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With a super talented cast of great singers and energetic talented dancers, Escape to Margaritaville frolics onto Broadway with a sun-kissed smile and a happy easy going song. It’s basically the fun brother-in-law to the super successful Mamma Mia, with a dash of movie-style Rom-Com opposites-attract dynamic, a few shots of tequila and a whole lot of tart lime bar-mix blended to a frothy splendor. It’s not a high-end Patron margarita made with freshly squeezed limes served straight up in a martini glass, but more like a yummy frozen margarita made with cheap tequila and overly sugared bottled lime mix (and trust me on this) served in a “Tin Cup Chalice“, sure to give you a head splitting headache the morning after as you whistle a happy tune on your way to the airport. Maybe it’s the tequila, but more likely, it’s all that sugar in the mix that is to blame. But just like this show that asks the important questions, like “Why don’t we get drunk and…”, the title song and the sun drenched sentiment is there, stuck in your head for the remainder of the day.
It sure starts out fun, with the perfect strong and vibrant voice of Paul Alexander Nolan (Broadway’s Bright Star) as the cutie, Tully, strumming a guitar in cut off shorts and beckoning us with a song and a “License to Chill” into the Margaritaville Island bar, where the drink specials come daily, and the dancing to some good ol’ lively tunes never seems to end.  Tully is the grand guide for all these fun-seeking vacationers into the land of pleasure and relaxation, the maestro of this island breeze, spreading holiday romance and good times without a care in the world.  His motto is definitely not “Let’s keep in touch” (or the hilarious “Pets speak in Dutch“) but more along the lines of “romance is better enjoyed on the surface“. And that is exactly what this show is selling us from moment one, with salt on the rim and a slice of lime. Escape to Margaritaville with original and classic songs by Jimmy Buffett, doesn’t intend to go to deep in any way, shape, or form.  This show is as light as a Corona, so sit back, put on some sun-block and get ready for some Beach Blanket shenanigans. Trust me, you’ll be humming and singing the songs for days to come, especially if a show like Mamma Mia is your kind of vacation. (PS: it’s not mine).
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Lisa Howard, Alison Luff, Paul Alexander Nolan, Eric Petersen. Photo by Matthew Murphy.
In stereotypical Rom-Com fashion, beautiful but up-tight Rachel, played by the golden voiced Alison Luff (Broadway’s revival of Les Misérables), a workaholic scientist who wants to save the world, arrives on the island, not for “My Best Friend’s Wedding” but for her BBF’s pre-wedding bachelorette beach holiday. At her side, wishing for her to lighten up, is her best buddy, Tammy, played with a wise-cracking sense of adventure by Lisa Howard (Encores’ Sunday in the Park with George) who’s about to get married to a good-for-nothing bozo named Chadd (Ian Michael Stuart) who has stayed behind in the cold, watching hockey, and hoping Tammy follows the diet he has prescribed for her. Rachel has rolled her small wheelie bag straight into the perfect Rom-Com set-up, a Cameron Diaz’s “The Holiday“, one that almost feels insulting in some way.  The up-tight girl who is worried more about getting a soil sample from the volcano for her research, finding a Wi-Fi signal, and getting phone reception, can’t quite seem to chill out enough to notice the hot beach bum (yes, Nolan looks great in that part) standing right in from of her shirtless and curly haired, with a drink in his hand and a twinkle in his eye, just begging her to come seize the day with him.  We all know where this is heading, and we also know from the get-go that the adorable bartender Brick, played charmingly by Eric Petersen (Broadway’s Dewey in School of Rock) is the man Tammy is really meant for and totally deserves, cause, a la “Bridget Jones’ Diary“, “he likes me just as I am“…. So now, all we have to do is sit back, enjoy the fairly memorable tunes, listen to the ridiculous puns and jokes, and watch the love fighting struggle forward, knowing the outcome and the end result all too well, but looking forward to the roller coaster ride.
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Alison Luff and Paul Alexander Nolan. Photo by Matthew Murphy.
But boy, does Rachel change her tune fast.  So much faster than I was prepare for. All it takes is a strumming of “Three Chords” on an old guitar, and she’s kicking it back like an island pro, having the time of her life, drinking wine from a bottle, fooling around all day long, in and out of bed, and changing Tully’s outlook on romance and love without barely batting an eye.  Somewhere else on the island, Tammy and Brick are also falling for each other fast, but struggling hard to be good and faithful (dammit), a dynamic that is a lot more surprising and engaging than first imagined.  Howard’s Tammy is definitely the fun one to be around, singing loud and strong, grabbing hold of life and limb with gusto, and if I was going to be dragged along on a bachelorette party weekend at the beach, she is the one I’d want to have my “Cheeseburger in Paradise” with.
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Lisa Howard. Photo by Matthew Murphy.
Also on deck for some more push-and-pull flirty games is the owner of this run-down resort, the sassy lady of the island, Marley, played exactly how this lady should be played by the enjoyable Rema Webb (Broadway’s Violet) sparing forever with the Hemingway-esque older beach bum and resident drunk, J. D., played like the old rascal he is by The Polynesian Serenaders band member, Don Sparks (Broadway’s Take Me Out).  Nothing is out of place here, the songs are well done, the setting is as colorfully tropical as you can get for a Club Med kind of falling apart island resort, strongly designed by Walt Spangler (Broadway’s Tuck Everlasting), bright colored costumes by Paul Tazewell (Hamilton), lighting designed by Howell Binkley (Prince of Broadway) and earth shaking sound design by Brian Ronan (War Paint), although only a few of these well performed songs (music supervisor/vocal & incidental music arranger/additional orchestrations by Christopher Jahnke) registered in my mind as recognizable beyond one or two of the classic variety, the energetic ensemble is strong and playful with enjoyable and energetic dance moves courtesy of star choreographer, Kelly Devine (Come From Away, Rock of Ages), and faster than you can say, “Sweet Home Alabama“, act one comes to a earth shaking end, leaving us joyfully happy, wondering (but not to hard) how this will all come to an end, and just how many drinks do we need to have at intermission to keep us smiling to the end.
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Andre Ward (center). Photo by Matthew Murphy.

