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Gulliver's gate

Michael Langer, Eiran Gazit, Langer

After much anticipation Gulliver’s Gate, 216 West 44th street, the world’s newest interactive miniature experience in Times Square, opened it’s door to it’s lilliputian spectacular world.

Gulliver's gate

Cutting the ribbon

Gulliver's gate

Gulliver's gate

Gulliver’s Gate Co-Founders Eiran Gazit and Michael Langer cut the ribbon cutting to celebrate the 49,000 square foot space of over 300 built-to-scale miniature models of scenes from around the world, including New York, South America, Europe, Asia, Israel and many more. Throughout the attraction,  hundreds of interactive moving model trains and vehicles, ships that sail, cable cars, balloons and more are accessible with just the turn of a key.

Gulliver's Gate

The investor who made t possible

In attendance were

Tish James

Tish James

NYC Public Advocate, Tish James

Corey Johnson

Corey Johnson

Local Council Member, Corey Johnson

Fred Dixon

Fred Dixon

CEO NYC & CO, Fred Dixon

Tim Tompkins

Tim Tompkins

Times Square Alliance President, Tim Tompkins

Gulliver's gate

The project has been in the works since 2014, with a team of about 600 artists from around the world who built their own perspective region. In addition to the state-of-the-art models, Gulliver’s Gate offers all guests the opportunity to create miniature versions of themselves. After getting scanned in the attraction’s 3D scanner, guests have the option to become a permanent fixture as a “model citizen” of Gulliver’s Gate.

 Gulliver's gate

The attraction begins in New York, where taxi’s subways and people are in abundant. Prominent landmarks have little gems to be found such as Spider-Man hanging off the Brooklyn Bridge.

Gulliver's Gate

Within these walls travel to the Paris and the Eiffel Tower. Switzerland,China’s Forbidden City.

Gulliver's gate

Or even the pyramids of Egypt.

Gulliver's gate

Gulliver’s Gate is impressive and overwhelming and you will definitely want to spend at least an hour if not two or three discovering the magic.

Gulliver's gate

Gulliver's gate

Gulliver's gate

Gulliver's gate

Gulliver's gate

Your Guest Key unlocks interactive surprises throughout the model, bringing it to life in unexpected and delightful ways.

Gulliver's gate

The inner workings

Gulliver's gate

Still creating

Gulliver's gate

Prices on-line save you $5.00 and the hours are Sunday-Thursday: 10am-7pm (last entry 5:30pm) and Friday-Saturday: 10am-10pm (last entry 8:30pm).

This gem of an exhibit is sure to thrill.

Suzanna, co-owns and publishes the newspaper Times Square Chronicles or T2C. At one point a working actress, she has performed in numerous productions in film, TV, cabaret, opera and theatre. She has performed at The New Orleans Jazz festival, The United Nations and Carnegie Hall. She has a screenplay and a TV show in the works, which she developed with her mentor and friend the late Arthur Herzog. She is a proud member of the Drama Desk and the Outer Critics Circle and was a nominator. Email: suzanna@t2conline.com

Out of Town

A Dancing Dolly 

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Hello, Dolly! is a 1964 musical with lyrics and music by Jerry Herman and a book by Michael Stewart, based on Thornton Wilder’s 1938 farce The Merchant of Yonkers, which Wilder revised and retitled The Matchmaker in 1955. The musical follows the story of Dolly Gallagher Levi, a strong-willed matchmaker, as she travels to Yonkers, New York, to find a match for the miserly “well-known unmarried half-a-millionaire” Horace Vandergelder. The show, directed and choreographed by Gower Champion and produced by David Merrick, moved to Broadway in 1964, winning 10 Tony Awards, including Best Musical. These awards set a record which the play held for 37 years. The show album Hello, Dolly! An Original Cast Recording was inducted into the Grammy Hall of Fame in 2002. There is no denying that Jerry Herman never wrote a bad song and that you will go home singing at least one if not several of these wonderfully tuneful songs.

