Connect with us

Entertainment

Fleet Week Starts May 24-30

Published

on

Fleet Week first started in 1982, this week is a week-long celebration that invites the world to enjoy various events held to honor the US Navy, Marine Corps, and Coast Guard. This year’s 35th annual NYC Fleet Week will take place from May 24 through May 30.

During the week, multiple ships and thousands of sea service members are set to visit the five boroughs offering everything from public ship visitations to a variety of military demonstrations.

Here is what happening:

Wednesday, May 24

  • Fort Hamilton 11-Gun Salute to the Ships of Fleet Week: 6:30 am – 6:45 am
  • Parade of Ships: 7:45 am – 11:00 am
  • Sea Services at Miller Field in Staten Island: 10:00 am – noon
  • Fleet Week New York Iconic Military Photo in Times Square: 5:00 pm
  • USMC Band & USMC Silent Drill Platoon Performance in Times Square: 6:30 p.m. – 7:30 p.m.

Thursday, May 25

  • General Public Ship Tours: 8:00 am – 5:00 pm
  • Fleet Week Freedom Run: 9:45 am – 11:00 am
  • Navy Dive Tank in Times Square: 10:00 am – 5:00 pm
  • Lincoln Park USMC Aviation Event: 10:00 am – 2:00 pm

Friday, May 26

  • General Public Ship Tours: 8:00 am – 5:00 pm
  • Navy Dive Tank in Times Square: 10:00 am – 5:00 pm
  • Reenlistment and Promotion Ceremony at 9/11 Memorial Plaza: 2:00 pm – 2:30 pm
  • Navy Ceremonial Guard to Perform in Times Square: 7:00 pm – 7:30 pm
  • Navy Band North East Concert: 7:30 pm – 9:15 pm

Saturday, May 27

  • General Public Ship Tours: 8:00 am – 5:00 pm
  • Navy Dive Tank in Times Square: 10:00 am – 5:00 pm
  • The Sea Services in Eisenhower Park: 10:00 am – 2:30:00 pm
  • USCG Band Performs at The Intrepid Sea, Air & Space Museum: 11:00 am – noon
  • USCG Search and Rescue Demonstration at Intrepid Sea, Air & Space Museum: 10:00 am – 2:30:00 pm
  • Navy Band Northeast Woodwind Quintet Performance: 4:00 pm – 5:00 pm
  • USMC and USN Band Concert: 7:30 pm – 9:15 pm

Sunday, May 28

  • General Public Ship Tours: 8:00 am – 5:00 pm
  • Forest Hill Memorial Parade: 11:00 am
  • Maspeth Memorial Day Parade: 11:00 am
  • Fleet Week at Liberty State Park: 11:00 am – 5:00 pm
  • Point Citizens Memorial Day Parade: 2:00 pm
  • Village of Hastings on the Hudson Memorial Day Parade: 2:00 pm
  • USMC and USN Band Concert: 4:00 – 5:30 pm

Monday, May 29

  • General Public Ship Tours: 8 a.m. – 5 p.m.
  • Crestwood Memorial Day Parade and Ceremony: 9:00 am
  • Bayville Memorial Day Parade: 10:00 am
  • Intrepid Memorial Day Commemoration: 11:00 am – 1:00 pm
  • Soldiers’ and Sailors’ Memorial Day Observance: 10:00 am – 12:00 pm
  • American Legion Inwood Memorial Day Parade: 10:30 am
  • Pelham Memorial Day Parade: 11:00 am
  • Village of Dobbs Memorial Day Parade: 11:00 am
  • U.S. Marine Corps League Det 246 Staten Island Memorial Day Parade: 11:00 am
  • Village of Irvington Memorial Day Parade: 11:00 am
  • Annual Staten Island Memorial Day Parade: 11:00 am
  • Ridgewood/Glendale Memorial Day Parade: 11:00 am
  • United Military Veterans of Kings County Memorial Day Parade: 11:00 am
  • American Legion Post 156 Memorial Day Parade: 2:00 pm
  • U.S. Coast Guard Search and Rescue Demonstration: 2:00 – 2:30 pm
  • USN Band and USMC Band Concert at Bryant Park Upper Terrace: 3:30 – 5:00 pm

