by an overzealous sense of adventure, young sailor Emily (Julia Goldani Telles), quickly runs into trouble when she shipwrecks on a remote island. She’s rescued by the island’s lone inhabitant, Demián Bichir’s mysterious light keeper Ismael. Directed with gripping fashion by Roxy Shih, the stage is set for a nail-biting journey into the depths of human instinct necessary for survival.

Don’t You Let Me Go

Adela stands among the crowd at Elena’s wake, feeling disconnected from the hushed voices and harsh fluorescent lights that don’t remind her of her best friend’s intrinsic joy. Emotionally drained, Adela goes to her car and what does she find waiting for her but a bus. Not an ordinary bus, a magic bus – a bus that takes her back in time to a magical weekend. Writer-directors Ana Guevara and Leticia Jorge’s third film is a beautiful tribute to friendship, especially the bonds of friendship between women.

 

 

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Entertainment

Live From The Hotel Edison Times Square Chronicles Presents His Highness Dr. Mag. Prince Mario-Max zu Schaumburg-Lippe of Germany, MAS, LL.M

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We are so pleased to announce our guest this week is His Highness Dr. Mag. Prince Mario-Max zu Schaumburg-LippeI of Germany, MAS, LL.M. Yes, I really do know a prince and he is coming to be my guest.

Prince Mario-Max is an Award winning actor, event and TV-host, Bertelsmann Randomhouse author, public speaker and philanthropist.

Prince Mario-Max is a German, H.H. Dr. Princess Antonia zu Schaumburg-Lippe and H.H. Waldemar Prinz zu Schaumburg-Lippe

Prince Mario-Max is a German Prince and Royal as the birth son of H.H. Dr. Princess Antonia zu Schaumburg-Lippe and H.H. Waldemar Prinz zu Schaumburg-Lippe, being descendends from the Royal Danish Nachod Line of The Princely House of Schaumburg-Lippe, Founding Family of Hamburg, Lübeck and Kiel in Germany.
He is now bi-coastal living both in Hollywood and NYC.

“Live From The Hotel Edison Times Square Chronicles Presents ”, is a show filmed at the iconic Hotel Edison, before a live audience. To see our past episodes; First episode click here second episode click here,  third episode click here, fourth episode click here, fifth episode click here, sixth episode here, seventh episode here, eighth episode here, ninth episode here, tenth episode here, eleventh episode here, our twelfth episode here, thirteenth episode here, fourteenth here, fifteenth here , 16th here, 17th here, 18th here and 19th here.

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Entertainment

Live From The Hotel Edison Times Square Chronicles Presents: Tina Louise

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We are so pleased to announce our guest this week is Tina Louise.

Tina Louise is widely known for her role as movie star Ginger Grant in the CBS television situation comedy Gilligan’s Island. Louise is the last surviving cast member of the TV series.

Louise got her first role at age two after being in an ad for her father’s candy store. She began studying acting, singing, and dancing at age 17 under Sanford Meisner at the Neighborhood Playhouse School of the Theatre in Manhattan. Her acting debut came in 1952 in the Bette Davis musical revue Two’s Company, followed by roles in such other Broadway productions as John Murray Anderson’s Almanac, Will Success Spoil Rock Hunter?, and the hit musical Li’l Abner. She appeared in the live television dramas Studio One and Producers’ Showcase.

Her breakthrough role in 1958 drama film God’s Little Acre for which she received the Golden Globe Award for New Star of the Year.

Louise left the Broadway musical Fade Out – Fade In to portray movie star Ginger Grant.

Louise had starring roles in The Trap, The Hangman, Day of the Outlaw, and For Those Who Think Young. She also appeared in The Wrecking Crew, The Happy Ending, and The Stepford Wives (1975). Later film roles included a co-starring appearance in the Robert Altman’s O.C. and Stiggs (1987) as well as the independently made satire Johnny Suede (1992) starring Brad Pitt. She appeared in the situation comedy Married… with Children as Miss Beck in episode “Kelly Bounces Back” (1990). In 2014, Louise starred in the spiritual drama Tapestry and the horror film Late Phases.