In this neck of the woods, Stephen Casey is well-known for his high- stepping choreography and in the Act II production of Hello, Dolly!, he does not disappoint. Everyone in this show dances. The dance numbers are many and lengthy. And The Waiters Gallop number at the Harmonia Gardens Restaurant is especially applause worthy.  The pared down chorus is just as proficient at singing as they are at dancing. And the small stage at Act II is ingeniously used to give an appearance of a much bigger space. Jenny Eisehower is a very lively and likeable Dolly Levi, in contrast to Scott Langdon’s delightfully cantankerous Mr. Vandergelder. Ms. Eisenhower’s statuesque height plays well off the shorter Mr. Langdon.We know she is a woman who is always in control. Elyse Langley displays a mature soprano rendering of “Ribbons Down my Back” as Irene Malloy. Lee Slobotkin is quite endearing as Barnaby Tucker and Jeremy Konopka is a young Tommy Tune with his longer than you can believe it legs.

The costumes by Millie Hiibel were bright and playful and worked in tandem with the simple set design by Dirk Durossette. The score is fully orchestrated though, unfortunately it’s in the “can” which for me takes away from the excitement you get from a live musical.

Unfortunately, I did not enjoy the show as much as I would have had the minor characters not been instructed or simply encouraged to mug to the audience. Every time this happened it brought me right out of the show. In 1812’s producton of The Play That Goes Wrong many of the actors were mugging their pants off and playing it over the top — but they were forgiven because they were supposed to be a terrible community theatre company.

And yet, if you like Jerry Herman and a lot of dancing you will enjoy this show and understand why it’s been revived so many times.

Tickets are available online at act2.org, by calling the Act II Box Office at 215-654-0200, or in-person at the Box Office at 56 E. Butler Ave., Ambler, PA. The Box Office is open Mon-Sat, 2 p.m. – 6 p.m. Student tickets are $15 and group discounts are available.

Hello, Dolly! Directed and Choreographed by Stephen Casey. Running now through June 18, 2023 at Act II Playhouse                                                                     56 E. Butler Ave., Ambler, PA 19002

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Out of Town

The Sound Of Music Celebrates Opening Night at The John W. Engeman Theater

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The John W. Engeman Theater’s production of The Sound Of Music opened last night, Saturday, May 20th. The final collaboration between Rodgers & Hammerstein was destined to become the world’s most beloved musical. Featuring a trove of cherished songs, including “Climb Ev’ry Mountain,” “My Favorite Things,” “Do Re Mi,” “Sixteen Going on Seventeen,” and the title number, “The Sound of Music” has won the hearts of audiences worldwide.

The cast of The Sound of Music

The children of The cast of The Sound of Music

Caitlin Burke

Caitlin Burke

The cast features Caitlin Burke as Mother Abbess(National Tour: The Sound of Music; Regional: Paper Mill Playhouse, McCarter Theater Center, North Shore Music Theatre, Meadow Brook Theatre, New York City Center)

Matthew Bryan Feld

Matthew Bryan Feld

Matthew Bryan Feld as Max Detweiler (Engeman: Dirty Rotten Scoundrels; National Tours: Vocalosity; Regional: DCPA, Portland Center Stage, West VA Public Theatre, Derby Dinner Playhouse; TV/Film: “Manifest,” “Power,” “Fashionista”);

Angel Reda

Angel Reda

Angel Reda and Matthew Bryan Feld

Angel Reda as Elsa Schraeder (Broadway: The Cher Show, War Paint, Chicago; National Tours: Chicago, Sweet Charity; Regional: Oriental Theatre/, Goodman Theatre, Goodspeed, Pasadena Playhouse; TV/Film: “Ghost,” “The Undoing,” “Sami,” “Isn’t It Romantic”, “Stepford Wives”)

Tim Rogan

Tim Rogan

Tim Rogan as Captain Von Trapp (Engeman: Thoroughly Modern Millie; National Tours: Camelot, Disney’s Beauty and the Beast; Regional: Alliance Theatre, The Muny, Arena Stage, Cape Playhouse; TV/Film: “Physical”, “Blue Bloods”, “The Other Two”, “The Flight Attendant”)

Kayleen Seidl

Tim Rogan, Kayleen Seidl

Kayleen Seidl as Maria Rainer (Off-Broadway: Harmony: A New Musical, Fiddler on the Roof; National Tour: Guys and Dolls; Regional: Westchester Broadway Theatre, Paper Mill Playhouse, Actors’ Playhouse at Miracle Theatre, Heartland Opera Theatre).

