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Those We Lost in 2023

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December

Michael Blakemore on the West End, directed Noël Coward’s Design for Living starring Vanessa Redgrave, David Hare’s Knuckle, and Arthur Miller’s The Ride Down Mt. Morgan, before turning his sights on New York, making a notable Broadway splash throughout the 1990’s as the director of City of Angels, Peter Shaffer’s Lettice and Lovage starring Maggie Smith and Margaret Tyzack, The Life, and, finally, the 1999 revival of Kiss Me, Kate.

Andre Braugher, known for his roles on acclaimed crime series such as Homicide: Life on the Street and Brooklyn Nine-Nine, died after a recent illness.

Vinie Burrows made her Broadway debut in 1950 in The Wisteria Trees. Her Broadway credits include The Skin of Our Teeth, The Green Pastures, Mrs. Patterson, The Ponder Heart, and Mandingo. Her 1968 Off-Broadway production of Walk Together Children became the longest-running Off-Broadway one woman show at the time. She was also an activist for Civil Rights and women’s rights, serving as a United Nations NGO.

Anna “Chickadee” Cardwell, the oldest daughter of reality TV star Mama June Shannon, died at age 29.

Dancer, choreographer and actor Maurice Hines died on Friday at 80 years old. The Broadway star often appeared alongside his younger brother Gregory Hines during the first part of his career. The siblings most famously co-starred in the 1984 Francis Ford Coppola movie, Cotton Club. He made his debut in 1954 in the musical The Girl in Pink Tights, and went on to star in productions of Guys and Dolls, Eubie! and Uptown…It’s Hot!, for which he won a Tony Award nomination for best actor in a musical.Hines was also an in-demand choreographer and director. His credits include the national tour of the Louis Armstrong musical biography Satchmo, and the Earth Wind and Fire musical Hot Feet, which he conceived, choreographed and directed in 2006.

Lee Sun-kyun, starred in the 2019 Oscar-winning film Parasite, died at age 48.

Norman Lear — the award-winning American television writer, film producer and activist best known for creating All in the Family — died at the age of 101.

Raised in the heart of Zululand during Apartheid, Mbonegeni Ngema was the creative mind behind the musical Sarafina!, Coming to Broadway in 1988, Mr. Ngema directed and wrote the book for the musical and co-wrote the music and lyrics with Hugh Masekela.

Ryan O’Neal, the iconic actor who was Oscar-nominated for his role in the 1970 romance Love Story, died at age 82.

Tom Smothers, one half of the Smothers Brothers comedy duo, died at age 86 from cancer.

November

Rosalynn Carter, a lifelong advocate for mental health and human rights, died at 96.

Shelia Smith made her Broadway debut in 1963’s Hot Spot opposite Judy Holliday. As of 2023, Ms. Smith was one of the few performers left from the original Broadway production of Mame, where she served as the standby for both Angela Lansbury as Mame and Bea Arthur as Vera. For her efforts, Ms. Smith was awarded the Theater World Award. And at various periods in 1967, Ms. Smith took over for both Lansbury and Arthur to great acclaim.

Frances Sternhagen, appeared on Broadway in 26 plays and musicals including The Carefree Tree, Viva Madison Avenue!, Great Day in the Morning, The Right Honourable Gentleman, You Know I Can’t Hear You When the Water’s Running, The Cocktail Party, and Cock-a-Doodle Dandy. The award-winning actress best known for her roles on Cheers and Sex and the City, died at age 93.

October

Haydn Gwynne starred in Tom Bolton’s Hedda Gabler, Richard Cheshire’s Way of the World, played Billie Burke in the West End production of Ziegfeld, and starred in the original West End company of City of Angels. But it was Billy Elliot the Musical that would immortalize her for a generation. For her efforts in the West End production, she was nominated for an Olivier award. And for her reprisal of the role on Broadway, she received the Outer Critics Circle award, the Theatre World award, and the Drama Desk award, in addition to a Tony nomination.