Tuesday, May 30

  • Ships depart: TBD

Suzanna, co-owns and publishes the newspaper Times Square Chronicles or T2C. At one point a working actress, she has performed in numerous productions in film, TV, cabaret, opera and theatre. She has performed at The New Orleans Jazz festival, The United Nations and Carnegie Hall. She has a screenplay and a TV show in the works, which she developed with her mentor and friend the late Arthur Herzog. She is a proud member of the Drama Desk and the Outer Critics Circle and was a nominator. Email: suzanna@t2conline.com

Out of Town

Another Barricade Visit for Mirvish Toronto’s “Les Misérables”

Published

on

By

I was apprehensive and excited, all at the same time, as I entered the touring company staging of Alain Boublil and Claude-Michel Schonberg’s  Les Misérables, now taking form at the Princess of Wales Theatre, Toronto. The production, brought to us by Mirvish Productions, transported me back to that time, about forty years ago, when I first saw this glorious musical over in London’s West End. Twice actually, with the magnificent Patti LuPone. Lupone was divine, broking my heart at every moment given. This might have been the show that somehow created this theatre junkie, so much so that I had to return again a few weeks later, spending more than this young man could really afford. And I believe I also returned to see that same beautiful revolving stage design when it made its award-winning debut on Broadway, about two more times before it closed.  It was heavenly and forever memorable.  I remember being swept away by the intensely moving story, and sumptuous music and songs. Tears were in my eyes at so many emotionally heart-breaking moments, that I left fully satisfied and happy each and every time.

The staging this time around, with set and projected image design created by Matt Kinley (25th Anniversary Production of Phantom of the Opera) is said to be “inspired by the paintings of Victor Hugo”, and with a stunning musical staging by Geoffrey Garratt and directed most beautifully by Laurence Connor (Mirvish’s Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat) and James Powell (London’s The Witches of Eastwick), the production still found its way into my emotional heart. It carried forth all of the same powerful moments, even without that famous revolve. It was different, and in some ways, it felt smaller and not as expansive and connecting, but maybe, with time and an awareness that I didn’t have when I first saw the same touring revival on Broadway back in 2016, this familiar staging fully engaged, taking me happily on that same emotional journey, even while missing the expansive previous revolving set design.

The music and those powerful tragic moments still deliver with a vengeance, mainly because of the incredible vocal performances of this touring cast. Tears came to my eyes at numerous moments, and I knew that I would enjoy myself from the moment the Bishop of Digne, played by a wonderful Randy Jeter (Public’s Parable of the Sower) told the constables that he had in fact given Jean Valjean, embodied by a magnificent Nick Cartell (Broadway’s Paramour) the church’s silver (that he, in fact, had stolen). And furthermore, he had forgotten to take the more valuable pieces of silver during the epic Prologue and ‘Soliloquy’. That and each subsequent moment, lasting all the way from the beautiful ‘I Dreamed a Dream’ sung with such loving sadness by Haley Dortch, the saddest of all sad songs; the engaging ‘On My Own’ by the powerful voiced Mya Rena Hunter; to Valjean’s stunningly rendered of ‘Who Am I?’ and all points in-between, moved me most generously. The songs, delivered graciously by these glorious-voiced actors brought it all back to life, and embedded itself inside my soul once again.

