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Time Reveals 2022 TIME100 The 100 Most Influential People in The World

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TIME reveals the 2022 TIME100, its annual list of the 100 most influential people in the world. The issue has 5 worldwide covers, each highlighting a member of the TIME100: actor Zendaya, Apple CEO Tim Cook, recording artist Mary J. Blige, Prime Minister Mia Mottley, and actor Simu Liu.

The TIME100 includes surprising pairings of the list members and the guest contributors TIME selects to write about them. The nineteenth annual list features: Michelle Obama on Oprah Winfrey, Joe Biden on Volodymyr Zelensky, Matthew McConaughey on Channing Tatum, Denis Villeneuve on Zendaya, James Corden on Adele, Reese Witherspoonon Zoë Kravitz, Martin Scorsese on Andrew Garfield, Sandra Oh on Simu Liu, Ryan Seacrest on Kris Jenner, Laurene Powell Jobs on Tim Cook, Jeb Bush on Ron DeSantis, Tom Brady on Rafael Nadal and many more.

See the 2022 TIME100 full list, tributes, videos and photos here.

Of the 2022 TIME100 list, TIME editor in chief and CEO Edward Felsenthal writes, “Our hope is that the TIME100 list is not simply a recognition of influence but a study in how influence can be wielded… If crisis is going to unite us, we must find within ourselves that same empathy. The spectrum of leaders on this list, wielding influence in so many ways, is a reminder that we all have the option to use our power for good.” https://time.com/6179626/how-we-chose-time100-2022/

Highlights include:

The 2022 TIME100 features dozens of entertainers, including Channing Tatum, Pete Davidson, Amanda Seyfried, Zendaya, Adele, Simu Liu, Mila Kunis, Oprah Winfrey, Ahmir “Questlove”Thompson, Mary J. Blige, Miranda Lambert, Jon Batiste, Keanu Reeves and more.

Athletes on this year’s list include: Nathan Chen, Alex Morgan, Eileen Gu, Candace Parker, Alex Morgan, Megan Rapinoe and Becky Sauerbrunn and Rafael Nadal.

This year’s list features 49 women, including Mary J.Blige, Oprah Winfrey, Michelle Yeoh, Ariana DeBose, Adele, Miranda Lambert, Sarah Jessica Parker, Amanda Seyfried, Zendaya, Nadine Smith, Ketanji Brown Jackson, Quinta Brunson, Zoe Kravitz, Cristina Villarreal Velásquez and others.

The list features U.S. President Joe Biden, and other U.S. political figures including Kevin McCarthy, Ron DeSantis, Kyrsten Sinema, Ketanji Brown Jackson and more.

Other notable writers include Sacha Baron Cohen, Mindy Kaling, LeBron James, Billy Porter, Stevie Wonder, Alexei Navalny, Jimmy Fallon, Bernie Sanders, Bowen Yang, Billie Jean King, Chip and Joanna Gaines, Jack Harlow, Cory Booker, and more.

Xi Jinping is on the list for the 13th time, more than any other person on the list this year. Other repeats include: Oprah Winfrey (10), Vladimir Putin (7), Joe Biden (5), Christine Lagarde (5),Tim Cook (5), Adele (3), Rafael Nadal (2), Alex Morgan (2), Abiy Ahmed (2), Issa Rae (2), Megan Rapinoe (2) and Ursula von der Leyen (2).

Eileen Gu, 18-years-old, is the youngest person on this year’s list. The oldest person on this year’s list is Faith Ringgold, ​​who is 91-years-old.

Nas on Mary J. Blige: “Mary came up the way we all did. She was a voice for us, but she wasn’t like other R&B artists at the time. She became a household name early because she was a hip-hop artist who also sang. The industry needed someone like that. The streets wanted that. Pop culture wanted that…… And when Mary came onstage at the Super Bowl halftime show this year, she got one of the loudest responses…She carved out a lane for herself, and now she can feed the people more than just music…. She became who she’s supposed to be.”

Laurene Powell Jobs on Tim Cook: “Apple is Tim Cook’s life’s work, and in this work, Tim displays mastery. Tim has demonstrated more range in his leadership of one of the world’s largest companies than any contemporary CEO. …Tim’s job demands not only business wisdom but also philosophical wisdom. The intense pressure of setting and executing Apple’s progression with deep precision, and of taking responsibility for the company’s effects on society, is almost unimaginable. Yet Tim does it with compassion and discipline, turning to nature to replenish his spirit.”

Denis Villeneuve on Zendaya: “She is an autonomous creative force herself. A cultural icon in the making. A person driven by pure inspiration, empathy, and respect for her craft, who uses authenticity as a new superpower. She seems fearless, her roots run deep, and I love that she still laughs like a kid. Zendaya is the future. And there is nothing more comforting to me. This is only the beginning.”

Sandra Oh on Simu Liu: “Simu has been working hard to get through closed doors, and now he wants to hold those doors open for others. You see him doing that through the way he speaks out against hateful violence, his openness about his own experiences of isolation and discrimination, his professional choices. He’s our superhero.”

Ngozi Okonjo-Iweala on Mia Mottley: “There are some who stand tall and stand out no matter where they are from—whether a large, densely populated country or a small island nation. Prime Minister Mia Mottley of Barbados is one such person. Bold, fearless, and possessing a great intellect and wit, the Prime Minister is a brilliant politician who knows how to shake things up… She is an embodiment of our conscience, reminding us all to treat our planet, and therefore one another, with love, dignity, and care.”

Joe Biden on Volodymyr Zelensky: “In President Zelensky, the people of Ukraine have a leader worthy of their bravery and resilience, as citizens across the country… fight for their homes and their freedom… The nations of the free world, inspired by the example of President Zelensky, are more united, more determined, and more purposeful than at any point in recent memory. With the support of the U.S. and our allies and partners, he has left his mark on history and proved to the world that Ukraine will long endure and its people will ultimately realize the democratic future they have long desired.”

