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Things to Consider Before Playing Mobile Casino Games

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Playing Casino online is setting a new trend nowadays. You might have been to Vegas or any place where you have got this craze for casinos or gambling but due to abstinence policy regarding casinos in your regions is you could not suffice your cravings for the same. But this is the era of the internet and everything is possible on it. If you search for casino or gambling online you may find that there are a lot of sites and mobile games online where you can gamble online instead of driving to a casino. There are several platforms where a user can gamble online on their PC as well as mobile phones.

Playing casino games on mobile is more convenient than a PC or laptop as you can always have access to online gambling with your fingertips. There a lot of mobile sites which offer a genuine and reliable platform to gamble online but choosing the best ones is really a dilemma. So, we would start with the first thing which should be kept in mind is:

1. Choosing the Best Mobile Casino Sites

When you are betting your real money and want to earn in gambling you need to sure that you are using the best mobile casino sites. So you have to some research online to find the best mobile casino site. But instead of wasting your precious time you can check on my mobi casino as it has enlisted the world’s best mobile casino sites. 

2. Safe and Secure 

Once you have chosen the mobile casino sites from the site we have mentioned above, you need to check whether the platform you chose is secure and safe since you are putting your own real money. A lot of cheating can be practiced on some cheap casino sites so you need to rely on the site that has good review and highest ratings. 

3. Sign up Bonus

Some mobile casino sites offer a good sign up pints. You should choose the site that is offering various signup bonuses such as cashback offers, some free spins, and some other bonus packages. On mymobicasino, you shall find the top best mobile casino sites with their current sign up bonus offers.

4. Games

This factor is one of the most important to be considered before you get your hands on online casino gambling. Since you are there to gamble, you need to check the various games offered by the site you have chosen. You know your preference so select the one that has all your kind of games. The best casino sites offer a wide variety of games such as slots, table games, sports betting and more.

5.  Customer Service

An excellent casino site must have excellent customer service. In case, when you face any technical error or you need guidance on regarding gambling, then they should be more than happy to assist you. They should be quickly responsive to your complaints.

6. Compatibility 

Last but not the least; you need to check if your device is compatible with the games and software offered by the mobile casino sites. You need to check whether you can download games.

These are some of the basic things you need to consider before playing mobile casino games.

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Dance

Dance In Times Square Today

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Ailey comes to Times Square for a series of free outdoor dance classes led by Ailey Extension instructors and NYC dance artists. Classes are open to people of all ages and all levels of dance experience!. These dance workshops are presented by Ailey Extension and one will happen today June 2 at 5pm, Broadway & 46th St. The class is Broadway Jazz with Judine Somerville to register click here.

On Wednesday, June 7 at 6pm, at Broadway & 46th St LiveDance /Time: Study III with Bill T. Jones/Arnie Zane Company co-presented with New York Live Arts

Culminating its 40th Anniversary celebration, the world renowned Bill T. Jones/Arnie Zane Company makes its Times Square debut with /Time: Study III. This piéce d’occasion, featuring the outstanding performers of the company and guest musicians, marks the third annual New York Live Arts presentation in Times Square.

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Events

Midnight Moment: The Doors: Lizard Kings

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From June 1–30, 2023 | Nightly 11:57pm – 12am metallic crystal-ridged lizards prowl and skitter across the screens of Times Square in The Doors: Lizard Kings by Zach Blas. Featuring five fantastical computer-generated creatures choreographed across 63 distinct channels, June’s Midnight Moment stems from Blas’s 2019 immersive media installation The Doors, a work exploring psychedelia, drug use, artificial intelligence, and Silicon Valley’s connections to California counterculture from the 1960s.

Slimy, glowing, and covered with mineral elements modeled after nickeline and tungsten, each of the five rendered reptiles takes on distinct personalities derived from AI neural networks trained on a constellation of sources, including Aldous Huxley’s 1954 novel The Doors of Perception and the 1960s California psychedelic rock band The Doors. Blas modeled the creatures after the prehistoric Barbaturex morrisoni, a now extinct lizard named after The Doors frontman Jim Morrison, a play on Morrison’s epithet “The Lizard King” and a prominent symbol of psychedelic liberation in the 1960s. As the lizards move through black mirrored passageways, Blas sees them as traveling in time between the psychedelic culture of the past and the present.

The Doors: Lizard Kings also nods to the contemporary psychedelic trends of microdosing LSD and psilocybin mushrooms, as well as taking nootropics. Blas suggests that this new drug culture, popularized in the tech industry, re-engineers psychedelic experience to optimize labor, promising to “unlock” doors of the mind for workers  to labor faster and more efficiently. The Doors: Lizard Kings proposes a new generation of Barbaturex morrisoni, computational symbols for a 21st century psychedelia predicated on worker productivity, smart drugs, and AI hallucinations.