There are odd bits and pieces here and there; dancing clouds, trippy businessmen, sweet gay tourists (I happily think I saw), and a strangely designed plane, left for us to try to sort out and make sense of. There are some clever bits of action and dialogue pulled out from the lyrics and tossed back at us with a big wide wink that give a chuckle, and the playful jokes are obvious but funny.  The all-around handyman/dishwasher/masseuse, Jamal, played with a tropical twang and broad silly appeal by Andre Wark (Broadway’s Something Rotten!) saunters in and out, cracking a joke, and singing some enjoyable songs but most of his moments, and a few other scenes throughout, feel overly complicated, pointless and discardable.  He is given a great song, “Volcano” to start the second act with, and as the others scamper around him afraid of what is coming, he holds our attention center stage with ease and charm. That’s basically how the whole second act starts to feel.  The story lines start climbing on top of one another, and instead of getting untangled under the “Moonstruck” sky, they seem to become more and more complicated and convoluted the further you travel away from the island.  One starts to wonder how the book writers and director, Christopher Ashley (Come From Away, Memphis) plan to tie this all up in the end. Instead of trusting in the construct of love they have steadily created with Rachel and her “10 Things I Hate About You” reasons for saying ‘no’, Escape to Margaritaville adds a twist that doesn’t fully resonate, something along the lines of ‘love won’t come to you unless you are a successful award-winning singer/songwriter’, and not just a beach bum on an island singing “It’s Five O’Clock Somewhere” drinking songs to tourists. Tully’s second act rise is as fast as Rachel’s first act fall into his loving arms, and although somewhat insulting in structure and meaning, the two leads, filled to the brim with awesome talent and incredible voices, sell us their story solidly and with the ease of a good bartender serving up a “Cocktail” like Tom Cruise.  Without the four leads at the wheel of this thing, this trip with the free wheeling Buffett might have been a disaster, “Definitely, Maybe“.

The book by Greg Garcia (TV’s ‘Raising Hope‘) and Mike O’Malley (Showtime’s ‘Shameless‘) doesn’t complicate things too much in the beginning, following the wise instructions from Tully himself, “the deeper you go, the less interesting it gets“, but for act two, the tequila must have gotten to their heads. Two much sugar and not enough sass leads them down to a Mamma Mia 2 Here We Go Again style finale, back on the island and a wedding to be had.  I’m not sure it had to go down that often trodden pathway to the alter, in the same way that so many of the elements feel borrowed and blue, much like the cute tap dance number, and the island ceremony in the final scene, but we knew somehow we would have to make it back to the beach for the finale. This show couldn’t end in the cold, but I did start to feel a bit of the headache coming on early with this oh-so-typical device and the winding island road we had to take to get there. You do walk out though, sun-drenched and feeling good, with the classic Jimmy Buffet song, “Margaritaville” lodged solidly in your head, so you know this has been a job well done, or should I say, a sunny island vacation done right. We might regret the amount of tequila-laden sugar we had to swallow to get back there, bemoaning the throbbing in our head the next day, and cry out “My Head Hurts, My Feet Stink and I Don’t Love Jesus” anymore, but that beach party was pretty darn fun and pretty much worth the flight. Even if I don’t remember the details the day after.
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Lisa Howard, Eric Petersen and the original Broadway cast of Escape to Margaritaville. Photo by Matthew Murphy.