Bill Clinton on Joe Biden: “On the global stage, President Biden has unified our democratic allies across Europe and around the world to isolate Russia and provide military and humanitarian assistance to the brave people of Ukraine, while restoring U.S. leadership on key issues including climate change, democracy, and human rights. We still face stern tasks, including taming inflation without causing a recession, and combatting violent crime. The usual sound bites and answers that dominate the news won’t help. But a get-the-job-done leader who cares more about the people than the polls, more about winning the future than rewriting history, will. That’s who Joe Biden is. And why I’m glad he’s on the job.”

Matthew McConaughey on Channing Tatum: “Unafraid to fear, confident enough to be the brunt of the joke, and playful enough to take the dare, Channing calls the youth in all of us out to play.Innocent sometimes, naive never, he’s a nine-lives sleight-of-hand magic trick by design and on purpose.He doesn’t handle his business in the game of Hollywood, he plays his game in the business of Hollywood.”

Cynthia Nixon on Sarah Jessica Parker: “She isn’t tall, but she is a giant—as a performer, producer, and businesswoman. And she is, quite simply, beloved. We love her glamour, her vulnerability, her fearless oh-so-skilled physical comedy, her sexiness, and her sweetness. But most of all, we love the essence of who she is… Because while superficial things about my friend have changed, when I look at Sarah Jessica, I see that same one-of-a-kind, diamond-in-the-rough 12-year-old. And I always will.”

Kara Swisher on Joe Rogan: “I’m probably the very last person you might pick to assess the power and meaning of Joe Rogan. While we both do long podcasts, we’re quite different in terms of origins (journalist vs. comic), tone (persistently tough vs. indefatigably curious), and content (just the facts vs. just asking questions—including to obvious charlatans)… Rogan has pioneered and plowed the fields like no other. To say he is big is an understatement… But he’s also gotten into a lot of trouble this year for resurfaced racial slurs he made—and apologized for—and being a place where COVID deniers get a very easy ride. It’s complicated, of course, but there’s no question that Rogan’s success is pretty simple: the former Fear Factor host has become the nation’s earworm.”

Ryan Seacrest on Kris Jenner: “When I was first introduced to Kris Jenner, she possessed everything you would envy in a person: charisma, confidence, and warmth… .I saw her fearlessness firsthand as she insisted the show include not only the family’s high points, but all its vulnerabilities as well. Since then, Kris has become the undisputed matriarch of reality television and is destined to be ranked among the top marketing minds in history… As the stabilizing core of an empire, she continually navigates the unexpected challenges of life and business with empathy, transparency, and endurance.”

Michelle Obama on Oprah Winfrey: Whether she’s talking to pop stars, Presidents, schoolgirls, scholars—or she’s asking you about your life over a glass of wine in the living room—Oprah has always had that uncanny ability to open us up, to hear beyond our words, and to uncover a higher truth, to be vulnerable with us in a way that allows us to be vulnerable back…. When Oprah connects with something—a person, a book, a song, an idea—she makes sure to shine her light on it. She validates it. She anoints it… That’s why no matter where you 
go, everyone knows her name. And all of it makes me wonder: maybe her success isn’t rooted in the fact that she found a common denominator that unites us all. Maybe Oprah 
is our common denominator.”

Elle King on Miranda Lambert: “Not a lot of people will take your hand, nudge you right into the spotlight, and share it with you…But that’s exactly what Miranda Lambert did in 2019, when she asked me to be a part of her Roadside Bars & Pink Guitars Tour, during which she brought along a new generation of artists to share her stage. It was Miranda’s idea to bring us all together—she wanted powerful female voices to front the whole thing. That’s her vibe: she’s all about making everybody feel welcome. And there is not one inauthentic hair on her head.”

Reese Witherspoon on Zoë Kravitz: “Zoë Kravitz defies definition. She contains multitudes and stands fully formed in her beauty, her intelligence, her grace, her humor, her strength. Part maverick, part savant, mostly just … cool…Working with Zoë on Big Little Lies, I discovered her hidden talent: her humor. She made me laugh during endless night shoots and always pushed the comedic tension between our characters onscreen.”

Jack Harlow on Pete Davidson: “Pete’s appeal to the world has everything to do with his authenticity. He doesn’t try to hide the person that he is. It’s a classic recipe for success and connection. I would consider myself truthful, but being around Pete makes me want to continue to reach even further for the realest version of myself. We don’t have another one of him. He’s daring, thoughtful, and simply hilarious. And he’s only 28. An icon with so much more left to accomplish.”

LeBron James on Quinta Brunson: “That’s the real beauty of Quinta’s brilliance. Using humor and nuance to connect people over everyday realities in order to improve them—for students, teachers, creators, and everyone who comes after her. Because it’s all about opening doors. Breaking down barriers. And doing it with love, kindness, and compassion. While still being an absolute boss like QB.”

Steve Ballmer on Andy Jassy: “Moving computing into the cloud is one of the great functional transformations of technology in my lifetime. Andy Jassy, who led Amazon Web Services (AWS) since its inception in 2003, was a great leader in that transformation. With AWS, he built one of the world’s most successful businesses…Hats off to him for what he’s done at Amazon over the last two decades and what he will accomplish going forward—even if I’m rooting for Microsoft when the two companies compete.”