She also wrote a book that has been re-released called Sunday: A Memoir, a vivid portrait of the betrayal of the heart, trust, and the magical belief that only children have, in a poetic expression of the power of memory and the legacy of a lost childhood, as seen through the eyes of a young girl who became a celebrated actress.

An Audible sample – https://www.amazon.com/Sunday-Memoir-Tina-Louise/dp/0307440176

The below is a good page from her amazing book –

https://www.google.com/url?sa=t&source=web&rct=j&opi=89978449&url=https://tinalouise4ever0.tripod.com/tinalouiseclassicgoddess/id17.html&ved=2ahUKEwjs_f-VmuGGAxVxEVkFHegFCU4QFnoECBEQAQ&usg=AOvVaw1IMp5uBP2YY2SGYXdTqqWu

“Live From The Hotel Edison Times Square Chronicles Presents ”, is a show filmed at the iconic Hotel Edison, before a live audience. To see our past episodes; First episode click here second episode click here,  third episode click here, fourth episode click here, fifth episode click here, sixth episode here, seventh episode here, eighth episode here, ninth episode here, tenth episode here, eleventh episode here, our twelfth episode here, thirteenth episode here, fourteenth here, fifteenth here , 16th here, 17th here, 18th here and 19th here.

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Celebrity

The Glorious Corner

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G.H. Harding

CAMPBELL’S KITCHEN — (Via Ultimate Classic Rock) Mike Campbell  has been making records since the ’70s, most famously as a member of Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers.

“I’m grateful that I was part of that whole experience,” Campbell recently told UCR, speaking to his Heartbreaker days. It’s been a full decade since the band released their last album, 2014’s Hypnotic Eye, and six and a half years since Petty’s passing, which effectively ended the Heartbreakers.

Campbell describes himself as “still grieving,” but tries not to spend too much time dwelling. “If I think about it too hard, I’ll just get sad,” he says. In the past four years, he’s kept himself busy with new work, recording and performing with his band the Dirty Knobs. As Campbell sees it, their third album, Vagabound, Virgins & Misfits (out June 14 via BMG), marks “huge growth” for him both lyrically and vocally. After years of operating as Petty’s right-hand man and usually taking the backseat when it came to singing — Campbell sang lead on exactly one Heartbreakers song, “I Don’t Wanna Fight” from 1999’s Echo — it’s taken three albums worth of work to reach a place where he feels self-assured of his ability to front a band. “A lot of it is confidence,” he says.

UCR caught up with Campbell and talked about Vagabonds, Virgins & Misfits, including its various guest stars.

This is your third album with the Dirty Knobs, but obviously you’ve been in this business a long time. How would you say your approach to songwriting has changed from your early days to this new album?

Well, my approach to songwriting is the same as it’s ever been. Except when I was partnered with Tom, I mostly just did music. I would make music tracks and give them to him and if he liked it, he would write the words. Now that he’s gone, I have my own band, I’m exploring the lyrics and the characters, as well as the music. So that’s a new frontier, but I’m really taking to it and I’m just trying to get good at it, you know? I see a huge growth in three albums. This new album, I think, has some really good lyrics, and the band, as always. And just, you know, the music is just — it’s always there. I write all the time, you know, and that hasn’t waned at all.

I would like to mention though, just to carry on what you said before about the female’s perspective. (This writer spoke with Campbell previously about another upcoming album, Petty Country: A Country Music Celebration of Tom Petty.) One thing on this album that I love, which was an afterthought, was Lucinda Williams’ addition of her words in the song “Hell or High Water.” [I] cut it as a Dirty Knobs song, and then listening back, it occurred to me and George Drakoulias, the producer: Wouldn’t it be great if this female character in the song actually came in and sang on the song? When I thought of Lucinda, I thought, God, if she would do it, that would be perfect. And she came through with flying colors, she put so much heart and soul into that verse. So, there’s an example [of a] song from a woman’s perspective adding much more depth to the song.

