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He Says: Steppenwolf and Second Stage Move Us into Linda Vista

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Helping move someone into an apartment eight shows a week is a trial for any friend, new or old, and in Steppenwolf’s production of Linda Vista, as they bring in the boxes and the rug, we feel for the kind hearted friend, Paul, played wisely by the excellent Jim True-Frost (Broadway’s Buried Child). His buddy, the central character in this funny detailed exploration of middle-aged desperation, is a bloke named Wheeler, strongly portrayed by the forceful Ian Barford (Broadway’s Curious Incident…) and he, in a nutshell, is no picnic to engage with, even when not age-inappropriately dressed. As written with dynamic energy and force by the expertly aligned Tracy Letts (August: Osage County, Mary Page Marlowe), Wheeler is one of the more difficult people to want to spend time with, let alone more than two hours. Somehow though, much to our surprise, this dark comedy finds its way to respecting itself, giving us a lot to laugh and connect with, even when the dynamic is somewhat forced, sad, and/or pathetic at times, with a leading man that is a complete and utter Dick, and not just by his given name. Although, this is “just my point of view“, and not “an objective truth“.

STEPPENWOLF'S PRODUCTION OF LINDA VISTA BY TRACY LETTS DIRECTED BY DEXTER BULLARD WITH IAN BARFORD, SALLY MURPHY, CAROLINE NEFF, CHANTAL THUY, JIM TRUE-FROST, CORA VANDER BROEK, TROY WEST

As directed with full-frontal force and deliberation by Dexter Bullard (Broadway’s Grace), this mixed bag of toxic masculinity and comedic midlife crisis revolves around the impossible Wheeler and the interactions he somehow has with the women in his life, all basically orbiting around that two bedroom apartment in a typically dull development called Linda Vista. One has to wonder if these interesting women have no standards or respect for themselves giving this man the time of day, even if, or especially because one has a Masters Degree in Happiness? Or are there other more compelling reasons for them to continue to interact with this disastrous male piece of work? He doesn’t seem all that likable, saying all the wrong things, even when he’s right, nor does he like so many things that other people like, a passing thought I can fully relate to when discussing karaoke. But when the delightfully fun and engaging Jules, played to yogi-optimistic perfection by Cora Vander Broek (TimeLine Theatre’s All My Sons) sees in him a turtle who has lost its shell, I wonder about all the bad choices made in our “Barry Lyndon” love-lives. One would hope, that through introspection, which he does not seem to have, these women might try to shed some light on their own internalized fear and inner respect, and stay clear of the damaged soul that lives in Linda Vista.

Linda Vista

The script of this unexpected multi-dimensional love affair sing in a way that the karaoke ballads that bring the two central figures together do not. Forcibly set up by Wheeler’s married friends, Paul and Margaret, eclectically portrayed by an empowered Sally Murphy (LCT’s Admissions), the blind date relationship disaster-in-the-making between Wheeler and Jules unwinds in a hilariously bizarre interpersonal dynamic, making the line “you don’t understand” ring far truer than maybe intended.  It’s surprisingly authentic, that first romp, in its intimate mess of connection, feeling true and awkward within minutes of the other. That is, until a late night knock on the door by the troubled neighbor, Minnie, played clearly by the wonderfully dysfunctional Chantal Thuy (DC’s “Black Lightning”) who has, in Wheeler’s own words, “that runaway look”, throws the apartment into a disordered home for the lost and stranded. Some of it is heartbreakingly authentic,  mostly in the first half of this long winded but well written play, while other moments that come later flip quietly into creepy fantasy and masculine wish fulfillment that feels a little too haphazard to swallow.