The glorious “Bring Him Home“, sung with incredible intensity and love by the gifted Cartell, felt as tender and angelic as ever. Understudy Cameron Loyal (Broadway’s Bad Cinderella) as the determined Javert couldn’t match the heightened level of expertise that Cartell climbed himself up to and was maybe the weakest link in this beautifully performed construction, but it never tarnished the overall effect. The Thenardier husband and wife team, gorgeously well-played by Matt Crowle (Mercury Theater’s The Producers) and Victoria Huston-Elem (Goodspeed’s Gypsy), performed the wonderfully crafted ‘Master of the House’ number with great comic timing and delivery, and the Student’s songs, ‘The People’s Song’ and ‘Drink With Me to Days Gone By’ were also lovingly performed, although there were a few over-done attempts of humor and inauthentic drunkenness. Marius, lovingly portrayed by the handsome Jake David Smith (Off-Broadway’s Between the Lines) delivers a tender (but not so well stage-designed) version of one of my favorite songs, ‘Empty Chairs at Empty Tables’.  His voice graced us with its loving tones, lifting us in its softness, and working well our emotional heartstrings with this sad sweet song.

All in all, my friend and I had gathered together to hear all these aforementioned, beautifully crafted, and much-loved songs, sung with care, expertise, and love. Les Misérables sounds as glorious as ever, and I must add that I was happy to have had the chance to insert these songs back into my head. I’ve been humming these numerous melodies, all of which brought me great joy and happiness, all weekend long.  This small simple staging still packs a musically beautiful and powerful punch, and I’m forever grateful for that gift, revolving or not.

For more go to frontmezzjunkies.com

Continue Reading

Broadway

“The Heart of Rock and Roll” Does Exactly What It Needs To Do Joyfully 80s Style on Broadway

Published

on

By

Hey, Bobby!” she calls to snap him out of his constant, adorable daydreaming. But it’s a different Bobby than the one who’s having a birthday over at Company, and it’s a whole different beast of a show, to be honest, as The Heart of Rock and Roll, the new jukebox musical comedy, inspired by the iconic songs of Huey Lewis and The News, drives forward with appealing delight. It’s a feast of fun and frivolity, setting itself up in 1987, as this Bobby, played charmingly by the wonderfully gifted Corey Cott (Broadway’s Bandstand), has his musical mind wandering all over the place about the future. He’s forever daydreaming of a way to climb that corporate ladder and make a name for himself after giving up his nighttime dreams of being a rock and roll star.

The man has traded in his family heirloom, an electric guitar, for a seat at the corporate table. But first, he has to navigate himself off of the conveyor belt line, working for a cardboard box company struggling to make ends meet. Bobby has some big ideas that he wants to deliver to his boss, the “Hip to Be Square” Stone, playing lovingly by John Dossett (Broadway’s War Paint), and his tense corporate daughter, Cassandra, who’s as tightly wound as one could be. Played adoringly by the wonderful and talented McKenzie Kurtz (Broadway’s Wicked; Frozen), Cassandra is one unique creation. She has given up her independent dreams of making it big on her own in the big city to return home after the death of her mother and help out her grieving father and the family business. And to no audience members’ surprise, these two opposites are as blindly attracted to each other as two souls can be, and they can’t seem to fight “The Power of Love.” And we know right from the get-go that we don’t want them to.

Corey Cott, McKenzie Kurtz, and the Company of Broadway’s The Heart of Rock and Roll. Photo by Matthew Murphy.

The Heart of Rock and Roll is exactly what you would imagine a musical comedy inspired by the songs of Huey Lewis and The News would be. It’s not breaking any new ground here, nor is it reformating or reinventing jukebox musicals. Many have called it the ‘first AI-invented musical’ as it checks all the boxes, moving like a well-timed machine through the framework of a well-intentioned musical. And I get why they say that, but as tenderly directed by Gordon Greenberg (RTC’s Holiday Inn) and inventively choreographed by profoundly good Lorin Latarro (Broadway’s Tommy), the show is definitely a whole lot more fun and enjoyable than many others who have tried and failed in the same format. It has a tender heart and a great comic backbone that never disappoints. The songs are as engagingly head-bopping as you remember, and performed with enthusiasm and love by a cast of pros that never let the piece falter or stall. The story is a rom-com joyride, fulfilling all the requirements of a feel-good jukebox show, but dressed up in the 80s, with costumes designed perfectly by Jen Caprio (Broadway’s Spamalot), a solidly functional set by Derek McLane (Broadway’s Purlie Victorious), well-formated lighting by Japhy Weideman (Broadway’s Dear Evan Hansen), a solid sound design by John Shivers (Broadway’s Shucked), and layered with a few other popular themes around dreams, fulfillment, and family. That’s what gives it the Heart that they all keep singing about.