The Complete list:

Gautam Adani, chairperson of Adani Group

Adele, recording artist

Abiy Ahmed, Prime Minister of Ethiopia

Anwar Al Bunni and Mazen Darwish, lawyers

Elizabeth Alexander, poet and president of the Mellon Foundation

Bela Bajaria, Netflix executive

Stéphane Bancel, CEO of Moderna

Umar Ata Bandial, Chief Justice of Pakistan

Sam Bankman-Fried, CEO of FTX

Jon Batiste, recording artist

Joe Biden, President of the United States

Mary J. Blige,  recording artist

Gabriel Boric, President of Chile

Quinta Brunson, actor, writer, and producer

Mike Cannon-Brookes, CEO of Atlassian

Nathan Chen, figure skater

Tim Cook, CEO of Apple

Pete Davidson, comedian

Ariana DeBose, actor

Demna, fashion designer  

Ron DeSantis, Governor of Florida

Hwang Dong-hyuk, film director

Evan Eichler, Karen Miga, Adam Phillippy and Michael Schatz, researchers

Lynn Fitch, Attorney General of Mississippi

Andrew Garfield, actor

Timnit Gebru, computer scientist

Nan Goldin, photographer

Eileen Gu, skier

Sônia Guajajara, activist

Samia Suluhu Hassan, President of Tanzania

Frances  Haugen, data engineer

Michael R. Jackson, playwright, composer and lyricist

Ketanji Brown Jackson, federal judge

Letitia James, Attorney General of New York

Andy Jassy, CEO of Amazon

Kris Jenner, media personality

Francis Kéré, architect

Hoda Khamosh, activist

Zoë Kravitz, actor

Mila Kunis, actor

Christine Lagarde, European Central Bank president

Miranda Lambert, recording artist

Maya Lin, architect and artist

Simu Liu, actor

Valérie Masson-Delmotte and Panmao Zhai, climate scientists

Kevin McCarthy, politician

Alex Morgan, Megan Rapinoe and Becky Sauerbrunn, soccer players

Mia Mottley, Prime Minister of Barbados

Sikhulile Moyo and Tulio de Oliveira, researchers

Dmitry Muratov, journalist

Sevgil Musaieva, journalist

Rafael Nadal, tennis player

Karuna Nundy, lawyer

Emily Oster, economist

Derrick Palmer and Chris Smalls, union organizers

Sarah Jessica Parker, actor

Candace Parker, basketball player

Khurram Parvez, activist

Peng Shuai, tennis player

Vladimir Putin, President of Russia

Issa Rae, actor, writer, and producer

Keanu Reeves, actor

Faith Ringgold, artist

Gregory L. Robinson, program director of the James Webb Space Telescope

Joe Rogan, host

Sally Rooney, author

Emmett Schelling, executive director of Transgender Education Network of Texas

Olaf Scholz, Chancellor of Germany

Amanda Seyfried, actor

Kyrsten Sinema, U.S. Senator for Arizona

Nadine Smith, executive director of Equality Florida

Jeremy Strong, actor

Jazmine Sullivan, recording artist

Sun Chunlan, Vice Premier of the People’s Republic of China

Channing Tatum, actor

Ahmir “Questlove” Thompson, filmmaker and recording artist

Cristina Villarreal Velásquez and Ana Cristina González Vélez, Causa Justa pioneers

David Vélez, CEO of Nubank

Ursula von der Leyen, President of the European Commission

Taika Waititi, filmmaker

Josh Wardle, software engineer

Oprah Winfrey, host, television producer, actor, author, and philanthropist

Xi Jinping, President of China

Michelle Yeoh, actor

Yoon Suk-yeol, President of South Korea

Valeriy Zaluzhnyy, Ukrainian General

David Zaslav, CEO of Warner Bros. Discovery

Michelle Zauner, recording artist

Volodymyr Zelensky, President of Ukraine

Zendaya, actor

The second annual TIME100 Summit on June 7, 2022 will convene leaders from the global TIME100 community to spotlight solutions and encourage action toward a better world. Speakers for the day-long event include: Apple CEO Tim Cook; co-chair, Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation Bill Gates; NBA champion, entrepreneur, and philanthropist Dwyane Wade; writer, producer, and actor Mindy Kaling; U.S. Special Presidential Envoy for Climate John Kerry; former U.S. Representative and co-founder, Giffords Gabrielle Giffords; Prime Minister of Barbados Mia Mottley; founder and creative director, Brother Vellies Aurora James, designer Christian Siriano; head of global TV, Netflix Bela Bajaria; Olympic Champion, Freestyle Skiing Eileen Gu; writer, director, producer and actor Taika Waititi; poet and author Cathy Park Hong; artist Jon Batiste; senior vice president, BioNTech SEDr. Katalin Karikó; filmmakers Betsy West and Julie Cohen and more. Visit Time100summit.com for program and speaker updates.

The 16th annual TIME100 Gala, celebrating TIME’s list of the world’s most influential people, will take place on June 8, 2022. The event will feature performances by Mary J. Bligeand Miranda Lambert, as well as honorary tributes from members of this year’s list, remarks from TIME Editor-in-Chief and CEO Edward Felsenthal, and more.

Both events will take place at the Frederick P. Rose Hall, home of Jazz at Lincoln Center in New York City.

The  June 6 / June 13 double issue of TIME goes on sale on Friday, May 27.

Suzanna, co-owns and publishes the newspaper Times Square Chronicles or T2C. At one point a working actress, she has performed in numerous productions in film, TV, cabaret, opera and theatre. She has performed at The New Orleans Jazz festival, The United Nations and Carnegie Hall. She has a screenplay and a TV show in the works, which she developed with her mentor and friend the late Arthur Herzog. She is a proud member of the Drama Desk and the Outer Critics Circle and was a nominator. Email: suzanna@t2conline.com

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In “Back to Black,” Star Marisa Abela Turns in An Uncanny Performance as Amy Winehouse in The Sam Taylor-Johnson Biopic

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Evoking classic R&B, the late Amy Winehouse emerged as a celebrated new stars by making old music sound fresh. She possessed a deeply soulful voice which she used to sing songs of love, heartbreak, and struggles with substance abuse, as in her Top-10 hit “Rehab.” Winehouse sold 16 million copies of the LP Back to Black” and won big at the 2008 Grammy Awards, taking home Song of the Year, Record of the Year, and Best New Artist. All that success was overshadowed by the Brit’s personal troubles, which, according to MTV News, included an arrest for drug possession — there was a viral video of the singer smoking what was reportedly crack cocaine — and an emphysema diagnosis.