Linda Vista

Rotating around the different aspects of Wheeler’s hard to fathom life as he attempts to learn to love where he finds himself, Linda Vista, succinctly designed by Todd Rosenthal (Broadway’s Straight White Men), with detailed costuming by Laura Bauer (Broadway’s Top Girls), strong lighting by Marcus Doshi (Steppenwolf’s Familiar), and solid sound design by Richard Woodbury (Broadway’s Talk Radio), attempts to give each story a beautiful inhalation of fullness and gravity. Exposed and developed with integrity, Linda Vista takes its time giving you more than just an examination of one man’s obnoxious journey to find his formulation and function in the world. He finds understanding and interest in the female counterpoints, and digs in solidly. The strong willed Anita, determinedly portrayed with authority by Caroline Neff (Broadway’s Airline Highway), even when given an auxiliary placement within Wheeler’s work place, a camera shop that doesn’t ever seem to have a customer, finds the depth of details to wind out her story. “I’ve managed a lifetime of Michaels“, she says, letting the distraught Wheeler know that, although she appreciates his attempts at kindness, she is fully capable to handle the world around her. It’s not easy, as we see within the disgusting moments of hearing the ugly demeaning words spewed out by the oblivious bossman, Michael, carefully played by a wise Troy West (Barrow Street’s Bug) who barely registers an understanding that he is being entirely inappropriate on so many levels. In Anita’s struggling and steadfast eyes, he is just another obstacle she has had to navigate in order to try to remain sober and strong.

STEPPENWOLF'S PRODUCTION OF
LINDA VISTA
BY
TRACY LETTS
DIRECTED BY
DEXTER BULLARD
WITH
IAN BARFORD, SALLY MURPHY, CAROLINE NEFF, CHANTAL THUY, JIM TRUE-FROST, CORA VANDER BROEK, TROY WEST

Letts has the most compelling manner with a turn of an angry or intriguing phrase and the dig of privilege and power over those around, particularly in the land of Linda Vista. From his fascinating destructive force named Wheeler to the women who seem to gather around him, I’m not sure I would be loyal to his persona, and I might pretend to be busy with any other obligation if he called to ask for help when moving out from his family’s garage into his own apartment. Although I wouldn’t have to worry, as Wheeler wouldn’t be surprised or shocked. He would probably do the same thing, unless you are a woman that he finds somewhat appealing or one that he can play ‘white knight’. He works hard to keep them around him, and oddly enough, as his friend says with amazement, he has an extraordinary luck with these women. I personally found all their stories fascinating, and intriguing, but when Wheeler finally limped off into the California sunset, I was glad to say good bye.  He may be a liberal, loud mouthed and self righteous, but he is one difficult Dick to be around.

Linda Vista

For more, go to frontmezzjunkies.com

My love for theater started when I first got involved in high school plays and children's theatre in London, Ontario, which led me—much to my mother’s chagrin—to study set design, directing, and arts administration at York University in Toronto. But rather than pursuing theater as a career (I did produce and design a wee bit), I became a self-proclaimed theater junkie and life-long supporter. I am not a writer by trade, but I hope to share my views and feelings about this amazing experience we are so lucky to be able to see here in NYC, and in my many trips to London, Enlgand, Chicago, Toronto, Washington, and beyond. Living in London, England from 1985 to 1986, NYC since 1994, and on my numerous theatrical obsessive trips to England, I've seen as much theater as I can possibly afford. I love seeing plays. I love seeing musicals. If I had to choose between a song or a dance, I'd always pick the song. Dance—especially ballet—is pretty and all, but it doesn’t excite me as, say, Sondheim lyrics. But that being said, the dancing in West Side Story is incredible! As it seems you all love a good list, here's two. FAVORITE MUSICALS (in no particular order): Sweeney Todd with Patti Lupone and Michael Cerveris in 2005. By far, my most favorite theatrical experience to date. Sunday in the Park with George with Jenna Russell (who made me sob hysterically each and every one of the three times I saw that production in England and here in NYC) in 2008 Spring Awakening with Jonathan Groff and Lea Michele in 2007 Hedwig and the Angry Inch (both off-Boadway in 1998 and on Broadway in 2014, with Neal Patrick Harris, but also with Michael C. Hall and John Cameron Mitchell, my first Hedwig and my last...so far), Next To Normal with Alice Ripley (who I wish I had seen in Side Show) in 2009 FAVORITE PLAYS (that’s more difficult—there have been so many and they are all so different): Angels in American, both on Broadway and off Lettice and Lovage with Dame Maggie Smith and Margaret Tyzack in 1987 Who's Afraid of Virginai Woolf with Tracy Letts and Amy Morton in 2012 Almost everything by Alan Ayckbourn, but especially Woman in Mind with Julia McKenzie in 1986 And to round out the five, maybe Proof with Mary Louise Parker in 2000. But ask me on a different day, and I might give you a different list. These are only ten theatre moments that I will remember for years to come, until I don’t have a memory anymore. There are many more that I didn't or couldn't remember, and I hope a tremendous number more to come. Thanks for reading. And remember: read, like, share, retweet, enjoy. For more go to frontmezzjunkies.com