For more go to frontmezzjunkies.com

My love for theater started when I first got involved in high school plays and children's theatre in London, Ontario, which led me—much to my mother’s chagrin—to study set design, directing, and arts administration at York University in Toronto. But rather than pursuing theater as a career (I did produce and design a wee bit), I became a self-proclaimed theater junkie and life-long supporter. I am not a writer by trade, but I hope to share my views and feelings about this amazing experience we are so lucky to be able to see here in NYC, and in my many trips to London, Enlgand, Chicago, Toronto, Washington, and beyond. Living in London, England from 1985 to 1986, NYC since 1994, and on my numerous theatrical obsessive trips to England, I've seen as much theater as I can possibly afford. I love seeing plays. I love seeing musicals. If I had to choose between a song or a dance, I'd always pick the song. Dance—especially ballet—is pretty and all, but it doesn’t excite me as, say, Sondheim lyrics. But that being said, the dancing in West Side Story is incredible! As it seems you all love a good list, here's two. FAVORITE MUSICALS (in no particular order): Sweeney Todd with Patti Lupone and Michael Cerveris in 2005. By far, my most favorite theatrical experience to date. Sunday in the Park with George with Jenna Russell (who made me sob hysterically each and every one of the three times I saw that production in England and here in NYC) in 2008 Spring Awakening with Jonathan Groff and Lea Michele in 2007 Hedwig and the Angry Inch (both off-Boadway in 1998 and on Broadway in 2014, with Neal Patrick Harris, but also with Michael C. Hall and John Cameron Mitchell, my first Hedwig and my last...so far), Next To Normal with Alice Ripley (who I wish I had seen in Side Show) in 2009 FAVORITE PLAYS (that’s more difficult—there have been so many and they are all so different): Angels in American, both on Broadway and off Lettice and Lovage with Dame Maggie Smith and Margaret Tyzack in 1987 Who's Afraid of Virginai Woolf with Tracy Letts and Amy Morton in 2012 Almost everything by Alan Ayckbourn, but especially Woman in Mind with Julia McKenzie in 1986 And to round out the five, maybe Proof with Mary Louise Parker in 2000. But ask me on a different day, and I might give you a different list. These are only ten theatre moments that I will remember for years to come, until I don’t have a memory anymore. There are many more that I didn't or couldn't remember, and I hope a tremendous number more to come. Thanks for reading. And remember: read, like, share, retweet, enjoy. For more go to frontmezzjunkies.com

Broadway

Broadway in Bryant Park And You Are There With Hell’s Kitchen, Water For Elephants, The Wiz and More

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July 11, 106.7 LITE FM’s Broadway in Bryant Park kicked off its 2024 program, bringing the best of Broadway back together for free performances, every Thursday in July.

From AMDA College of the Performing Arts-Kyle Taylor Parker

From AMDA College of the Performing Arts-Kyle Taylor Parker, Charity Arianna , Destiny David, Ailadis Hernandez De Leon, Nyjair Wilkerson and Jackson Bateman

This week’s performances included: a preshow featuring students from AMDA

Ali Louis Bourzgui

Bobby Conte and Ali Louis Bourzgui

Bobby Conte, Ali Louis Bourzgui and Adam Jacobs

Ali Louis Bourzgui, Bobby Conte,

Lily Kren, Alexandra Matteo, Daniel Quadrino, Jenna Nicole Schoen, Nathan Lucrezio, Reagan Pender, Bobby Conte, Tyler James Eisenreich, Mark Mitrano, Haley Gustafson, Afra Hines, Dee Tomasetta, Adam Jacobs, Ali Louis Bourzgui, David Paul Kidder, Jeremiah Alsop, Andrew Tufano and Ronnie Bowman, Jr.