It’s a magnificent cardboard dance and ride on a well-tuned conveyor belt that soars into your heart and soul like your favorite soda pop, thanks to the music supervision, arrangements, and orchestrations by Brian Usifer (Broadway’s Book of Mormon) led by musical director Will Van Dyke (Off-Broadway’s Little Shop of Horrors). The book and story by Jonathan A. Abrams (“Juror No. 2“) with an assist from producer Tyler Mitchell (“Lucky Number Slevin“) is as charming as it is fun, filled with so many musical moments that make you sit up and take notice, especially when Bobby’s best gal pal, Roz, played to the heavens by the miraculous Tamika Lawrence (TNG’s Black No More), strides onto the stage. She’s one of the best things in this show filled with many best things.

Corey Cott, Raymond J. Lee, John Michael Lyles, and F. Michael Haynie in Broadway’s The Heart of Rock and Roll. Photo by Matthew Murphy

The Heart of Rock and Roll isn’t reinventing any kinda wheel, but there is enough playful energy flying forward from the cast that even though we see the ending pretty early on, we also want to enjoy the ride like that roller coaster we keep going on over and over again. Cause it’s just a whole heap of fun. The side kicks; Bobby’s former band mates: F. Michael Haynie (Broadway’s Charlie and the Chocolate Factory) as Glenn, Raymond J. Lee (Public’s Soft Power) as JJ, John-Michael Lyles (Broadway’s A Strange Loop) as Eli; and Casandra’s old school friends: Zoe Jensen (Broadway’s Six) as Paige and Josh Breckenridge (Broadway’s Come From Away) as Wyatt, all perform fabulously playing their parts with a wink and smile as they systematically deliver all the goods required. Orville Mendoza (CSC’s Pacific Overtures) as businessman Fjord, is a riot and delivers the ridiculous with the biggest Swedish wink you could give, and Billy Harrington Tighe (Broadway’s Pippin) as Tucker does a fantastic job playing the old boyfriend from Cassandra’s past who represents everything we don’t want for her. As written, it’s the perfect balance of sleaze and charm that makes us understand why she would have dated him before when she was at school, but also makes us want her to forget all about him and focus her eyes on Cott’s Bobby, cause that the ending we truly want.

The Heart of Rock and Roll does not disappoint, not in the slightest. It’s warm-hearted, well-played, beautifully performed, fantastically charming, and full of fun, without ever trying to be of a higher frame than it needs to be. I’m not surprised it didn’t garner a ton of nominations this award season. It’s not that kind of show, but don’t be fooled by this. It’s pretty much one of the funniest fun musical rides on Broadway. It doesn’t pretend to be ‘high art’ but doesn’t really need to be for us to laugh and cheer for these two to finally give it all up for Love.

Corey Cott, McKenzie Kurtz, and the Company of Broadway’s The Heart of Rock and Roll. Photo by Matthew Murphy.