Broadway

Stephen Schwartz To Be Inducted into The Long Island Music and Entertainment Hall of Fame

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Legendary Award Winning Broadway and Movie Music Composer Stephen Schwartz (Wicked, Godspell, Pippin) will be inducted into the Long Island Music and Entertainment Hall of Fame (LIMEHOF) on Saturday, March 23rd, 2024 at 7pm.

There will also be concert emceed by Musician Paul Shaffer (from the David Letterman Show) who worked with Schwartz early in his career.

Schwartz has won 4 Grammys and 3 Oscars among other awards in his career that spans over 50 years both on Broadway and on the silver screen. Additionally, Schwartz has contributed music and lyrics to several movies such as “Pocahontas” (1995), “The Hunchback of Notre Dame” (1996), “The Prince of Egypt” (1998), and “Enchanted” (2007).He was also involved with the upcoming feature film adaptation of Wicked to be released in the fall.

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Broadway

Ani DiFranco and Lola Tung Join Hadestown

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The Tony and Grammy Award®-winning Best Musical Hadestown is currently stars Grammy Award winner Ani DiFranco as Persephone singing “Our Lady Of The Underground”.

 Lola Tung (“The Summer I Turned Pretty”) as Eurydice, Jordan Fisher (Dear Evan Hansen, Grease: Live,) as Orpheus here singing “All I’ve Ever Known”.

Grammy Award nominee Phillip Boykin as Hades, and Tony Award winner Lillias White as Hermes.

They are joined by Belén Moyano, Kay Trinidad, and Brit West as the Fates. The chorus of Workers is played by Emily Afton, Malcolm Armwood, Chibueze Ihuoma, Alex Puette, and Grace Yoo. The cast includes swings Sojourner Brown, Brandon Cameron, Tara Jackson, Max Kumangai, Alex Lugo, and Tanner Ray Wilson.

Hadestown originated as Anaïs Mitchell’s indie theater project that toured Vermont which she then turned into an acclaimed album. With Rachel Chavkin, her artistic collaborator, Hadestown has been transformed into a genre-defying new musical that blends modern American folk music with New Orleans-inspired jazz to reimagine a sweeping ancient tale.

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Broadway

Live From The Edison Hotel Times Square Chronicles Presents Goes Live With Bonnie Comley and Stewart F. Lane

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Photo of Bonnie Comley, Stewart F. Lane and Suzanna Bowling

“Live From The Edison Hotel Times Square Chronicles Presents”, is a new show that is filmed live every Wednesday from 5 – 6 in the lobby of the iconic Hotel Edison, before a live audience. We will run the video on our site every Thursday and then it moves onto the podcast networks.

In this episode T2C’s publisher and owner Suzanna Bowling talks with Broadway royalty and longtime married couple Bonnie Comley and Stewart F. Lane. We talk about the Palace Theatre, Broadway HD and so much more.

We were also so excited because the show and our guests are now featured on the TV screens in the lobby and the hotel rooms.

I am so grateful to my guests Bonnie and Stewart for joining me. Thank-you Magda Katz for videoing and creating the content to go live, the audience who showed up to support us, Rommel Gopez and The Edison Hotel for their kindness and hospitality.