The Who’s Tommy (Ali Louis Bourzgui, Adam Jacobs, Bobby Conte, Haley Gustafson and more)

Isabelle McCalla and Ken Wulf Clark

Ken Wulf Clark

Joe De Paul and Asa Somers

Isabelle McCalla and Ken Wulf Clark

Isabelle McCalla and Ken Wulf Clark

Isabelle McCalla and Ken Wulf Clark

Joe De Paul, Asa Somers and Sara Gettelfinger

Joe De Paul, Asa Somers and Sara Gettelfinger

Joe De Paul, Asa Somers and Sara Gettelfinger

Joe De Paul, Asa Somers and Sara Gettelfinger

Ken Wulf Clark, Sara Gettelfinger, Joe De Paul and Asa Somers

Ken Wulf Clark, Sara Gettelfinger, Joe De Paul and Asa Somers

Ken Wulf Clark, Joe De Paul, Asa Somers and Isabella McCalla

Water for Elephants (Isabelle McCalla, Ken Wulf Clark, Asa Somers, Sara Gettelfinger, Joe De Paul)

Avery Wilson

Kyle Ramar Freeman and Nichelle Lewis

Kyle Ramar Freeman

Kyle Ramar Freeman

Melody A. Betts

Kyle Ramar Freeman

Nichelle Lewis

Nichelle Lewis, Kyle Ramar Freeman, Avery Wilson and Polanco Jones Jr.

Kyle Ramar Freeman, Avery Wilson and Polanco Jones Jr.

Kyle Ramar Freeman, Polanco Jones Jr., Nichelle Lewis, Melody A. Betts and Avery Wilson

The Wiz (Avery Wilson, Kyle Ramar Freeman, Melody A. Betts, Nichelle Lewis, Polanco Jones Jr.)

Jelani Remy

JJ Niemann

Evan Alexander Smith and JJ Niemann

Evan Alexander Smith and JJ Niemann

Evan Alexander Smith and JJ Niemann

Evan Alexander Smith and JJ Niemann

Jelani Remy and JJ Niemann

Jelani Remy and JJ Niemann

Jelani Remy and JJ Niemann

Evan Alexander Smith, Katie Laduca, JJ Niemann and Aaron Alcaraz

Hannah Kevitt and JJ Niemann

Evan Alexander Smith, JJ Niemann, Jelani Remy and The Cast of Back To The Future that includes Hannah Kevitt, Cixtoria Byrd, Kimberly Immanuel, Jessie Peltier, Gregory Carl Banks Jr., Katie Laduca, Joshua Kenneth Allen Johnson and Aaron Alcaraz

Evan Alexander Smith, JJ Niemann, Jelani Remy, Hannah Kevitt, Cixtoria Byrd, Kimberly Immanuel, Jessie Peltier, Gregory Carl Banks Jr., Katie Laduca, Joshua Kenneth Allen Johnson and Aaron Alcaraz

Back to the Future (Jelani Remy, JJ Niemann, Evan Alexander Smith)

Gianna Harris and Lamont Walker II

Lamont Walker II

Jade Milan, Jackie Leon and Gianna Harris

Jade Milan, Jackie Leon and Gianna Harris

Donna Vivino

Donna Vivino

Donna Vivino, Gianna Harris, Lamont Walker II, Jade Milan and Jackie Leon and Jackie Leon

and Hell’s Kitchen (Gianna Harris, Vanessa Ferguson, Jackie Leon, Donna Vivino, Lamont Walker II)

106.7 Lite FM’s Helen Little

106.7 Lite FM’s Helen Little is joined by Co Host Kyle Ramar Freeman

with host Helen Little and co-host Kyle Ramar Freeman.

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Broadway

Get Ready For Broadway in Bryant Park

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The most popular shows on and off Broadway will perform their biggest hits in the park starting this Thursday the 11th! Head to the the lawn at Bryant Park and enjoy Broadway for lunch. The performances will happen on four summer Thursdays, hosted and presented by LiteFM.

This week from 12:30pm-1:30pm 106.7 LITE FM Host: Helen Little will host. For the pre-show: A special performance by the students of AMDA College of the Performing Arts. Then get ready for performances by Back to the Future, Hell’s Kitchen, The Who’s TOMMY, The Wiz and
Water For Elephants.

In coming weeks look from The Outsiders, SIX: The Musical, Moulin Rouge! The Musical, Wicked, Chicago and & Juliet.