Tyler Hechtis 

The Sound Of Music is directed and choreographed by Drew Humphrey (Engeman Theater: Dirty Rotten Scoundrels, Oklahoma, Mary Poppins, A Chorus Line, Singin’ in The Rain, Thoroughly Modern Millie, Guys and Dolls, 42nd Street, and Gypsy)

Mandy Modic and Drew Humphrey

and choreographed by Mandy Modic (Engeman Theater: Dirty Rotten Scoundrels; National Tours: 42nd Street; Regional: The Marriott Theater, Drury Lane Theater, Chicago Shakespeare, Paramount Theater, The Wick, Mill Mountain Theater).

Music Director Tom Vendafreddo joins with the band that includes Ben Kiley, Joe Boardman, Jill Boardman, Joel Levy, Bob Dalpiaz, Russell Brown and Jim Waddell

Tom Vendafreddo (Musical Director)

Tyler Hecht and Laura Park

Harrison Drake

Dane Agostinis

Kayla Kennedy

Liam Polani

Gina Naomi Baez

Christopher Morrissey

Finn Brown

Claire Daly

Micaela Maio

Oliver Cirelli

Evelyn Engelmann

Sadie Mathers

Cassidy Gill

Paige Mathers

Layla Turnier

Quinn Oliver Lessing

Quinn Oliver Lessing, Paige Mathers, Liam Polani, Finn Brown, Cassidy Gill, Kayla Kennedy, Laura Park, Layla Turnier, Evelyn Engelmann, Sadie Mathers, Micaela Maio, Claire Daly and Oliver Cirelli

Laura Park

Christopher Isolano

Max Desantis

Iann Allred

Tiffany Furicchia

Nicole Weitzman

Lauren Gobes

Amanda Hunter-Finch

Kayleen Seidl with Evelyn Engelmann, Sadie Mathers, Layla Turnier, Oliver Cirelli, Paige Mathers, Quinn Oliver Lessing, Laura Park and Kayleen Seidl

Finn Brown, Liam Polani, Micaela Maio, Claire Daly, Kayla Kennedy, Cassidy Gill, Laura Park, Kayleen Seidl and Tim Rogan

Mandy Modic (Choreographer/Associate Director), Tim Rogan, Kayleen Seidl, Drew Humphrey (Director) and Tom Vendafreddo (Music Director)

The Cast and Creative Team of The Sound of Music

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Out of Town

The Rage of Narcissus Rages On at Theatre Passe Muraille, Toronto

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The music pulls us into the looking glass, just like Narcissus was drawn to the reflective image of himself that would end up being his downfall. It’s a compelling and robust formulation, layering in Greek mythology around a sex-fueled obsession, gifted into a hotel room, not by the goddess of revenge, Nemesis, an aspect of Aphrodite, but by the app called Grindr. In Greek mythology, Narcissus was a hunter, known for his beauty, and somewhere, in The Rage of Narcissus, a one-person show written by Sergio Blanco (Darwin’s Leap; Slaughter), the hunter becomes the hunted, or at least that is what we are supposed to initially find ourselves believing.

I is an other,” we are reminded in neon, as the one-man show starts off casually, with Matthew Romantini (Ghostlight’s The Boys in the Band) entering and speaking directly to us. He’s going to tell us a tale, a narrative, that mixes reality and fiction. He isn’t the person standing before us, at least not for the majority of the monologue that isn’t one. He, the actor, is about to transform himself into Sergio, the playwright who is going to, inside his compelling and sometimes difficult text, weave an autofiction around one particular terrifying and disturbing week in Toronto. Sergio, the character who may (or most likely is not) be the same who wrote the script, has arrived at his hotel so that he can give a lecture later that week at the University, all around the idea of Narcissus and the artist. He’s quite a proud creature, rattling off his intellectual successes, well, like a narcissist treating us to a long list of his grand accomplishments. It’s somewhat distancing, yet it is a blurring of self and the other, and once Romantini finally unzips himself and slips into the reflective pool of Sergio, he digs in and meanders around a formulation that is part autobiography and some pretty forceful and harrowing fiction. It’s Greek mythology with blood stains, and a whole lot of graphic sex tales to either engage or distract. Depending on your tolerance.

Matthew Romantini in The Rage of Narcissus. Photo by Dahlia Katz.