Winehouse’s demons tragically got the best of her. According to The Guardian, authorities were summoned to the singer’s north London home in July 2011, where they found her dead at the scene. Winehouse was reportedly a heroin user, but a post mortem inquest pinpointed a different cause of death. According to “The Independent”, a London coroner found no drugs in her system, ruling that the singer died of alcohol poisoning following a period of three weeks of sobriety. Winehouse is believed to have consumed 416 milligrams of alcohol per deciliter of blood, well over a fatal level of 350 milligrams. She was 27 years old.

This complicated history has been fodder for articles, books, a notable documentary and now a feature film, “Back to Black”. The movie’s title is taken from the hot album of the same name. Directed by 57-year-old Sam Taylor-Johnson, her feature film debut was 2009’s “Nowhere Boy,” based on the Beatles’ singer/songwriter John Lennon’s childhood experiences.

Taylor-Johnson’s star for “Back to Black,” Marisa Abela, made her TV debut in 2020 with leads in the Sky One political thriller, “COBRA” and the BBC Two/ HBO office drama, “Industry.”  Abela appeared in the 2022 films, “She Is Love” and “Rogue Agent.” In July 2022, she joined the cast of Greta Gerwig’s “Barbie” (2023). Then the actress starred as Winehouse in this biopic.

This Q&A comes from an appearance made by the duo at the Museum of The Moving Image shortly before the film’s May 17th release.

T2C: This is a remarkable story and one that, in some ways, is privy to when she was alive. For each of you, what moved the dial from this is a remarkable story to this is a remarkable story that I need to tell?

Sam Taylor-Johnson:

Sam Taylor-Johnson: When Alison Owen, our producer, called me and said, “I’m looking to make the story of Amy Winehouse, which would be interesting,” I felt like I couldn’t say “Yes” quick enough. After I said so, I suddenly processed the enormity of what I was taking on. It felt like it had to be made from [Amy’s] perspective because, by living in London around the time when she was alive, I watched how her life was dissected and pulled apart in the tabloids and similarly post-death. I felt like going directly into her perspective. It was almost like allowing her to tell her own story through her words and her lyrics. It felt like a timely thing to do.

Marisa Abela

Marisa Abela: Basically, I got a call from my agent who said they’re doing it. I was about 13 when “Back to Black” came out, so I was aware of her music. I was singing the songs, but when you’re singing “Love Is A Losing Game” and you’re 13 years old, it doesn’t mean that you really understood it fully. That was my understanding of Amy [at the time]. Then, because of all of the tabloids and the images and stuff, I knew of her in that way. So, I said, “Let me think about it.” I was then in front of Sam Taylor-Johnson and Nina Gold, an amazing casting director in London. I knew they were being quite specific about who they were seeing, so I just didn’t want to make a fool of myself, essentially.

Then I started watching footage, the documentary, interviews about her life – things that really were quite telling [about] who she was as a person. There was just this thing about her and that carried me through the entire process I was watching. And there was this magnetism, this intensity, this deep well of feeling, emotions and intensity, that I was so drawn to. I felt that we’d drawn from Amy, herself. It was all there in her music. And for the people who still listened to her music often, this is for them. In the narrative around her life and death, I felt that what we’d lost really came through, but it seems like there’s a double-edged sword here.

T2C: There’s so much media and coverage, so many perspectives to sort through. Talk a bit more about your process and how you blocked out the noise and chose to privilege us with her perspective with what was there?

Sam Taylor-Johnson: It was important from the beginning to just block out the noise. There was a lot, especially when we were filming, and it became louder and louder. The louder it became, the more determined I was to just keep driving forward with it through her eyes and to uphold her. Our press are quite famous for pulling down anything that might seem to be successful in any way. It felt like those voices saying we need to protect her legacy were also the ones who pulled her apart during her lifetime. That emboldened me in a way to shut those voices out. The decision around how and what sort of film was going to be quite quickly came into place.

When I sat down with Matt Greenhalgh, who wrote the movie, I said, “If we are going through her workstyle perspective, with “Frank” and then “Back to Black,” obviously those are the keys to this film. “Back to Black” really is a love story and tells us everything within it. It became our framework. I knew that that was difficult for a lot of people who had a lot of opinions and judgments. I felt like her declaration of love and the power of that love was important to uphold in order to understand the creative journey of “Back to Black. In a way, we went into her perspective saying, she loved her father and she loved Blake: therefore, that’s our view. We still see some of the things that are highlighted in the documentary that people feel strongly about. They’re still part of our film, but they’re not seen through the lens of judgment. It was quite freeing to stay in her shoes on that journey.

T2C: This being a love story, you think immediately of romantic love. But the relationships that I was most struck by were those she had with her family. Talk a bit about choosing actors and having them light up those roles?

Sam Taylor-Johnson: With her Jewish grandmother, it was clear — during the research and hearing the stories from the family and others — that she was so much a part of the fabric of who Amy was, through Grandma Cynthia’s style and love of jazz and music. So it felt like, “Okay, this is worth going further into and strengthening that relationship.”  But when I went to Lesley [Manville] initially, she said, “Oh, I don’t know if there’s enough on the page for me.” I said, “Look at it like this is the fabric of Amy.” Once Lesley came on board, we then wrote more scenes because she was just so exceptional. We just honed in on those relationships that we felt were really important to the narrative of this story. Obviously, within — I don’t know how many minutes it was, I’ve forgotten — so much had to be dropped by the wayside. For me, as a storyteller, I have to just find my path. The Winehouses — Cynthia, Mitch, and Janis — plus husband Blake were on a path.

T2C: Talk a bit more about the music. Obviously there’s a great blueprint here. Did you have to make difficult decisions about what songs were included?

Sam Taylor-Johnson: I’ll start, but I want Marisa to take over on this because I’m talking too much. What I had quite early on was one of her playlists. On that playlist were The Specials and Minnie Riperton. It was quite a gift to have that. Amazingly, of all the things that were written that weren’t Amy’s music, we managed to have access to it. But when I started the movie, I had all the music rights from Sony and Universal. I didn’t have to have approval for anybody. I could just make the movie I wanted to make. Matt wrote very specifically for the songs, almost like it’s a musical in the sense that it belonged to the narrative structure. You couldn’t choose “Love Is a Losing Game” and switch it with “Stronger Than Me.” It really was laid out that way.