For more go to frontmezzjunkies.com 

Continue Reading

Broadway

Broadway’s Revival of “The Wiz” Delivers the Touring Goods Without Inspired Elevation

Published

on

By

There’s a strange wind in the air blowing into NYC’s Marquis Theatre a production of the famed musical, The Wiz, aimed at recapturing the family-friendly aura that lives to this day swirling around it. I’ve only really seen, in its entirety, this 1975 musical when it was produced “Live!” on television in 2015 (beyond YouTube clipsfrom the famous movie adaptation starring Diana Ross and Michael Jackson, just to name a few). “The Wiz Live!,” was an enjoyable, star-packed swirling that had more highs than lows, if I’m remembering correctly, so when this current revival gets its groove started, all in black and white, I was feeling the excitement build with high hopes for an electrifying colorful adventure. Courtesy of director Schele Williams (Broadway’s The Notebook), we are greeted with a heartfelt introduction of their Dorothy, played by Broadway newcomer, Nichelle Lewis (national tour of Hairspray) and her loving Aunt Em, portrayed strongly and gently by the very good Melody A. Betts (Broadway’s Waitress). “The Feeling We Once Had” connects, offering hope, home, and compassion wrapped up in their warm embrace. And then the faulty Tornados roll in as the shift to color rushes forward and all hell breaks loose.

Wayne Brady in The Wiz. Photo by Jeremy Daniel.

Starting out on the road in late 2023, this production of The Wiz tries to harness that wind and pull us into the colorful and hopeful idea that this production, designed by Hanna Beachler (Marvel’s “Black Panther“) with lighting by Bryan J. O’Gara (Broadway’s Thoughts of a Colored Man), costumes by Sharen Davis (HBO’s “The Watchman“), sound by Jon Weston (Broadway’s Parade), and video/projections by Daniel Brodie (Broadway’s Motown), is trying for. Unfortunately for Broadway audiences, the show feels somewhat limited, unpacked from a truck and quickly carted in with hopes of impressing. That’s not to say that the production lacks appeal, as it is, thanks to the projections and colorful costuming that attempt to be visually creative, many of the moments don’t feel as well constructed as any other show made and created for a specific Broadway stage. The units are chunky and compact, representing structures that would easily roll out and roll onto any stage anywhere across the country. It’s an odd sensation, when one is used to seeing Broadway productions that carry an organic rooted energy created just for that stage. But there is no surprise here, because that is exactly what this production is; a touring show that is making a stop in a Broadway house. And there is no crime in that. Just, maybe, some disappointment for those of us who are used to something else; something more refined and deeply seeded.

Deborah Cox, Nichelle Lewis, and the cast of The Wiz. Photo by Jeremy Daniel.

You look like a gold angel,” Dorothy cries out to Gilda, played by the very talented understudy Judith Franklin (Broadway’s Tina…) stepping in for an absent Deborah Cox (Broadway’s Jekyll & Hyde), and we secretly wish the visuals were as gloriously golden as Lewis’ Dorothy sees surrounding her. Lewis is charming and engaging as the lost young girl trying to reconnect with and remember the warmth and value of “Home“, even if her vocals are a little bit less than dazzling. Choreographed strongly (yet somewhat straightforwardly) by Jaquel Knight (Beyoncé’s “Single Ladies“), the three traveling characters that join her on her quest deliver the goods with zeal and talent, giving the show an added burst of excitement that radiates out into the audience with something akin to glee. The Scarecrow’s “You Can’t Win“, performed endearingly by Avery Wilson (“Grown-ish“), astonishes, even if the fancy footwork is repeatedly invoked throughout the show; the Tinman, devilishly portrayed by the charming and handsome Phillip Johnson Richardson (Berkeley Rep’s Goddess), finds authenticity and connectivity even under all that makeup by Charles G. LaPointe with his seductive “Slide Some Oil to Me“; and the Cowardly Lion, portrayed a bit reductive by Kyle Ramar Freeman (Broadway’s A Strange Loop), gives it their all as the “Mean Old Lion.” The four are on track, easing on down the road with an optimistic cadence to find the lost thing that they each feel they are missing. They place all their hope on that big Technicolor Wiz, played solidly by Wayne Brady (Broadway’s Kinky Boots) who will magically grant them their wish and desire; that is unless the Wicked Witch of the West, Evillene, the most evil sister of the witch that Dorothy’s house did a number on, played big and loud by Betts (who was so warm and kind as Aunt Em) doesn’t get them first with some silliness around “Poppies” and a “Kalidah Battle.