Totally. It would have been an entirely different track without that. It’s great that you have these contacts at your disposal that you can call up.

The guests on the record were not me going out and cherry-picking people. They’re just people who seemed to show up. Like Graham Nash, who did an incredible job. He was doing an interview with me and I got up the courage to ask him if he would maybe sing on one song (“Dare to Dream”), which he did. Chris Stapleton, I think was in town that weekend getting a Grammy or something and he came by the house. Here, would you sing on this song? And [Benmont Tench came over] and put piano on it, you know. So, the guests were kind of afterthoughts, but in each case, they made the song way better.

Did Graham record his parts remotely or did he also come by your studio? I know he lives in New York and you’re in L.A.

No, I had already cut the song. It was finished. And I did the interview with him, and you know, I’m a huge Hollies fan, the ’60s, all those bands. So just being able to have a conversation with him was wonderful. And I was really kind of sheepish like, I didn’t think he would say yes. … I said “Would you be interested maybe in trying to sing on something?” And he goes, “Sure, I’ll make your song better.” [Laughs] So I had the track. He went back to New York. I sent him the track, as a lot of people do now, he did his vocals and mailed it back to me and I lost my mind. It was so good.

There were several tracks on this album that when I heard them, I thought “Wow, Mike’s voice sounds great.” You’ve really grown into your role as lead singer, from the first Dirty Knobs album (2020’s Wreckless Abandon) to this one. How do you feel about your singing now?

Wow, can I send you some flowers? [Laughs] I thank you for saying that. I’m getting used to it, you know? And I have a little Florida slang that comes through now and then. But I don’t sound like Tom. When I first started singing…I actually did sound a lot like him because we talk a lot the same and stuff. But I think I’ve worked hard to kind of filter that out through the three albums, and there will always be little bit of that Southern thing in there. I think I found a voice that I’m comfortable with. I’m not a Roy Orbison, [but] I have the personality of certain characters that I put across. And a lot of it is confidence, Allison. If you get confident and work on the voice a little bit and believe that you pulled it off, you know, that’s a lot of the game right there. So, my confidence has grown as I keep working on it. But thank you for that compliment, that was wonderful.

And that goes for live shows, too. I would imagine that you also feel some confidence when you’re up in front of a crowd that’s encouraging you.

Oh, yeah. You know, it’s interesting, because I play with the Dirty Knobs, it’s our songs, it’s our trip, but I’m still a member of this legacy. And I sometimes will do a few Heartbreakers songs just out of respect for Tom because the crowd likes them and I like singing some of them. But the crowd, yeah. When they’re there for you and supporting you…I get the sense that a lot of the people in the audience that know me and my years are pulling for me. … I’m trying to find my own way and they’re supporting me and they’re helping me get there

Speaking of singing, your wife, Marcie, sings some backing vocals on the song “Hands Are Tied.” Is that the first time she’s done that on one of your albums?

That’s a funny story. Because, you know, she usually sings around the house. She’s not a singer per se, but all through my life — you know, I’ll be doing a demo and I’ll say “Why don’t you come in and put a little part on this?” “No, no, no, I don’t sing.” On this album…she goes, “You know what? I think I’d like to sing on this one.” And I said “Really?” I was in shock. I said “Okay, well, we got this song. All you got to do is go ahhhhh.” [Laughs] And her sound and her feel on it really helped the song a lot.

You have a note in your credits thanking Stevie Nicks for the “cool dulcimer.” And you’re actually holding the instrument on the cover of the album. Can you tell me about that?

Yeah, I hope she sees the cover, ’cause I think she will appreciate it. There’s a story with that. When I was doing the Mac project, we were at rehearsal one day, and Mick Fleetwood came in with one of those customized dulcimers, just beautiful. And I was talking to him about it and saying “Oh, this is really a nice instrument.” I guess she overheard the conversation and a week later, I walk in and she says “Here, this is for you.” She went and bought one just like it for me. I was blown away. In fact, I even wrote the song — “Innocent Man” was written on that dulcimer, on the album. But the funny thing is, I took it home and played it — it’s in my studio — and then a couple of weeks later, she came up, she said, “You probably never even play it, do you?” [Laughs] I said “I play it all the time!” You know, that’s so Stevie. So, I hope that she sees the cover and knows that I covered it and used it.