I’ll let Marisa come into this because I just want to say, when I met Marisa for the audition, she said, I remember, “What about singing? I’m not a singer.” But Marisa sang that entire movie. Every song you hear. So from the position of declaring she couldn’t sing, what you saw is very contrary to that. Okay, you can talk about that…

Marisa Abela: I think what became clear was, as I was reading the script more and more, and watching more and more footage of Amy, was that these albums are so iconic and incredible from a songwriting perspective as well as a musical one. But what was so incredible about the performances I was watching was that they were completely different every single time. If she was in a bad mood – and she was often in a really, really bad mood – you wouldn’t get half the song from her. If she was in a great mood, she was singing all over the place, amazing riffs. To certain members of the audience, this is the thing that made Amy a live performer.

What weirdly felt like the most authentic choice was to be able to use my own voice to make whatever choice came to me in the moment from a purely impulse perspective as an actor. What was inspiring me at this moment? Is it that I’m looking at Blake during “There Is No Greater Love” and I’m so overwhelmed with feeling and emotion that I want to hold on to a specific sound for longer so that he can hear me through all of those decisions? In the same way, the first time you hear her write one of her own songs with “What Is It About Men,” I wanted to be able to think about each line. How am I formulating this moment? you get to see the behind-the-scenes of the creation of a song. That’s a really beautiful thing. If we were cutting to the studio recording of “What Is It About Men,” for example, you couldn’t have that scene of Amy sitting on the bed writing it for the first time, getting mixed up with certain words.

I basically felt I needed to get as close as possible to something that sounded as recognizable as possible to one of the most recognizable voices that you would believe in. The truth is, if you listen to them side by side, I’m sure there are huge differences. But it doesn’t matter as long as you believe what she’s saying and as long as you believe what she’s feeling. That, to me, was always the most important thing as an actor, obviously. It’s the intention that matters. Process-wise, I trained very hard and also learned to play the guitar. I listened to all the people that I think she would have grown up listening to. As Sam said, we had lots of playlists of hers.

I was aware that she grew up listening to Billie Holiday, Sarah Vaughan, Diana Washington, Ella Fitzgerald, Lauryn Hill, Ray Charles. I just surrounded myself with that music and was singing along to it all the time. Then I was using the techniques I was learning with my singing teacher that were Amy’s tecjmoqies. We have a different face. She has a bigger jaw than me. She had a different nose to me. We use different resonances. So, it’s different. But the intention is the most important thing. I was training for two hours a day, every day, over the four months with my singing teacher.

T2C: There’s so much to dive into with its emotionality, but you touched upon something that I wanted me to talk to you about – creating these scenes like Glastonbury, the Grammys and things that we have enormous touchstones for beyond Amy’s experiences. These are media events that happen all the time. So practically recreating these scenes, which you do so successfully, can you talk more about them?

Sam Taylor-Johnson: Oh, I’d love to because I’m so proud of Glastonbury. When you see that big open-air festival, we shot it in a room not much bigger than this theater. We just had brilliantly creative teams working on this. Glastonbury for the rest of the year is just a field. So all of those stages and everything, we had to recreate and film it. I had an incredible sound crew. What we created, it took months to get that sound exactly right. Then the Ronnie Scott scene early on. That was the only time I ever saw Amy play, in a young, up-and-coming Voices of Jazz. How old was she? Probably 19 or 20. It was at Ronnie Scott’s. I used my memory of what it felt like being in the room with her to recreate how that would have felt. But yes, a lot of it, like the Grammys, we had YouTube running alongside what we were filming to try and emulate it as much as possible – like the same camera angles. Marisa’s performance, as you can see, was absolutely spot-on. Every finger movement was incredible. So it was fun. It was so fun to recreate this. And, it’s fun to watch it.

Film: Back to Black

Director: Sam Taylor-Johnson

Cast: Marisa Abela, Jack O’Connell, Eddie Marsan, Juliet Cowan, Lesley Manville, Sam Buchanan, Pete Lee-Wilson, Thelma Ruby, Renee Matilda Thorpe, Ryan O’Doherty

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Items From Taylor Swift, Amy Winehouse and Elvis to be Auctioned Off at Kruse GWS Auctions

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The personal Bible Elvis had on his nightstand the night he died with his favorite passages underlined, fashion worn by Taylor Swift and Amy Winehouse, and luxury items from Bibi and Eric Hilton of the famed hotel family are big draws for this May 25th megawattage event from Kruse GWS Auctions.

Before going on stage, Elvis often would read the Bible to calm his nerves and pray for a good show. The Bible, embossed with Elvis Aaron Presley in gold, comes with a handwritten letter from his cousin Patsy, who was given the book by the Elvis’ dad Vernon when they were packing up his son’s belongings at Graceland.

Five years into his illustrious career and already insanely popular, Elvis was drafted into the US Army and the auction will feature a set of the fatigues he wore, replete with his name on front and original sleeve patches. Serving from March 1958 to March 1960, the megastar was offered special treatment but declined, opting instead to be treated like a regular G.I Joe. Though a brief interruption in his music career, his military service had a huge impact on his personal life as he would meet future wife Priscilla, whose stepfather was stationed near where Elvis served in Germany.

Swifties are sure to flock to the gorgeous dresses up for auction that Taylor has been photographed wearing. One is a Sure Fire Coral Dress the pop star wore during an “Access Hollywood” interview on April 29, 2015, promoting her 1989 World Tour. Crafted by the esteemed fashion label Three Floor, the dress’s coral hue perfectly complements Taylor Swift’s radiant personality. The other is a floral peach zip dress worn backstage during her milestone Speak Now World Tour (2011-2012).

Amy Winehouse’s life was cut short but her musical legacy lives on. The auction is selling the black stretch cotton tube top and Tina Kalivas fitted peplum skirt the British singer-songwriter wore when she appeared via satellite from London on the 50th annual Grammy Awards in 2008 and the same outfit is featured in the buzzy new film “Back to Black” about Winehouse’s life. A monumental moment in her career, she won five awards, tying the then record for the most wins by a female artist in a single night.