Film Credits
Zach Blas, The Doors: Lizard Kings 2019 / 2023
Originally commissioned by Edith-Russ-Haus für Medienkunst, Oldenburg, Germany; de Young Museum, San Francisco, US; and Van Abbemuseum, Eindhoven, Netherlands

  • Computer Graphics Supervisor: Harry Sanderson
  • Animation: Mikkel Aabenhuus Sørensen
  • Animation Assistant: Yan Eltovsky
  • Modeling and Visual Effects: Dayne Kolk
  • Simulation Assistant: Aslak Kjølås-Sæverud
  • Compositing: Felix Lee
  • Video Editor: Martin Gajc
  • Project Manager: Talia Golland
  • Project Assistant: Audrey Amman

Sound Credits
The original presentation of The Doors featured an aural accompaniment that oscillates between abstract soundscapes and poetry spoken in AI generated voice resembling Jim Morrison’s.

  • Machine Learning Engineers (video and poetry):  Ashwin D’Cruz and Christopher Tegho
  • Machine Learning Engineers (voice and music): Sam Parke-Wolfe and Cameron Thomas
  • Musicians: xin and Aya Sinclair
  • Supervising Sound Editor: Tom Sedgwick
  • Mix Engineer: Ben Hurd

Zach Blas (b. Point Pleasant, West Virginia) is an artist, filmmaker, and writer whose practice spans moving image, computation, theory, performance, and science fiction. Blas engages the materiality of computational technologies while also drawing out the philosophies and imaginaries lurking in artificial intelligence, biometric recognition, predictive policing, airport security, the Internet. Blas has exhibited, lectured, and held screenings at venues internationally, including the 12th Berlin Biennale, Walker Art Center, Tate Modern, British Art Show 9, 12th Gwangju Biennale, de Young Museum, the 68th Berlin International Film Festival, Los Angeles County Museum of Art, ICA London, Van Abbemuseum, e-flux, ZKM Center for Art and Media, and Australian Centre for Contemporary Art. His practice has been supported by a Creative Capital award in Emerging Fields, the Arts Council England, Edith-Russ-Haus für Medienkunst, and the UK Arts and Humanities Research Council. His work is in the collections of Museo Universitario Arte Contemporáneo, National Museum of Modern and Contemporary Art, Seoul, and Whitney Museum of American Art. Blas’s practice has been written about and featured in Artforum, Frieze, ArtReview, BBC, The Guardian, and The New York Times. His 2021 artist monograph Unknown Ideals is published by Sternberg Press. Blas is an Assistant Professor of Visual Studies in the Daniels Faculty of Architecture, Landscape, and Design at the University of Toronto.

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Out of Town

A Dancing Dolly 

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Hello, Dolly! is a 1964 musical with lyrics and music by Jerry Herman and a book by Michael Stewart, based on Thornton Wilder’s 1938 farce The Merchant of Yonkers, which Wilder revised and retitled The Matchmaker in 1955. The musical follows the story of Dolly Gallagher Levi, a strong-willed matchmaker, as she travels to Yonkers, New York, to find a match for the miserly “well-known unmarried half-a-millionaire” Horace Vandergelder. The show, directed and choreographed by Gower Champion and produced by David Merrick, moved to Broadway in 1964, winning 10 Tony Awards, including Best Musical. These awards set a record which the play held for 37 years. The show album Hello, Dolly! An Original Cast Recording was inducted into the Grammy Hall of Fame in 2002. There is no denying that Jerry Herman never wrote a bad song and that you will go home singing at least one if not several of these wonderfully tuneful songs.

In this neck of the woods, Stephen Casey is well-known for his high- stepping choreography and in the Act II production of Hello, Dolly!, he does not disappoint. Everyone in this show dances. The dance numbers are many and lengthy. And The Waiters Gallop number at the Harmonia Gardens Restaurant is especially applause worthy.  The pared down chorus is just as proficient at singing as they are at dancing. And the small stage at Act II is ingeniously used to give an appearance of a much bigger space. Jenny Eisehower is a very lively and likeable Dolly Levi, in contrast to Scott Langdon’s delightfully cantankerous Mr. Vandergelder. Ms. Eisenhower’s statuesque height plays well off the shorter Mr. Langdon.We know she is a woman who is always in control. Elyse Langley displays a mature soprano rendering of “Ribbons Down my Back” as Irene Malloy. Lee Slobotkin is quite endearing as Barnaby Tucker and Jeremy Konopka is a young Tommy Tune with his longer than you can believe it legs.

The costumes by Millie Hiibel were bright and playful and worked in tandem with the simple set design by Dirk Durossette. The score is fully orchestrated though, unfortunately it’s in the “can” which for me takes away from the excitement you get from a live musical.