Steven Lutvak was a singer-songwriter, who performed across the country, including successful New York engagements at Carnegie Hall. From this solo material, Mr. Lutvak released two albums, The Time It Takeand Ahead of My Heart, all the while continuing to pursue his collaborative musical theatre dreams. Mr. Lutvak made his Broadway debut with A Gentleman’s Guide to Love and Murder in 2014, for which he supplied the music, and co-wrote the lyrics with Robert L. Freedman. The musical won the Drama League, Outer Critics Circle, Drama Desk and Tony Awards for Best Musical.

Joanna Merlin began her career as an actor. She appeared in Cecil B. DeMille’s 1956 remake of The Ten Commandments as Jethro’s Daughter before making her Broadway debut in Becket. Her most notable stage role would come in 1964, when she created the role of Tevye’s eldest daughter Tzeitel in the original company of Fiddler on the Roof. As a casting director, she cast Hal Prince’s entire string of 1970s landmark Stephen Sondheim musicals, including Company, Follies, A Little Night Music, Pacific Overtures, Sweeney Todd, and Merrily We Roll Along.

Richard Moll, the actor best known for his role on Night Court, died at age 80.

Matthew Perry was best known for playing Chandler Bing on Friends, died in his 50’s.

Suzanne Somers, best known for her roles on Three’s Company and Step by Step, died at age 76.

September

Jimmy Buffet

Jimmy Buffett, the musician and mogul whose easy-breezy hit “Margaritaville” became a way of life for legions of devoted Parrotheads, died at age 76.

Sir Michael Gambon, the Irish-born British actor of the stage and screen known for playing Dumbledore in the Harry Potter films died at age 82. He had 13 Olivier nominations, bringing home the top prize in 1985 for A Chorus of Disapproval, in 1987 for A View From the Bridge, and in 1990 for Man of the Moment. Mr. Gambon made his Broadway debut in Michael Hare’s Skylight, receiving a Tony nomination for his efforts.

David McCallum, who was best known for playing Dr. Donald “Ducky” Mallard on NCIS. He was 90 years old.

Michael McGrath

Michael McGrath

Michael McGrath was a prolific comedic character actor, appearing in 14 shows with a career that spanned more than three decades. He made his Broadway debut in the ensemble of My Favorite Year in 1992, and went on to appear in The Goodbye Girl, Swinging On a Star, Little Me, Wonderful Town, Spamalot, Is He Dead?, Memphis, Born Yesterday, Nice Work if You Can Get It, On the Twentieth Century, She Loves Me, Tootsie, and, most recently, Plaza Suite.

Retired NFL wide receiver Mike Williams died after suffering what his family described as “massive” head injury at a construction. He was 36.

August

Bob Barker, the legendary host of The Price Is Right, died at age 99.

Walter Charles made his Broadway debut in the original production of Grease, as the replacement for the character Vince Fontaine. He next opened 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue in the original cast. His career flourished throughout the following decade, where he appeared in the original casts of beloved and history-making Broadway musicals like Sweeney Todd, Cats, and La Cage Aux Folles.

Tina Howe wrote 14 full-length plays, including Closing Time, The Nest, Birth and After Birth, Museum, The Art of Dining, Painting Churches, Coastal Disturbances, Approaching Zanzibar, One Shoe Off, East of the Sun and West of the Moon, Pride’s Crossing, Rembrandt’s Gift, Chasing Manet, and Cheri. Both Painting Churches and Pride’s Crossing were finalists for the Pulitzer Prize for Drama, with Coastal Disturbances netting a Tony nomination.

Ron Cephas Jones

Award-winning actor Ron Cephas Jones was well-known for his role on This Is Us, died at age 66.

Tom Jones was a legendary lyricist and librettist who, with the late composer Harvey Schmidt, created the longest-running musical in theatre history: The Fantasticks. The musical ran until January 13, 2002, playing 17,162 performances—the longest continuous run of any show in American history, and the longest continuous run of any musical in the world.