Amy Winehouse dress

“No one on the planet is hotter than Taylor Swift, and Amy Winehouse is having her moment with the release of the biopic “Back to Black,” says Brigitte Kruse, founder of Kruse GWS Auctions. “Plus, there’s been a scarcity of new Presley items up for auction, but Baz Luhrmann’s “Elvis” film has re-energized the marketplace.”

Elvis’s Diamond Ring

When it comes to memorabilia from the King of Rock ‘n’ Roll, Kruse reigns, having previously sold hisengine-less private jet for half a million. Among the handful of women at the top of the global multi-billion dollar auction industry, she has sold an astounding $4.2 billion in assets and was the first woman auctioneer to set a Guinness World Record.

Taylor Swift backstage dress

While stationed in Germany, Elvis–looking to get away from media attention—took a two-week “secret” vacation in 1959, staying at a lakeside resort area. At a local beer garden, he signed a chair, which is available for bidding and comes with documentation and holiday photos.

Taylor Swift backstage dress

For fans of the rock star’s more flamboyant sartorial looks, there’s a custom mink and leather coat that he loved and wore and a pair of his cult classic Neostyle Nautic sunglasses with a 14k gold TCB logo worn during the filming of “Elvis on Tour.”

What would an Elvis-oriented auction be without a little bling? The sale includes a 6.00ct black star sapphire, diamond and 14K gold ring, a rather substantial diamond ring highlighted by its intricate beveled design and ornate texture, and his well-known 14K yellow gold ring, with a 1929 Indian Head $2.50 gold coin.

Perhaps more unusual though, is an Elvis-designed watch, (one of perhaps two dozen) given to his closest friends. It features a Star of David intertwined with a Christian cross and photos show him wearing one of these customized time pieces. And a treat for rat-pack fans: two pieces Elvis gifted to entertainer, friend and Vegas regular Sammy Davis Jr.,–a gold claw pendant with EP initials and a gold lion at the tip, and a 14K Yellow Gold TCB Necklace, the logo he created with former wife Priscilla. And, music fans will want to take advantage of the opportunity to get one of his personal guitars, a Guild D-40 sunburst acoustic model and accompanying hard case.

Hilton Emerald Ring

Bibi and Eric Hilton—yes, they’re Paris’s great aunt and uncle—were indeed hotel royalty. Eric was the former Vice Chairman of the Hilton Hotels Corporation and as a longtime resident of Las Vegas active in a variety of local philanthropic endeavors. His wife Bibi traveled the world as a goodwill ambassadress for the hotel chain, rubbing shoulders with the who’s who of entertainment, fashion, business, and government, working alongside her husband to ensure the Hilton brand rose to the internationally iconic status it enjoys today.

Hilton Engagement Ring

Eric booked Elvis for the Vegas Hilton and he still holds the record for the longest running residency. The auction pays homage to Sin City’s main industry with Hilton’s set of limited edition solid 18K gold poker chips emblematic of the city’s illustrious gaming history. The 5 chips—in $25,000, $5,000, $1000, $500, and $100 denominations—were minted solely for the Hilton Entertainment Family Caesar’s Palace Board of Directors.

The estate’s jewelry offerings–from fun faux to fine and fab–include several truly outstanding pieces. Romantics will appreciate the lovely engagement ring that Eric Hilton gave to his soon-to-be wife Bibi. This 18K gold ring was custom made and designed by the couple, and features a brilliant use of fiery white diamonds, embellished with vivid red rubies. Another gorgeous ring crafted in 14k gold boasts a stunning 11.20ct pear cut emerald surrounded by 1.30ctw brilliant round cut fiery white diamonds.

Additionally, the sale contains several exquisite emeralds. One is a pendant crafted in 14k yellow gold and boasts a spectacular 25.72ct emerald cut emerald that exhibits a vibrant lush green color that only the finest display and is surrounded by 2.75ctw brilliant round cut diamonds. There’s also a 14k gold ring distinguished by an impressive 11.20ct pear cut emerald center.

Live bidding begins on May 25th at 7am PT at bid.gwsauctions.com. All Presley pieces come with detailed letter of provenance and the Hilton items with a letter of appreciation signed by the estate executor. Pre-bidding is also available on the website now.

Click here for link to entire catalogue of auction items with descriptions

Kruse GWS Inc. is the world-record breaking auction house specializing in Entertainment Memorabilia, Fine Jewelry, Master Timepieces, Royal Artifacts, Real Estate, Luxury Automobiles, Whiskey/Spirits, NFTs and NFT appraisals. Founder Dame Brigitte Kruse is the first auctioneer to be knighted by a Royal Family, the first female auctioneer to set a Guinness World Record and is a member of the Forbes Los Angeles Business Council. The auction house continues to be featured in world-wide press. Brigitte Kruse built the world’s first NFT marketplace with a live auction feature. The globally respected auction house has been featured around the world for sales of such notable items as Elvis Presley’s personal jet, Marilyn Monroe’s famous black dress, Marlon Brando’s historic Rolex watch, Italian Renaissance philosopher Machiavelli’s estate in Florence, Italy, and the 14th century celadon bowl owned by the last Empress of Vietnam. For more information please visit bid.gwsauctions.com.

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The Glorious Corner

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G.H. Harding

TRUMPED AT CANNES — What with Francis Ford Coppola’s Megalopolis and Kevin Costner’s Horizon garnering most of the pre-Cannes ink, it turns out that The Apprentice; the so-called rise of Donald Trump, has become to must-see attraction there.

Starring Sebastian Stan

Sebastian Stan

and Jeremy Strong -as Roy Cohn-  its received the most attention after its screening this week. Check out this up-to-date spot from The Hollywood Reporter:


The Trump camp has threatened a lawsuit over a somewhat graphic scene between Trump and Ivana in the movie. The filmmaker Ali Abbasi has said that while the lawsuits may fly fast and furious from the Trump-camp, their success rate should be re-examined. A pretty savvy response if you ask me.