It’s a somewhat compelling dynamic, and Romantini delivers an appealing and engaging presence, even when the tale falls victim to far too many banal exchanges, grand gesturing, and circular twisted reflections. Unfolding on a set designed by Renato Baldin (Caminos Festival’s Rocking Futures), alongside art director Marcelo Moura Leite with strong, sometimes overwhelming lighting choices by Brandon Gonçalves (Nightjan’s Back and Forth The Musical) and a clear sound design by Julián Henao, the textual thriller inches forward through a sex-fueled obsession, splattered with mystery and abstractionisms, cut with intellectual curiosities and fabrications.

Looking into the mythology of its namesake, the structuring starts to engage and layer in on its paralleling, just like the myth’s ideas around falling in love with his own reflection in a pool of water, staring at it until one dies. Yet in Blanco’s rendering the central figure and the other start to seem less real and more hypnotically wrapped up in one another, fantasy, and form. There’s a blending and a blurring of lines and boundaries, playing with the idea of reality and fantasy, and sometimes extreme delirious nightmares. The character of Sergio is enamored, fixated on the utterly handsome and sexy Grindr hookup that takes place that first afternoon, and even though he tries to reject the sexual advances, he can’t seem to shake the hypersexual images and urges that surround and envelop him as the week runs forward. But the blurring compromises the situation, and we are left rolling around in the eroticism and wondering if is it really just a mirroring of a need, foreseeing the obvious outcome, that starts to form like blood stains on the carpet and walls? Or is it a death sentence waiting to be delivered by oneself fulfilling prophecy.

Playing out with a teasing sense of urgency by director Marcio Beauclair (Producer, Director/Adaptation), The Rage of Narcissus finds shared terror in its dismemberment, hinting at darkness while playing with the disorder that sliced with horrific, highly sexualized poetry. It’s super smart and entangling, this formulation, playing with truth and fiction in a way that we get tricked into not seeing the autofiction as it is being played out. It’s disturbing in its rawness and overt narcissism, yet we get caught up in the unraveling and the hypertension of the moment. It digs into the mystery and makes us forget our sense of place and time. He tricks us with his vision of his own sexual sense of self, the character, and the story. It pushes us away, at points, lulling us into not caring, but then forces us back in, playing with the tale within another, and wrapping itself in shifts of light and dark that make us see the distortion rather than the true reflection. It reflects back a vision, one we might not fully enjoy seeing, but it delivers the goods dramatically, almost traumatically, sending you out into the streets wondering and thinking about Greek mythology and the narcissistic world we live in. Take that as a cautionary tale, a story dismembered of truth and packed up in a duffle bag ready to teach by counter-example.

Matthew Romantini in The Rage of Narcissus at Theatre Passe Muraille‘s Backspace May 17-28, 2023. Photo by Dahlia Katz.

For more go to frontmezzjunkies.com

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Out of Town

The Sound Inside Captivates at Toronto’s Coal Mine Theatre

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Bella slips in quietly, tasking us to keep up and give in. She paints a solid visual standing center stage and speaking directly to us, revealing layers of dynamics that are just “so good, it enrages me“ We can’t help staying tuned in, thinking and listening to The Sound Inside, as Moya O’Connell (Shaw’s Middletown) digs into her portrayal of Bella, the writer and teacher at the center of Coal Mine Theatre‘s impressively deep and profound production. Spinning the chair hypnotically, she expands our vantage point outward and inward all at the same time. Freeing up the velocity of thought inside the inevitable, this is what is on hold and delivered out within Adam Rapp’s (Nocturne, Noble Gases) delicious play, and as directed with sure-footed wisdom and expertise by Leora Morris (Coal Mine’s Knives in Hens), the piece expertly floats forward in segments, delicately ushering in the ideas of encapsulated loneliness and the acceptance of praise that resides within, ever so quietly. O’Connell gives us an intense complication that grabs hold brilliantly, even as she exists alone scribbling words of inspired wisdom when they overtake her. It makes us wonder, is this a tale manufactured under the trees late at night, or a reckoning of deep desperation, tasking us to weigh in and lay down with her in the snowy drifts.