Chris Peluso, an actor and singer known for his theater work including Mamma Mia! on Broadway, died at 40.

Robbie Robertson, one of rock’s greatest storytellers and The Band’s guitarist and primary songwriter, died at age 80.

July

The music legend, Tony Bennett, had been quietly living with Alzheimer’s disease since 2016, died at age 96.

Pamela Blair made her Broadway debut at the age of 19 in the ensemble of Promises, Promises, which would turn out to be the first of many associations with choreographer Michael Bennett. She was also the original Val in the Tony-winning musical A Chorus Line.

Jane Birkin, known for her song “Je T’Aime… Moi Non Plus,” died at age 76.

Jeffrey Carlson, who played the groundbreaking transgender character Zoe in All My Children, died at age 48. On the Broadway stage, he starred in Edward Albee’s The Goat or Who is Sylvia?, a revival of Molière’s Tartuffe, and in Boy George’s Broadway musical Taboo.

Bill Cunningham, the original voice of Barbie’s boyfriend Ken for Mattel during the early 1960s. The singer-turned-talent agency founder died at age 96.

Elise Finch, a longtime and Emmy-winning meteorologist for CBS New York affiliate WCBS-TV, died at age 51.

Ellen Fitzhugh was best known for her work as lyricist for the Broadway musical Grind, which earned her a Tony nomination for Best Original Score and a Drama Desk nomination for Best Lyrics, both in 1985. Her additional stage work includes Paradise Found with Richard Nelson co-directed by Harold Prince and Susan Stroman; Herringbone with Tom Cone and Skip Kennon; Muscle with Lapine and William Finn; book and lyrics to Los Otros and The Nine Fathers of Ariel with Michael John LaChiusa. Her most recent musical was Los Otros, written with LaChiusa, which played Off-Broadway in 2022.

Bo Goldman, a two-time Oscar-winning screenwriter best known for co-writing One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest, died at age 90.

Carlin Glynn was the Tony-winning star of Broadway’s The Best Little Whorehouse in Texas, and the mother of stage and screen star Mary Stuart Masterson. Whorehouse came along shortly after Glynn made her big screen debut as Mae Barber in Three Days of the Condor in 1975. She also made memorable appearances in Sixteen Candles and The Trip to Bountiful.

Sinéad O’Connor, the Irish singer whose legacy with hits like “Nothing Compares 2 U” was complicated by her outspoken dedication to various social issues and a series of mental health struggles, died at age 56.

Paul Reubens, the actor, best known for playing Pee-wee Herman, died at age 70.

June

Alan Arkin, the Oscar-winning actor died at age 89.

John Deyle was in the original Broadway production of Annie, the 1980 revival of Camelot, the original Broadway company of Footloose, and Urinetown. On tour, Mr. Deyle played Bert Bratt in the 1996 production of How to Succeed in Business Without Really Trying, and he appeared in three different tours of Camelot in various roles, including Forest Merlyn.

Astrud Gilberto, the singer who made “The Girl from Ipanema” a global hit, died at the age of 83.

Sheldon Harnick, alongside composer Jerry Bock, forged one of Broadway’s most successful composing teams, responsible for such classics as Fiddler on the Roof and She Loves Me. Mr. Harnick and Mr. Bock were nominated for Tony Awards for Fiddler on the Roof and She Loves Me, as well as Fiorello!, a musical about New York City Mayor Fiorello LaGuardia; The Apple Tree, a triptych of short musicals about the complicated relationship between man and woman; and The Rothschilds, about the famed Jewish family of financiers. They won for Fiorello! and Fiddler. Other works included Portofino and Tenderloin.

Jim Hines, the U.S. Olympian known for being the first man to run the 100m race in 10 seconds, died at the age of 76.