MORE TREK — (Via Deadline) Oscar winner  Holly Hunter has been tapped to star in Paramount+’s upcoming series Star Trek: Starfleet Academy. Hunter will play the captain and chancellor of Starfleet Academy in the series which will begin production later this summer.

Produced by CBS Studios, the series will follow the adventures of a new class of Starfleet cadets as they come of age in one of the most legendary places in the galaxy.

Per the logline: Star Trek: Starfleet Academy introduces viewers to a young group of cadets who come together to pursue a common dream of hope and optimism. Under the watchful and demanding eyes of their instructors, they discover what it takes to become Starfleet officers as they navigate blossoming friendships, explosive rivalries, first loves and a new enemy that threatens both the Academy and the Federation itself.

As a Treker-from the 60’s, where the hell is the next proper Star Trek-movie with Chris Pine and Zachary Quinto? They both were fantastic in my mind. Into Darkness was sensational? Weird for sure.

Michael Jackson and Ron Alexenburg

SHORT TAKES — Record-industry icon Ron Alexenburg is penning his autobiography to be called From The Warehouse To The Penthouse. Alexenburg, when he ran Epic Records, worked with everyone from Michael Jackson to Meat Loaf, Boston, The Beach Boys, and Charlie Daniels. Here’s a great interview with him:

Oddly, he doesn’t mention his Infinity Records opus, where I worked with him. The opening night party for the label was at the NY Public Library in NYC. It was an awesome event …

Speaking of books, Dave Mason’s Only You Know and I Know is finally out after a massive delay. I saw a video of him opening the first box. Apparently it is only available through his website. Good luck Dave …

We haven’t seen Kevin Costner’s Horizon yet, but a report from Roger Friedman (Showbiz 411), claims Costner doesn’t even appear in the movie for the first hour. Really? …

Christopher Reeve

Great Hamptons Film Festival exclusive by Roger Friedman. Check it out: https://www.showbiz411.com/2024/05/21/hot-ticket-christopher-reeve-super-man-film-to-get-early-look-hamptons-screening-before-release-at-summerdocs … And, great spot on Jimmy Fallon’s Tonight Show on the new book from Michael McDonald with Paul Reiser (What A Fool Believes/DEY Street):

RIP Fred Roos.

NAMES IN THE NEWS — Riley Keough; Edwyn Collins; Tom & Lisa Cuddy; Tony Seidel; Jason Cooper; Bob Krasnow; Les Schwartz; Pete Sanders; Jeremy Long; Peter Shendell; Randy Alexander; Carson Daly; Pete Best; Cory Robbins; Bill Adler; Roy Trakin; Mark Bego; Nancy Ruth; Teresa Knox; Kent and Laura Denmark; and BELLA!

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RASCALS AT SONY HALL — The Rascals long-awaited return to NYC proved to be a sensational evening of music. Their 16-song set, backed up by a terrific band -including bassist John Billings from Micky Dolenz’s band- was rocking from the start with their “Do You Feel It” and “”Beautiful Morning.” Felix Cavaliere’s vibrant vocals were just a joy. Face it, for people of a certain age, we grew up with this voice … just magical.

Micky Dolenz

Their cover of the Jackie Wilson-chestnut “(Your Love Keeps Lifting Me) High” set the SRO crowd afire.

Felix then brought his daughter Aria out for two selections. Clearly, she’s inherited by father’s dynamic vocal prowess. She was just terrific and a nice surprise.

Cavaliere then brought out guitarist Gene Cornish who was just wonderful. Gene has had some health issues, but his presence brought the show to a magnificent high-point.

Oddly, there was no mention of the rumored “My Hawaii” from Cavaliere with vocals from Dolly Parton. He mentioned it in a recent interview with Medium, but was mum about it on last Monday’s WOR-interview with Len Berman and Michael Riedel. I hear that the release has been held up several times. Sad … can’t wait to hear it.

The show ended with their signature classics “I’ve Been Lonely Too Long,” “How Can I Be Sure,” “People Got To Be Free” and Good Lovin’.” The Rascals’ music is ingrained and it was a joy to hear it once again. Truth be told, it sounded better than ever!

Seated in a corner booth by the stage was none other than Bill Murray – a huge fan. Great night sensational set. Also, there were Rascals-PR man David Salidor; Dan Zelinski; Billy Amendola; Magda Katz from Times Square Chronicles; and Susan Nuzzi Russo. Thanks to SONY Hall’s Peter Abraham for his assistance.

David Sanborn

DAVID SANBORN — We don’t usually re-print tributes, but this, from David Sanborn’s wife Alice Soyer was so heartfelt.  Take a read:

Dave, my love, my warrior, my soulmate, my unique bird, my everything. I cannot believe what I’m writing right now but what I know is that you changed my life, because of you I know what true love is, I had and have it all. I have it all. Although I’m going to miss you every single minute of my life, I know that the pain you were enduring was not right, those pains are now released and you are completely free. You are and will be in every note, in every breath, in every sound that touches the soul, in every sun beam, in every cloud, in every beat of my heart. Dave you are an inspiration. Your courage to be yourself, to reveal this true voice screaming from inside, oh my love you are a true warrior, a pure artist, an extraordinary being.I will honor you every step on the way, I will represent you, us. I love you madly.