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Broadway

Ken Fallin’s Broadway:​ Happy Birthday Audra McDonald

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On July 3rd, Audra McDonald celebrated her 54th birthday. The 1970 American Tony, Grammy and Emmy Award-winning theatrical and operatic singer, and stage and screen actress (Lady Day At Emerson’s Bar and Grill; Sweeney Todd; Rise and Fall of the City of Mahagonny; TV Private Practice, The Good Wife), was born in West Berlin, West Germany (now Berlin, Germany)

As been announced six-time Tony Award winner Audra McDonald will return to Broadway this fall, as Mama Rose in Gypsy.

Performances begin Thursday, November 21st, at Broadway’s newly renovated Majestic Theatre. Happy Thanksgiving! The show will open on Thursday, December 19th. Merry Christmas and Happy Chanukah.

The last show to play the Majestic Theatre was The Phantom of the Opera, which concluded its 35 year-run on April 16, 2023.

This upcoming revival will be directed by the legendary five-time Tony Award-winning director George C. Wolfe. The choreography will be by four-time Tony Award nominated Camille A. Brown.  Additional casting and creative team members will be announced at a later date.

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Coming In August Broadway Barks Returns to Shubert Alley

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The 26th anniversary of the star-studded dog and cat adoption event, Broadway Barks returns to Shubert Alley on Saturday, August 3, 2024 to benefit New York City animal rescue groups. The event, co-founded by Bernadette Peters and Mary Tyler Moore, features Broadway celebrities who use their star power to help find loving homes for animals in need from 24 NYC area adoption and rescue groups.

Bernadette Peters and Sutton Foster. Photo courtesy of Broadway Barks.

Bernadette Peters and Sutton Foster will co-host this year’s festivities! Other celebrity participants to be announced soon.

Photo by Daniel Roberts, © Broadway Cares/Equity Fights AIDS.

Barks begins at 3pm with a ‘meet and greet’ of all the adoptable pets; from 5–6:30pm, adoptees make their Broadway debut on stage alongside some of Broadway’s favorite stars for the celebrity presentations.Produced by Broadway Cares/Equity Fights AIDS, the adoption event takes place in Shubert Alley (located between 44th and 45th Streets, between Broadway and Eighth Avenues).

Photo by Daniel Roberts, © Broadway Cares/Equity Fights AIDS.

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Shows to Keep Your Eyes On: Midnight in the Garden of Good and Evil, Death Becomes Her and The Queen of Versailles

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The new musical Midnight in the Garden of Good and Evil is based on John Berendt’s 1994 non-fiction book and makes its world premiere this summer at Chicago’s Goodman Theatre. The book is by  Taylor Mac and music and lyrics by Tony winner Jason Robert Brown, performances are scheduled for June 25–August 4 in the Albert Theatre. Tony winner Rob Ashford will direct the production with choreography by Tanya Birl.

Tony winner J. Harrison Ghee, is The Lady Chablis; Tony nominee Tom Hewitt as Jim Williams; and Olivier nominee Sierra Boggess as Emma Dawes.

The company also includes Lance Roberts (The Best Man) as Bobby Lewis, Austin Colby (The Great Gatsby) as Danny Hansford, Bailee Endebrock (Parade) as Corrine Strong, Shanel Bailey (The Book of Mormon) as Lavella Cole, Jessica Molaskey (Sunday in the Park with George) as Alma Knox Carter, Brianna Buckley (the ripple, the wave that carried me home) as Minerva, Mary Ernster (War Paint) as Serena Barnes/Dawn Avery, McKinley Carter (Turn of the Century) as Vera Strong, Maya Bowles (The Wiz) as Stacey Brown, DeMarius Copes (Some Like It Hot) as Jeremiah Jones, Sean Donovan as Luther Driggers, Jason Michael Evans (Anastasia tour) as Colonel Atwood/Burt, Christopher Kelley as Bubbles/Gregory, Andre Terrell Malcolm (Hamilton tour) as Josiah Domingo, Aaron James McKenzie (A Beautiful Noise) as Jethro Myles, Wes Olivier as Jack the One-Eyed Jill, Kayla Marie Shipman as Millicent/Mary, and Rory Shirley as Stefanie Davis.

The show tracks an antiques dealer through four trials for murdering a male prostitute in Savannah, Georgia. The story is modeled on the real-life shooting of Daniel Lewis  Hansford. The work won the 1995 Boeke Prize and was a finalist for the 1995 Pulitzer Prize for non-fiction. A film adaptation was released in 1997 starring John Cusack and Kevin Spacey.