The dynamic elegance of the ever-shifting piece, designed with an impeccable eye for distant focus by the dynamic Wes Babcock (Matchstick’s The Woodcutter), with detailed costuming by Laura Delchiaro (Shaw’s Gem of the Ocean), incredibly subtle, yet intense lighting also by Babcock, and engaging music and sound design by Chris Ross-Ewart (Stratford’s Hamlet-911), draws us in without pushing or prodding. “You can ask me something else“, states the defended and uncomfortable, as the performative nature of an intimate conversation told in a narrative structure keeps us guessing where we truly are standing and where we are going. It never gives anything away, nor holds our outreached hand as we move forward into the unknown, and it is all done with such strange intimate power by an expert cast that breathes it all in poetically.

Moya O’Connell and Aidan Correia in Coal Mine Theatre’s The Sound Inside. Photo by Tim Leyes.

It’s truly captivating in its desperate loneliness, and you can’t take your eyes or ears off her for a moment, that is until the diabolically designed Christopher, beautifully embodied by the devilishly talented Aidan Correia (Touchstone’s’s Yaga) makes his appearance, without an appointment. He’s blown in wildly, as if from a cold snowy field to shift the life of a professor who didn’t know she needed the jolt. They both leans in, giving us more illumination in their stance than most can give in a soliloquy. Correia dynamically rises to her unspoken challenge, giving us a character of undeniable boyishly handsome complications that unsettles and intrigues. His ‘Old Yeller’ reduction and his storytelling of a young man’s train ride journey into internal discovery stop us in our tracks, just as it does to the unexpected complicated Bella. We can’t help but want to look deeper into that painting, or sneak a quick peek at the next paragraph, desperately wanting to understand, while enjoying the unknown and the unexplained.

Basking in the hallowed spotlight, the perfect formulations slowly fill in the tense details of what lies in The Sound Inside. Is she writing her new novel, speaking it out loud to the tree gods for approval, or is she telling us her tale so we may understand or maybe even collude with her? Or is it something more obscure? It’s hard to tell. In some ways, you don’t want to know is the only possible response that one can truly give. That’s the quandary where we find ourselves. Balancing on one of the most beautiful wrought entanglements, we navigate a thin line of understanding hidden in the layers that exist most definitively in and upon more layers. Is it all just creation, or a story of truth and confession? Are there footprints in the snow leading us somewhere? Suffice to say that there is nothing clumsy about The Sound Inside, as the two come together in a way that will haunt your imagination as you try to make sense of the imagined and what’s written. “Count to 30“, and tell me. I do have my own conclusion, but it doesn’t have to be the right or only one. Which is just so much more perfect than an obvious idea told loudly or energetically…

Moya O’Connell and Aidan Correia in Coal Mine Theatre‘s The Sound Inside. Photo by Tim Leyes.
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Out of Town

The Chinese Lady on Dynamic Display at Crow’s Theatre, Toronto

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She sits, silent and still, full of hope, staring out as we file in to music that doesn’t quite fit the frame. We take in the visual like a crowd observing a caged peacock, delighted and intrigued, as a man sweeps the ground around her. She is newly arrived, this Chinese young woman tells us, sold for service to be displayed like a rare creature in a gilded cage. She performs with precision for the entitled colonial crowds who gasp and gaze at the exotically crafted foreigner so unusual that they gladly pay for this kind of overt exhibition. She is Afong Moy, perfectly and dynamically portrayed by Rosie Simon (Factory Theatre/ fu-GeN’s acquiesce), playing a role within a frame, presenting an ethnicity for the sole sake of cultural curiosity, hoping it will make a difference. But the air doesn’t feel right within the square, as it becomes more disturbing with each timely rotation. The years tick by as we watch with a growing sense of discomfort The Chinese Lady diving deeper and deeper into the muck of America at its worst.

Written with an expert force by Lloyd Suh (The Far Country), The Chinese Lady, now playing at Crow’s Theatre in Toronto by Studio 180 Theatre and fu-GEN Asian Canadian Theatre Company, finds power and force in the unraveling of this distinct form of scientific racism over years of confinement. It engulfs it most delicately inside a sideshow format that emphasizes the barbaric structure that has basically imprisoned the first Chinese woman to set foot on U.S. soil. And if that doesn’t bring forth discomfort, I’m not quite sure what would. Afong Moy is just 14 years old when we first are introduced to her with the help of her irrelevant manservant and guard, Atung, played with a deep sense of purpose by John Ng 伍健琪 (fu-GEN Theatre’s CHING CHONG CHINAMAN). She is alone and basically enslaved within this artifice, delivered from her now-faraway family in Guangzhou Province in 1834, and indebted to her ’employers’, although she is never paid nor is her debt ever fulfilled. She has been put on display within these four impenetrable, yet barless walls so that crowds of European Americans (a fine and brilliant distinction from Indigenous Americans) as “The Chinese Lady” to be gawked at and exploited for twenty-five cents per adult, ten cents per child.