Kyle Ramar Freeman, Nichelle Lewis, Phillip Johnson Richardson, and Avery Wilson in The Wiz. Photo by Jeremy Daniel.

With a fun score by Charlie Smalls and a book by William F. Brown, this show, when it first came to Broadway won seven Tony Awards, including Best Musical, and ran for 1,672 performances. It broke new grounds on Broadway, yet this current iteration, with additional materials by Amber Ruffin (“A Black Lady Sketch Show“), doesn’t exactly live up to the hope of its ancestors, feeling a bit tired from the road upon its arrival. The creative team didn’t seem to adjust or elevate the scene for Broadway, delivering a touring production that is good but not Broadway remarkable. The performers work hard against the flatness of the video projection screens that should enhance, not take over the visual landscape, yet here they carry the weight as the clunky set pieces just roll in without much delight attached to them. The choreography being the real star of this revival is energetic and psuedo-exciting, even in its straightforward approach to the material. Luckily the dancers deliver the goods with gusto. The ballads, like “Home” find their way through the meekness of the production, giving us the feelings, but as a whole, I’d stick to rewatching the Live! TV version or even the campy film version. There’s more to be dazzled by there on the screen than in this Broadway theatre.

Nichelle Lewis and Melody Betts in The Wiz. Photo by Jeremy Daniel.

For more go to frontmezzjunkies.com

 

Continue Reading

Art

Come To The Light Brings Artist Janet Hennessey Dilenschneider Art To The Sheen Center

Published

on

“The world is in turmoil and I hope to offer people a respite by providing some calm” Janet Hennessey Dilenschneider. “I am motivated to paint and share my passion. I strive to create a place of serenity that nature offers us. Landscape, skyscape and seascape are my means of communication. Ours is a beautiful planet and I encourage all to take good care of it.”

T2C’s Magda Katz talked to the artist about her work

“If we wish to have the light, we must keep the sun; if we wish to keep our forests we must keep our trees; if we wish to keep our perfumes, we must keep our flowers- and if we wish to keep our rights, then we must keep our God.” Archbishop Fulton Sheen.

The Gallery at The Sheen Center for Thought & Culture, 18 Bleecker Street, presents “Come To The Light,” an exhibition of paintings by the artist Janet Hennessey Dilenschneider May 16 – June 14. The exhibition, exclusively at The Sheen Center, is free and open to the public daily from 11AM – 5PM. All artwork on exhibition is available for purchase. The Gallery at The Sheen Center is open daily from 9AM to 11PM. For further details, visit www.SheenCenter.org/events/detail/Come-To-The-Light.

“Come To The Light,” returns to The Gallery at The Sheen Center, having previously exhibited there in 2021 and 2022. Ms. Dilenschneider has had five solo exhibitions in Paris and Avignon, plus she participated in two invitational art fairs, one in Paris at the Grande Palais and another in Monaco at the Grimaldi Palace.

His Eminence Timothy Cardinal Dolan, Archbishop of New York, says “Jan Dilenschneider is a wonderful friend and I am grateful she shares her talents and treasures with us. We are fortunate that Jan’s beautiful works of art will once again be on display at The Sheen Center, and encourage everyone to pay a visit and share in her vision of bringing people into the Light!”

Janet Hennessey Dilenschneider created her first oil on canvas painting at the age of 12. At 16, her entry at the Ohio State Fair was rejected because it had no hanging wire affixed to the canvas. A kind, older gentleman came to the rescue and quickly fashioned a wire to the back. That kind man was Roy Lichtenstein, one of the world’s most acclaimed artists. The watercolor won 1st Prize in the competition and Dilenschneider has been painting ever since.