Cynthia Weil trained as an actress and singer before turning to songwriting, where she was a protégé of Frank Loesser. In the summer of 1961, Ms. Weill married Barry Mann, a fellow songwriter, cementing an artistic collaboration that would become one of the most influential in the mid-century era of rock and pop music in the United States. Of the duo’s many successful songs, some of their most popular included “On Broadway,” “Walking in the Rain,” “You’ve Lost That Lovin’ Feelin’,” “We Gotta Get out of This Place,” “(You’re My) Soul and Inspiration,” “Make Your Own Kind of Music,” and “Here You Come Again.”

Paxton Whitehead was an actor, writer, and dramaturg, Mr. Whitehead worked on nearly 20 Broadway productions, ranging from George Bernard Shaw’s Candida to Theresa Rebeck’s Bernhardt/Hamlet in 2018. In 1980, Mr. Whitehead obtained both a Tony and Drama Desk nomination for his performance as Pellinore opposite Richard Burton in Camelot.

Kevin Kline, Treat Williams, Pirates of Penzance

Kevin Kline, Treat Williams in Pirates of Penzance

Treat Williams, made his Broadway debut as a replacement Danny Zuko in the original run of Grease, which was shortly followed by his film debut in the thriller Deadly Hero, opposite James Earl Jones. He maintained careers both on screen and the stage, playing Michael Brick in the film adaptation of Terrence McNally’s The Ritz, Jerry Hyland in a rare Broadway revival of Kaufman and Hart’s Once in a Lifetime, and Berger in the film adaptation of the culture-defining musical Hair. He was the star of Everwood and Hair, died after being involved in a motorcycle accident. He was 71.

May 

Barbara Bryne was a regular fixture of Ontario’s Stratford Shakespeare Festival and Minneapolis, Minnesota’s Guthrie Theater, performing in a wide range of Shakespearean productions, including starring roles in King Lear, Richard III, A Midsummer Night’s Dream, and more. On Broadway, she was George’s mother in Sunday in the Park with George, and Jack’s Mother in Into The Woods.

Olympic track and field champion Tori Bowie died at age 32.

NFL legend Jim Brown, best known for playing on the Cleveland Browns, died at age 87.

Glenda Jackson

Glenda Jackson

Glenda Jackson was a Tony, Oscar, Emmy, and BAFTA winner. She originated the role of Charlotte Corday in Marat/Sade, appeared on Broadway in the plays Rose, Strange Interlude, and Macbeth. She also became a Member of Parliament.

Laura Pels gave so much to the International Foundation for Theatre, with which Ms. Pels formed the goal of nurturing “serious theatre”. She prioritized finding plays that supported classic theatre, advanced the work of great playwrights, and made theatre more accessible to the general public.

Joaquin Romaguera made his Broadway debut as Pirelli, in Sweeney Todd. Mr. Romaguera was a member of the New York City Opera company, where he created roles in several NYCO world premieres, including The Dead Man in Hugo Weisgall’s Nine Rivers from Jordan, and Professor Risselberg in Gian Carlo Menotti’s The Most Important Man.

Jacklyn Zeman, best known for her role as Bobbie Spencer on General Hospital, died at age 70.

Tina Turner the legendary singer, known as the Queen of Rock ‘n’ Roll, died after a long illness at her home.

April

Harry Belafonte was a cultural icon and civil rights activist starring and composing for his Broadway debut in John Murray Anderson’s Almanac, for which he received both a Theatre World Award and 1954’s Tony Award for Best Featured Actor in a Musical. That same year, Mr. Belafonte starred in the film adaptation of Oscar Hammerstein II’s Carmen Jones, opposite Dorothy Dandridge.

Todd Haimes was the longtime artistic director and guiding light of Roundabout Theatre Company, leading the company for 39 years. His tireless work transformed Roundabout from a 150-seat Off-Broadway company into one of the largest not-for-profit theatres in the United States.

Barry Humphries career spanned over seven-decades. He created the roles of “Dame Edna Everage,” “Sir Les Patterson,” “Sandy Stone,” “Barry McKenzie,” and many more. His characters largely served as social commentary on Australian culture.

Jerry Springer lead an eclectic life which brought him to the Broadway boards twice, as the slippery lawyer Billy Flynn in Chicago, and the Narrator in The Rocky Horror Show. His self-titled tabloid talk show was considered sensationalism, atits best.