You’ve had a number of full circle moments, so to speak, in the last few years. I’m thinking of your time touring with Fleetwood Mac and reconnecting with Stevie Nicks, or playing with Bob Dylane at Farm Aid last year. You also shot the “Dare to Dream” music video with the Dirty Knobs at the Church Studio in Tulsa, Oklahoma, which was where the Heartbreakers signed their very first record deal. Is there anything else along those lines you’d like to do? Anything you want to revisit?

Well, I enjoyed the Tulsa thing quite a bit. That was not my idea, but the idea came up [from] management. And I thought it was very touching to go back where Tom and I had passed through on the way to get a record deal and to revisit that energy and those ghosts in the studio there. I enjoyed that a lot. But to be honest with you, I’d rather like, think forward and not think backward because sometimes nostalgia can be sad, you know? I’m real proud of that video, though. But I think I want to move forward and think forward.

Speaking of blasts from the past: The Wallflowers are going to be playing a show in L.A. later this year and the plan is for them to perform the entirety of their album Bringing Down the Horse, which you played on, and also the entirety of the Heartbreakers’ Long After Dark. What do you think about that?

You know, it’s wonderful that people are pulling out this music and revisiting it, you know, and I love Dylan — Jakob Dylan. I played on their first single, “Sixth Avenue [Heartache],” which was really fun and I’ve always been proud of his career. And I think he’s taken on a lot to do all those songs in one set, but more power to him. I’m sure he’ll do a great job.

What are you most looking forward to about touring with this new Knobs music?

I’m thrilled beyond to go out on the road with my band and play the new album. I’m real proud of it and the songs sound great in rehearsal. And the show will be a lot of the new album, and I’ll be throwing in a couple of surprise Heartbreaker songs that I think people will like here and there.

Howie Mandel

SHORT TAKES — Why does Howie Mandel seem to be channeling Boy George’s fashion-look on the new America’s Got Talent season. A cry for help for sure …

I got a memo about a co-op for sale located at 12 West 21st Street in NYC. It took me a minute to recall that that was the address for the long gone and much missed Private Eyes club; where Scott Blackwell was DJ. Great memories for sure: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Private_Eyes_(nightclub)

The Eagles will do a residency at the Sphere in Las Vegas: https://www.forbes.com/sites/hughmcintyre/2024/06/13/the-eagles-announce-new-residency-at-las-vegas-sphere/

Seth Meyers

Is NBC really cutting the 8G band (led by Fred Armisen) for the Late Night with Seth Meyers? Read Roger Friedman’s exclusive take on this development: https://www.showbiz411.com/2024/06/12/nbc-cheaps-out-cuts-seth-meyers-live-band-from-show-beginning-in-september ..

PR-pasha David Salidor called to tell  us about a new book project. Steven J. Immerman’s In Search of Pleasure Island.  Here’s the logline: “In Search of Pleasure Island” delves into the bowels of ‘international sex trafficking’ as Dr. MATHEW NOBLE (a professor of criminology and retired special warfare operator) journeys across the globe in the search for his daughter and the men responsible for her abduction and his wife’s murder – stay tuned for more on this … Happy Bday Roger Friedman …

Mark James

RIP Tony LoBianco and Mark James, who wrote “Suspicious Minds” and “Hooked On A Feeling.”

NAMES IN THE NEWS — Tony Seidel; Mark Bego; Robert Shalom; Anni Bella; Terry Guerin; Terry Jastrow; Deb Caponetta; Melissa Davis; Dan Zelinski; Adam White; Glenn Friscia; Glenn Friscia; Vito Bruno; Lush Ice; Tom & Lisa Cuddy; Mitch Dolan; Race Taylor; Kent & Laura Denmark; Kevin Costner; Tony King; Elton John; Freddie Mercury; Donald Fagen; Warner LeRoy; and CHIP!

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