Midnight in the Garden of Good and Evil was a seminal book for me as a young queer person, coming out in the late 1980s and early ’90s,” added Mac. “The eccentricities of Savannah, and how they were celebrated by such a large readership, seemed to say, the things that made me odd and an outcast in the world were actually things I should cherish. Likewise, musical theatre has always had a similar effect on me. Singing our thoughts is such an eccentric way of expressing ourselves—yet so perfectly aligned with my personal liberation and joy. So turning Midnight into a musical, and with such master craftspeople as Jason, Rob, and Tanya is essentially an extension of celebrating the joy and liberation from exposing what’s hidden.”

“When I am deciding to start a new show, the two most important questions I ask myself are: 1) Does it sing? and 2) Do I get to work with fun people? With Midnight in the Garden of Good and Evil, I knew the answers to both questions immediately,” stated Brown. “The book’s milieu, so rich with mystery and romance and history, sings with every sentence, deeply passionate, slyly comic, emotions threatening to boil over on every page. And to work with Rob Ashford, whose transformative production of Parade at the Donmar Warehouse in 2007 reinvigorated not only the show’s reputation but my creative process, was a no-brainer. But then add to that the brilliant, joyful, radically inclusive mind of Taylor Mac, and there was no way I could resist. Creating this world with these mad geniuses is, in true Savannah tradition, a grand and great party. I can’t wait for the world to join in.”

Madeline Ashton (Tony Award® nominees Megan Hilty (Wicked, “Smash”)) is the most beautiful actress (just ask her) ever to grace the stage and screen. Helen Sharp (Jennifer Simard (Company, Disaster!)) is the long-suffering author (just ask her) who lives in her shadow. They have always been the best of frenemies…until Madeline steals Helen’s fiancé (Christopher Sieber (Spamalot, Company)) away. As Helen plots revenge and Madeline clings to her rapidly fading star, their world is suddenly turned upside down by Viola Van Horn, a mysterious woman with a secret that’s to die for.

After one sip of Viola’s (Grammy® Award winner Michelle Williams (Destiny’s Child, Chicago)) magical potion, Madeline and Helen begin a new era of life (and death) with their youth and beauty restored…and a grudge to last eternity.

Death Becomes Her, based on the classic 1992 film, is a drop-dead hilarious new musical comedy about friendship, love, and burying the hatchet…again, and again, and again.

Life’s a bitch and then you die. Or not!

Death Becomes Her is coming to the Lunt-Fontanne Theatre on October 23, 2024, ahead of an opening night on November 21, 2024.

The Queen of Versailles, the new Stephen Schwartz musical starring Kristin Chenoweth and F. Murray Abraham as billionarie-couple Jackie and David Siegel, begins performances at Boston’s Emerson Colonial Theatre on July 16 and will now run through August 25.

The cast will feature Stephen DeRosa (Boardwalk Empire) as John, Greg Hildreth (Company) as Gary, Tatum Grace Hopkins as Jonquil, Tony Award nominee Isabel Keating (The Boy from Oz) as Debbie, Melody Butiu as Sofia Flores and Nina White as Victoria Siegel.

The company will also include Anna Bakun, Stacie Bono, Yeman Brown, Amanda Jane Cooper, David Aron Damane, Drew Elhamalawy, Sara Esty, K.J. Hippensteel, Diana Huey, Cassondra James, Andrew Kober, Jesse Kovarsky, Pablo David Laucerica, Travis Murad Leland, Michael Mulheren, Michael McCorry Rose and Grace Slear.

The Queen of Versailles is an adaptation of the 2012 documentary of the same name about socialite Jacqueline “Jackie” Siegel, the book is by Lindsey Ferrentino (Ugly Lies the Bone) and direction by Tony winner Michael Arden (Parade).

From computer engineer to Mrs. Florida to billionairess, Jackie Siegel sees herself as the embodiment of the American Dream. Now, as the wife of David “The Timeshare King” Siegel and mother of their eight children, they invite us to behold their most grandiose venture yet: They’re building the largest private home in America in Orlando, Florida—a $100 million house big enough for her dreams and inspired by the Palace of Versailles. But with the Great Recession of 2008 looming, Jackie and David’s dreams begin to crumble, along with their lavish lifestyle. The Queen of Versailles explores the true cost of fame, fortune and family.

The production will feature choreography by Lauren Yalango-Grant and Christopher Cree Grant, music supervision by Mary-Mitchell Campbell, scenic design by Dane Laffrey, lighting design by Natasha Katz and sound design by Peter Hylenski, as well as costume design by fashion designer Christian Cowan.

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