Rosie Simon in Studio 180’s The Chinese Lady at Crow’s Theatre, Toronto. Photo by Dahlia Katz.

Next, I will eat and you will watch me“, she tells us, at first with a smile in an attempt to please, but as she winds her way through the country over decades, her celebrated sideshow experience dampens that put-upon smile, and the darkness of what is being done to her starts to envelop the stage. The framework is startling, making the applause prompted by Atung most uncomfortable and disconcerting, as if we are in on the gawking and part of the problem. And maybe we are. We are being pushed forward, into examining our role in the voyeuristic imprisonment of this woman, and with each passing year, the sentence of her servitude deepens our distress and expands our understanding of this horrific type of racism and exploitation. The “cultural importance” of her presentation, all smiles and bows, shreds its luster as we follow The Chinese Lady down an alarming dive deep into the cultural acceptability of this enslaved exploitation as we begin to witness the darkening of her mind.

The play is a compellingly disturbing unpacking, and as directed with a simple sharp grace by Marjorie Chan 陳以珏 (Gateway Theatre’s China Doll), The Chinese Ladynever lets us off the hook, pushing forth the horrors of what this country has down to women of color, whether Black, Asian, Indigenous, or otherwise. We can’t look away, not from the formulation beautifully crafted by set designer Echo Zhou 周芷會 (Studio 180’s My Sister’s Rage), with delicately determined lighting from designer Kimberly Purtell (Studio 180’s Oslo), perfectly executed costuming by Jung-Hye Kim (Factory’s Praire Nurse), and solid sound and compositions by Gloria Mok 莫嘉詠 (fu-GeN’s Walk the Walk), nor can we not see the cultural importance of how “the story goes…

Rosie Simon and John Ng in Studio 180’s The Chinese Lady at Crow’s Theatre, Toronto. Photo by Dahlia Katz.

They speak of a story that is better and more beautiful than the truth, living made up inside a deep desperate dream of China. We watch the pair live in too much hope, with little reality, and no literal hold on the truth, executing a vision that is less Chinese than the reality that they struggle to remember. Inside the director’s notes, Chan compares “Afong Moy’s relatively more ‘humane’ exhibition to the horror of ‘human zoos’ where individuals were enslaved in harrowing circumstances and put on display in often hostile surroundings.” This is an idea that horrifies beyond anything that my mind is able to comprehend. I couldn’t stop thinking of my own personal discomfort as a child when taken to the Zoo, watching imprisoned animals living out their existence in a pseudo-reality that was formed to mimic something that it was most definitely not, freedom and a true space to roam. And to fully understand the actual truth of her situation (from reading the articles made available on Studio 180’s webpage for The Chinese Lady, like this one: Afong Moy: Uncovering the History Behind The Chinese Lady), the immense weight of the abusive imprisonment of Afong Moy just gets heavier and heavier.

We are set up, in the most profound and wise manner by a playwright who has captured history and executed its design perfectly, implanting us unbeknownst as ‘cultural connoisseurs’ and ‘voyeurs’ of an uncomfortable sort, and forcing us to bear witness to the caging of The Chinese Lady. The result is upsetting, disheartening, and completely outstanding, as we sit playing out our roles seating in front of her subjugation. It’s all for the sake of some brutal inhumane cultural curiosity by a privileged colonial class who we know will eventually tire of her, and toss her away when something more exotic is presented for their amusement. Yet, this play holds us tight and never lets us look away from the barbaric curated exhibition of systematic racism and the exploitation of The Chinese Lady, the first of her kind in America. I did not know anything about Afong May and her zoo-like treatment before seeing this play, and it’s true what my theatre companion said of the play that “it’s a sobering reminder of some of the atrocities of the past against Asians in North America.” A telling that I will never forget. Worth its weight in gold and coin.

It is a beautiful thing to look at something long enough to really understand it. But it is so much more beautiful to be looked at long enough to be understood“. – The Chinese Lady by Lloyd Suh.

For more go to frontmezzjunkies.com

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