Don Sebesky was a legend in the music arena. He was nominated for an eye-popping 31 Grammys throughout his career, winning three. For his television work, he received three Emmy nominations, and he was nominated four times for Best Orchestrations at the Tony Awards, winning twice for his work on Kiss Me, Kate and An American in Paris.

March

Lance Reddick  known for  The Wire died at the age of 60.

Liam Neeson, Tom Sizemore, Bruce Greenwood, Michael C. Hall, Brian d'Arcy James, Josh Lucas,

Liam Neeson, Tom Sizemore, Bruce Greenwood, Michael C. Hall, Brian d’Arcy James, Josh Lucas,

Tom Sizemore, best known for his roles in military action dramas Saving Private Ryan and Black Hawk Down.

Chaim Topol, the Israeli actor behind the iconic portrayal of Tevye in Fiddler On the Roof died at age 87.

February

Burt Bacharach

Burt Bacharach, the legendary songwriter behind hits like “Walk on By,” “Do You Know the Way to San Jose” and “I Say a Little Prayer,” died at 94.

Richard Belzer, the actor, comedian and author known for starring in Law & Order: Special Victims Unit, died at age 78.

Acclaimed film director Hugh Hudson, best known for directing the Oscar-winning film Chariots of Fire, died at the age of 86.

Eugene Lee was four-times Tony nominated, winning thrice for his work on Candide, Sweeney Todd, and Wicked, with his designs for the musical Ragtime netting his fourth nomination.

Golden Globe-winning actress Stella Stevens died at the age of 84.

Raquel Welch died at age 82.

January

Guitarist Jeff Beck, who rose to fame in the English rock band The Yardbirds, died on at age 78.

The Wire actor Al Brown died at age 83.

Actress Carole Cook, was a protégé of Lucille Ball, assuming the role of Dolly Levi from Carol Channing; she was the first to play the title role in the musical Hello, Dolly! after Ms. Channing. Additionally, she originated the role of Maggie Jones in 42nd Street, and was a fierce advocate for AIDS research and support for those affected by the disease. She was well-known for her role in Sixteen Candles, a died a few days before her 99th birthday.

David Crosby, a founding member of bands Byrds and Crosby, Stills & Nash, died at age 81.

Melinda Dillion was Tony-nominated for her portrayal of Honey in Edward Albee’s classic play Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf?, made her Broadway debut in the play at 23, leading to a vibrant Broadway career that included starring roles in You Know I Can’t Hear You When The Water’s Running, A Way of Life, Paul Sills’ Story Theatre, and Ovid’s Metamorphoses.

American Idol alum C.J. Harris, who placed sixth on the show’s 13th season in 2014, died at age 31.

Bernard Kalb — a celebrated journalist who reported for NBC, CBS, CNN and The New York Times— died at the age of 100.

Beth Howland and Charles Kimbrough

Charles Kimbrough was a Tony nominee, known for starring in TV’s Murphy Brown and his appearances in the original Broadway productions of Stephen Sondheim’s Company and Sunday in the Park with George. On screen, Mr. Kimbrough was Chef Boyardee in a series of commercials for the canned spaghetti and meatball product, and the voice of mature gargoyle Victor in Disney’s The Hunchback of Notre Dame.

Lisa Loring, the actress who played Wednesday Addams on the original 1960s TV adaptation of The Addams Family, died at age 64.

Ben Masters The Passions actor died from COVID-19 complications at 75.

After she was rushed to the hospital for a possible cardiac arrest earlier that morning, Lisa Marie Presley died at age 54.

Adam Rich, the former child star who played Nicholas Bradford in ABC’s Eight Is Enough, died at age 54.

Annie Wersching, known for her roles in 24, Star Trek: Picard, Bosch and Timeless, died at the age of 45.

Earth, Wind and Fire’s Fred White had died at the age of 67.