Dave forever

Don Grolnick

SHORT TAKES — First off, I left off one very important member when I referenced The Brecker Brothers last time: keyboardist-genius Don Grolnick: terrifically talented and much-missed …

George Harrison

One of the best parts of watching Let It Be(again!) was seeing John & Yoko dancing to George Harrison’s stunningly-beautiful “I Me Mine.” Awesome…  From Roger Friedman’s SHOWBIZ 411:Barbra Streisand just released a new a beautiful new single called “Love Will Survive,” for the closing credits of the upcoming series “The Tattooist of Auschwitz.” It’s maybe Streisand’s best new vocal in years thanks to producers Walter Afanasieff (Mariah Carey’s classics) and Peter Asher (Linda Ronstadt, James Taylor classics). So now I’m told Streisand has booked the producing duo for her next album of duets. Barbra has a couple of these under her belt over her six decade career. But this one sounds like a powerhouse … Great interview with Micky Dolenz in advance of his Surf Ballroom show Friday in Clear Lake, Iowa: https://littlevillagemag.com/monkee-micky-dolenz-surf-ballroom/?fbclid=IwAR2jXAYYYCJ_19ovY4yT8DU8OfdaTU-GYdYhXahF-rvYj3yERRW_K5MmgrI

Francis Ford Coppola

With this year’s Cannes  Film Festival underway, the first big movie screened was Francis Ford Coppola’s Megalopolis and it generated some of the craziest reviews I’ve ever seen.

Mostly positive. Coppola’s a genius, so you know to expect the unexpected. I think my favorite was from the UK’s Daily Telegraph which gave the movie four stars, saying, “Coppola’s latest is like Succession crossed with Batman Forever and a lava lamp… Aubrey Plaza is fantastic in this full-body sensory bath movie which follows a struggle for power among the elites of New Rome.” Me? I can’t wait to see it. The guy’s a bloody genius … 17-year-old wunderkind Kjersti Long -co writer of Vanessa Williams’ current return to music “Legs (Keep Dancing)”- heads to NYC for the Tribeca Festival in 2 weeks … And Apple TV’s Sugar -with Colin Farrell- ended its run. The first few episodes were great; very LA Confidential, but then, it turned into a sci-fi adventure. Odd? You bet. The ending left room for a second season, but I highly doubt it. Farell was great, but the topsy-turvy plot twist was brutal.

NAMES IN THE NEWS — August Darnell; Coati Mundi; Jeff Vogel; Kent Kotal; Bruce Grakal; Ringo Starr; Danny Fried; China Club; Tony King; Peter Brown; Mark Bego; Kent & Laura Denmark Tom & Lisa Cuddy; Peter Abraham; Peter Lubin; Steve Plotnicki; Profile Records; Joe Cocker; Lush Ice; Anthony Pomes; Terry Jastrow; and BELLA!

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The Glorious Corner

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SANBORN RIP — I was absolutely devastated to loss another friend Monday, musician David Sanborn. Still reeling from the loss of Sam Rubin, I just could not believe the news when I heard it.

I first met David when he played with The Brecker Brothers band (brothers Michael and Randy, Will Lee, Steve Khan, Don Grolnick, Chris Parker) and we immediately hit it off and became fast-running buddies. David, who had already played with the Paul Butterfield, was on his way to super-stardom: playing with everyone from Stevie Wonder to David Bowie, with his superb sax work. When you heard his work, you immediately knew it was him. Listen to his work on Bowie’s “Young Americans.” Just stunning.


His solo work with equally as stellar. His first solo-album Taking Off was just great. His signature “Chicago Song” was sensational too. I’ll never forget his great work on Lorne Michael’s Night Music show – especially the time he paired up Eric Clapton and Robert Cray. If you’ve never seen this, take a look here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BngAj8xV3Os

He also worked with the late-Michael Kamen (and sting) on the Lethal Weapon soundtrack with Sting. Just exemplary work.

Check out his work with the Letterman band on a show in Vegas with Sammy Davis, Jr.: Sammy Davis Jr. on Late Night With David Letterman in Las Vegas (1987)

He was a lot of fun to hang with. I’ll miss his company – no question. Tremendous loss for sure.

David Salidor and Gene Cornish Photo by Bobby Bank/Getty Images

SHORTS TAKES — The Rascals’ “Good Lovin'” is in Jerry Seinfeld’s Unfrosted Netflix movie. Unfortunately, the movie’s taking a heavy beating in the media. I don’t think I’ll tune in, but a great music selection for sure … The first full-trailer for Coppola’s Megalopolis has just been released. Its rather sensational. Take a look here from Roger Friedman’s Showbiz 411: https://www.showbiz411.com/2024/05/14/watch-first-full-pre-cannes-teaser-trailer-for-coppolas-biggest-gamble-ever-with-astonishing-megalopolis-images

Alicia Keys announced the album for her play Hell’s Kitchen (13 TONY noms) will be out June 7. Interesting that she said album. Good for her … MTV has canceled their movie awards presentation for 2024. Low ratings the case? I’d bet on it. Also, parent-company Paramount might have a new owner or new owners. Check this out: https://www.showbiz411.com/2024/05/12/mtv-cancels-movie-and-tv-awards-for-2024-skips-barbenheimer-movies-after-2023-ratings-debacle

I started watching the original Let It Be film on Disney and loved it, just as I did when I originally saw it in 1970. As I’ve said before, this original (from director Michael Lindsay-Hogg) would never have come out again if there wasn’t a demand for it. What Peter Jackson did was great, but it wasn’t what The Beatles and Apple wanted. I loved it. Check this terrific article out on it: https://www.soundandvision.com/content/making-beatles-let-it-be-and-peter-jacksons-get-back?fbclid=IwZXh0bgNhZW0CMTEAAR2l_MOZXCWPMg2E5gNKfin7wIVgTKlmRvGWBwOHvqM4B_dphbY2bw-JcoM_aem_AXa5zighOQPj-_fICOPXlPDJP1wXUdXEx82NiZSzlevB … Happy BDay Crispin Cioe ; Jane Blunkell and Gene Cornish.

NAMES IN THE NEWS — Savannah Guthrie; Carson Daly; Paul Pesco;Alicia Keys; Tony Mandich; Judy Libow; Amanda Naylor; Tom & Lisa Cuddy; Len Berman; Michael Riedel; Bob Feiden; Sam Rubin; Paul Cooper; Anthony Noto; Ed Steinberg; Richard Johnson; Steve Carrel; Matt Damon; Matt Drudge; Bobby Orlando; Mark Berry; Marissa Armstrong; Heather Moore; and CHIP!

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