We hope to see you there on February 21st for our guests the creator of Times Square and Hampton Fashion Week Dee Rivera, Celebrity hairstylist Samantha Smoker and Fashion Designer Shani Grosz.

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Book Reviews

Live From The Edison Hotel Times Square Chronicles Presents Stewart F. Lane and Bonnie Comley

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I am so pleased to announce our guests for Valentine’s Day are Stewart F. Lane and Bonnie Comley, the founders of BroadwayHD.com, an online streaming service on a mission to promote and preserve live theatre, extending the reach of Broadway and Broadway-caliber shows to anyone, anywhere. BroadwayHD currently has a catalog of over 300 full-length stage plays and musicals available for streaming on demand, so when you can’t get to Broadway, go to BroadwayHD on your tv, phone, or tablet!

Mr. Lane and Ms. Comley have collectively produced over 40 films and 45 Broadway shows, garnering nine Tony Awards and another 14 Tony nominations. They have also won Olivier Awards, Drama Desk, Drama
League, and Outer Critics Circle Awards for their stage productions. Lane has co-owned Broadway’s famous Palace Theater for almost 40 years.

The theater community has honored the couple for their philanthropic work, including The Actors Fund Medal of Honor, The Drama League Special Contribution to the Theater Award, The Paul Newman Award from Arts Horizons, and The Theater Museum Distinguished Service Award. The stage at Boston University’s new theater center is named in their honor, as is the Music Theater Program. The Musical Theater Society Room bears their name at Emerson College, and the 500-seat theater at the University
of Massachusetts Lowell is known as the Comley Lane Theater. Lane is a recipient of the Distinguished Alumni Award at Boston University, and Comley is Distinguished Alumni of both Emerson College and UMass Lowell.

Mr. Lane is a theater historian and playwright and has written the critically acclaimed “Black Broadway: African Americans on the Great White Way” (Square One Publishers), “Jews on Broadway” (McFarland Publishers), “Let’s Put on a Show” (Working Arts Library), and the plays “In The Wings (published in spring 2008 by Hal Leonard), “If It Was Easy” (published by Performing Books and nominated for Best New Play by the American Theatre Critics Association), and the musical “Back Home Again” (with music
and lyrics by John Denver) which he was awarded The 2011 John Denver Spirit Award for his work.

“Live From The Edison Hotel Times Square Chronicles Presents”, is a new show that will be filmed live every Wednesday from 5 – 6 in the lobby of the iconic Hotel Edison, before a live audience. To see our first episode click here.

Originally our guest was Maury Yeston, but he had to reschedule. He will be our guest at a later date, however Stewart F. Lane and Bonnie Comley, our guests for Valentine’s Day could not be more perfect. They are the epitome or Love and Broadway.

See you at The Edison Hotel.

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Broadway

Chita Will Be Honored As Lights Dim

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Broadway will dim its marquee lights to honor the two-time Tony-winning star of the original West Side Story Chita Rivera. This iconic star died January 30 at the age of 91.

The dimming of Broadway marquees will occur for the traditional one minute on Saturday, February 17 at 7:45 p.m./ET.

“Chita Rivera was Broadway royalty, and we will miss her with all our hearts,” said Charlotte St. Martin, President of The Broadway League. “For nearly seven decades she enthralled generations of audiences with her spellbinding performances and iconic roles. The triple threat actor, singer, and dancer leaves behind an incredible legacy of work for which she was honored with a Special Tony Award for Lifetime Achievement.”

Rivera’s Broadway career began in 1950 with Guys and Dolls. Her signature role came in 1957 when she played the original “Anita” in West Side Story. Other Broadway credits include Bye Bye Birdie, Chicago, Kiss of the Spiderwoman, The Visit and The Rink. She was nominated for 10 Tony Awards, winning for The Rink in 1984 and Kiss of the Spider Woman in 1993. She received the Special Tony Award for Lifetime Achievement in 2018.

We give you the talented Ken Fallin’s drawing of Chita in The Visit.

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