Based in Connecticut, she finds much of her inspiration in the wondrous variegation of nature. Dilenschneider is an expressionist painter who has been influenced by many styles of art including impressionism. She is known for her rich palette, loose brush strokes, and luminous misty vistas. Her affinity for landscapes and the atmospheric effects of light and color create a mystery in her artwork that draws you into the unique painting. Jan has plans for several exhibitions for later in the year. She wants you to fall in love with nature all over again.

For more information, visit www.JanDilendchneider.com.

Sheen Center for Thought & Culture (www.sheencenter.org) is a haven for the arts and provides a platform for provocative conversations about diverse and inclusive aspects of humanity as seen through the creative lens of faith and respect. Located on historic Bleecker Street, the Sheen Center is a venue where art and spirituality meet. The Sheen features a 273-seat neoclassical proscenium theater and a newly renovated, 80-seat, flexible Black Box – The Frank Shiner Theater. The Sheen Center also features an art gallery, rehearsal studios and meeting | reception spaces. Since opening in 2015, the Sheen has hosted several movie premieres as well as innovative productions by companies including Houses on the Moon, Red Bull Theater, TheaterWorksUSA, and Bedlam. Included among the hundreds of artists who have performed at The Sheen are Board Members, Vanessa Williams, and Frank Shiner as well Kristin Chenoweth, Nora Jones, James Taylor, Bernie Williams, Kirk Whalum, and Eileen Ivers. The Sheen is a preferred venue for WFUV Radio’s Membership Marquee Concerts and hosts SOHO Forum monthly debate series, and in 2022, was chosen for the filming of the series, “Inside the Black-Box” hosted by Emmy Award-winning actor Joe Morton and producer Tracey Moore, and featuring prominent creatives of color, ranging from actors to producers to directors, writers, and musicians.

Featured photo is “Light on the Water,” 30 x 30, oil on canvas (left); and “Sunrise,” 36 x 48, oil on canvas (right), by Janet Hennessey Dilenschneider

Continue Reading

Events

Live From The Hotel Edison Times Square Chronicles Presents Jana Robbins and Tim Tuttle

Published

on

“Live From The Hotel Edison Times Square Chronicles Presents”, is  filmed live every Wednesday from 5 – 6 now in the conference room at the Hotel Edison.

In this episode T2C’s publisher and owner Suzanna Bowling talks with Jana Robbins and Tim Tuttle. Jana Robbins is starring in A Final Toast, which opens at The Chain Theatre, 312 West 36th Street #3rd Floor, this Friday. Her performance this Thursday, which is an invited dress is dedicated to the memory of her beloved mother Edythe Elaine Eisenberg May 16, 1922 – Oct. 24, 2022.

Tim Tuttle, wrote the book, music and lyrics for 44 Lights: The Musical that opened last night at the AMT Theatre, 354 W 45th StreetTuttle worked as a trader on Wall Street, until September 11th, 2001. He turned to music to heal. 44 Lights is a chance for Tim to tell his story, to remember the many who didn’t come home, and find a way to keep their memories alive forever.

We are so proud because the show and our guests are now featured on the TV screens in the lobby and the hotel rooms.
I am so grateful to my guests Jana Robbins and Tim Tuttle.

Thank-you Magda Katz for videoing and creating the content to go live, Rommel Gopez and The Hotel Edison for their kindness and hospitality.

We are so proud and thrilled that Variety Entertainment News just named us one of Summer’s Best Picks in the category of Best Television, Radio, PodcastsThe company we are in, has made us so humbled, grateful and motivated to continue.

You can catch us on the following platforms:

Pandora:

https://www.pandora.com/podcast/live-from-the-edison-hotel-times-square-chronicles-presents/PC:1001084740

Stitcher:

https://www.stitcher.com/show/1084740

Spotify:

Amazon:

https://music.amazon.com/podcasts/e3ac5922-ada8-4868-b531-12d06e0576d3

Apple Podcasts:

https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/live-from-the-edison-hotel-times-square-chronicles-presents/id1731059092

Continue Reading

Trending

Copyright © 2023 Times Square Chronicles

Times Square Chronicles