Unfortunately, I did not enjoy the show as much as I would have had the minor characters not been instructed or simply encouraged to mug to the audience. Every time this happened it brought me right out of the show. In 1812’s producton of The Play That Goes Wrong many of the actors were mugging their pants off and playing it over the top — but they were forgiven because they were supposed to be a terrible community theatre company.

And yet, if you like Jerry Herman and a lot of dancing you will enjoy this show and understand why it’s been revived so many times.

Tickets are available online at act2.org, by calling the Act II Box Office at 215-654-0200, or in-person at the Box Office at 56 E. Butler Ave., Ambler, PA. The Box Office is open Mon-Sat, 2 p.m. – 6 p.m. Student tickets are $15 and group discounts are available.

Hello, Dolly! Directed and Choreographed by Stephen Casey. Running now through June 18, 2023 at Act II Playhouse                                                                     56 E. Butler Ave., Ambler, PA 19002

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Broadway

League of Professional Theatre Women’s 10th Annual Women Stage The World March

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 The League of Professional Theatre Women (LPTW) will hold its 10th Annual “Women Stage the World March”  — a Suffragette-inspired project to educate the public about the role of women in the theatre industry — on Saturday, June 17.   The march will begin at noon, at Shubert Alley and weave through Times Square and the Broadway Theatre District, wrapping up at about 2 p.m.

“The event is FREE and LPTW invites all theatre women and allies to join us as we increase awareness, lift our voices, and advocate for more opportunities for women in theatre,” said Ludovica Villar-Hauser, Co-President of LPTW.

“The Women Stage the World March is designed to educate the public about the role women play in creating theatre and the barriers they face as men continue to outnumber women by 4 to 1 in key roles such as playwright, director and designers.  Women buy 67% of the tickets and represent 65% of the audience, yet 80% of the storytelling on stage is shaped by men’s voices,” said Katrin Hilbe, Co-President of LPTW.

Handouts during the March will prompt ticket-buyers to ask three questions as they make buying decisions: (1) Who wrote, directed and designed this play? (2) What is this theatre’s track record in giving opportunities to women? (3) How can you spread the word and promote women’s voices?

“All participants are encouraged to dress as their favorite historical theatre woman, or dress all in white.  March participants will gather at Shubert Alley starting at 11:30 AM, in preparation for the start of the march at noon.   Women Stage the World sashes and signs will be provided, as supplies last,” noted Penelope Deen, LPTW member and organizer of the event. Those interested in participating in the event please R.S.V.P. at: https://www.theatrewomen.org/women-stage-the-world or contact Penelope Deen at:  Womenstagetheworld@Theatrewomen.org

LPTW Co-President Ludovica Villar-Hauser added:  “The League of Professional Theatre Women stands alongside the Writers Guild of America (WGA) as they demand fair wages and take action to ensure more protections for artists. We encourage LPTW members to find a time to join the WGA on the picket lines this month as the strike continues.  Women writers are the future of the film and television industry, just as they lead the way in theatre.  LPTW supports the women on the frontlines of this movement as they call for long overdue change. We are stronger together.”

For the past 10 years LPTW members, affiliated union members, theatre artists and their allies have hit the streets in a March reminiscent of the Suffragette parades of the early 20th Century, with some marchers dressed in traditional suffrage garb and colors. ​ Like the Suffragettes before them, participants in the Women Stage the World March empower women and men to become aware, take action and influence others.

The League of Professional Theatre Women (LPTW) is a membership organization championing women in theatre and advocating for increased equity and access for all theatre women. Our programs and initiatives create community, cultivate leadership, and increase opportunities and recognition for women working in theatre. The organization provides support, networking and collaboration mechanisms for members, and offers professional development and educational opportunities for all theatre women and the general public.  LPTW celebrates the historic contributions and contemporary achievements of women in theatre, both nationally and around the globe, and advocates for parity in employment, compensation and recognition for women theatre practitioners through industry-wide initiatives and public policy proposals.   LPTW is celebrating its 40th Anniversary in 2023.

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Celebrity

The Mayor of Motivation interviews Ramon Hervey, Manager & Publicist to the Famous

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Ramon Hervey has earned global recognition as a highly regarded entertainment manager, brand consultant & publicist who has represented Richard Pryor, Bette Midler, Paul McCartney, the Bee Gees, Muhammad Ali, Caitlyn Jenner, Quincy Jones, Vanessa Williams, The Commodores with Lionel Richie, the Jacksons with Michael Jackson and a whole lot more A Listers. He is the author of the book…The Fame Game: An Insider’s Playbook for Earning Your 15 minutes.

After having invested 4 decades in playing the fame game, Ramon and I sat down to talk on The Motivation Show podcast.

Ramon, why do you call fame a “game” and why did you choose that word for your book title?    “Fame is unpredictable, just as are the results in a game.   Everyone has failures.  You hope to win, but it is not guaranteed. Only .0065% of over 7 billion people in the world are famous.  There are a lot of successful people in the world that never become famous.  Fame and success don’t come with a warranty.”

What does Ramon feel about luck playing a role in success and fame?  “I think there is a certain amount of luck in what I do.  A lot of it is timing.  Timing is a form of luck.”  One example Ramon gives is when Starbucks started to introduce music in it’s cafes.  The first one was Ray Charles, who died shortly thereafter, which skyrocketed sales of his music.   That sales surge is what Ramon attributed to luck.

The pursuit of fame…is it mostly a positive goal?   “Most people don’t know what fame is til they already become famous.  A lot of stars change their mind about what they thought fame was going to be.  A lot of people don’t like all the baggage that comes with being famous. The lack of privacy.  In my time on the planet, it has definitely changed dramatically over the past ten years.”   Ramon points to Social Media and it’s impact on more people having an opportunity to become famous in different ways than were available previously.

Why did Richard Pryor, at the height of his fame, attempt suicide & what was the famous incident which almost killed him that he later confessed to as a suicide attempt? “I managed all of Richard’s missteps.  He was probably the #1 black entertainer in the world at that time.  It’s not my fame. It’s their fame. I think Richard always felt guilty about his fame.  He didn’t think he could live up to the level of fame that he achieved. That created an albatross around his neck.  It made him rely on more substances to sedate him and calm himself.  He reached the point that he did not want to become that person anymore.  For the longest time he said that he didn’t (try to commit suicide), he said it was an accident. Richard always found a way to market his vulnerability.  All of his comedy focused on all of his missteps.  He had shot all four tires on his Mercedes and told his wife during a fight that you are not going to leave in that car.  He put that into his comedy.  He did it the exact opposite way of what we would advise which would be to put the incidences behind you. I don’t know anyone else that was as successful as him in marketing all of the things he did wrong.”

When asking Ramon about what type of confident personality one has to have to become famous he says, “I do believe you have to have a big ego and a certain amount of self confidence to be successful.  Every famous person I met took a different path to get it and they all loss some level of fame at some point.”

Can you give us an example of someone you managed very well?   “I am very proud of my relationship with Bette Midler.  She helped to blossom my career.    I was never her manager, but I was her publicist.  I did work in a management capacity…she didn’t have a manager.  I have a great appreciation and fondness for her.  Also, working with my ex-wife Vanessa Williams on her crisis management.  I did not know her at the time she was embroiled in the Miss America controversy.  She resigned here title and I am glad she did.  We got married and had three kids together and I managed her career.   It took ten years for her to get her life back after she resigned from the Miss America pageant where she was just called Vanessa Williams without alluding to any prior controversy.”

In discussing his earlier years, Ramon shares two musical giants that helped shape his career.  “In my book, I try to enlighten people about the trajectory of my own fame.  My first client I got to work with was Paul McCartney.  My initial task was to put together a press kit. That shaped my next 4 or 5 years when I got an opportunity to work with Quincy Jones who is the first client I brought to Rogers & Cowan who I was working with at the time.  He was someone I treasured to be in his presence because he had so many great stories and so much great insight.”

Ramon muses in his book about fame, that the more you get, the harder it is to manage.  I asked him if there are any other examples like that. “Probably the worst case scenario was Rick James.  He had a very troubled childhood.  For him, fame meant he put himself above people.  He created a lot of bad blood.  The way that he treated people. A lot of people did not want him to win.   He always had a great fan base, but I think his fame was toxic for him.  He self-destructed.    He was obsessed with fame and all the hoopla and perks.  He loved being the king of everything.  He was very demanding.  He did not know how to manage his fame.”

In closing, I ask Ramon, what he is most proud of.  “I am proud of my reputation.  I have never been sued. I’ve always approached business with a great deal of integrity.  I’ve always worked really hard.  I’ve always tried to be honest with my clients.  Authentic and transparent. I think that is much better than being a yes man.”

So when I think of fame, I think of getting the best table in the best restaurants.  I think about people idolizing me.  I also think about people interrupting my conversation and my meal for photos and autographs.   Do I really want that…or do I just want a nice, quiet, peaceful meal.  Hmmm…some food for thought.  How about you?  Do you want to be part of the Fame Game?

You can listen to Eli’s podcast The Motivation Show on any podcast listening app or use this Spotify link: https://open.spotify.com/show/3NVmTDAvGbzooN8TCW7tuN.    To contact Eli or to have him speak at your event, email motivatea2z@gmail.com.

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