Cindy Williams, best known for her portrayal of the character Shirley Feeney on the sitcom Laverne & Shirley, died at age 75.

Suzanna, co-owns and publishes the newspaper Times Square Chronicles or T2C. At one point a working actress, she has performed in numerous productions in film, TV, cabaret, opera and theatre. She has performed at The New Orleans Jazz festival, The United Nations and Carnegie Hall. She has a screenplay and a TV show in the works, which she developed with her mentor and friend the late Arthur Herzog. She is a proud member of the Drama Desk and the Outer Critics Circle and was a nominator. Email: suzanna@t2conline.com

Broadway

Ken Fallin’s Broadway: Richard M. Sherman Songwriter for Mary Poppins and Jungle Book Passes On

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Richard M. Sherman, was a nine-time Academy Award nominee along with his brother Robert. The Sherman Brothers wrote more than 200 songs for some 27 films and 24 television productions. Their film credits include Mary Poppins, The Jungle Book, The Absent-Minded Professor, The Parent Trap, Summer Magic tv, The Sword in the Stone, That Darn Cat!, Winnie the Pooh and the Honey Tree, The Happiest Millionaire, The Aristocats, and Bedknobs and Broomsticks.

The won two Academy Awards for Mary Poppins, taking home the trophies for Best Score – Substantially Original and Best Original Song (for “Chim Chim Cher-ee”). They won three Grammy awards and received 24 gold and platinum albums and were inducted into the Songwriters Hall of Fame in 2005 and received the US National Medal of the Arts in 2008.

They also wrote the score on Broadway for Over Here.

The brothers were portrayed in the 2013 film Saving Mr. Banks, which told the story behind the making of Mary Poppins.

Sherman died of age-related illness at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Beverly Hills. His brother Robert died in 2012.

 

 

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Cabaret

My View: Jimmie Herrod….America’s Got Talent!

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Our table of four “judges” at 54 Below (Steven Reineke, Eric Gabbard, Storm Large, Eda Sorokoff) didn’t have a Golden Buzzer to ring for “America’s Got Talent” winner Jimmie Herrod last night, but we all gave this super singer a standing ovation and a thumbs up at the conclusion of his solo Cabaret debut in Broadway’s Supper Club.

Jimmie’s tonal dexterity, vocal chords that have no limits, and imaginative jazz interpretations of Broadway and Pop standards  thrilled a room full of music lovers.

Not everyone in America has talent, but Jimmie Herrod sure has!

From blowing the judges away as a finalist on “America’s Got Talent” to playing Angel in the symphonic version of Rent at The Kennedy Center, and touring the world as a member of Pink Martini, Jimmie shared his favorite songs and stories in an unforgettable intimate and personal show. 

Alex Boniello (Dear Evan Hansen, Deaf West Spring Awakening) was Jimmie’s special guest

About Jimmie Herrod

Jimmie is a vocalist who brings singular power an expressivity to his global career as a singer, songwriter, and entertainer on stage and screen. As a solo artist with a uniquely high vocal range, Jimmie has appeared to critical and audience acclaim multiple times with the National Symphony Orchestra at The Kennedy Center, including on the nationally broadcast “Joni Mitchell Songbook,” and alongside luminaries such as Renee Fleming and Raul Midon.

Recent appearances include solo debuts with the St. Louis, Nashville, and Houston Symphony Orchestras, starring alongside vocalist Storm Large in a weekend of concerts with the Oregon Symphony, and touring the globe as a member of the band Pink Martini.  Herrod first came to worldwide prominence as a finalist on the NBC nationally broadcast television show, “America’s Got Talent,” earning the rare “Golden Buzzer recognition from actress Sofia Vergara and returning the following year on the AGT All-Star series. IN 2024 Jimmie launches his first national tour as a solo artist, in support of his forthcoming full-length album.

JIMMIE HERROD, STEVEN REINEKE, The New York Pops, ERIC GABBARD

JIMMIE HERROD

JIMMIE HERROD

JIMMIE HERROD

JIMMIE HERROD

ALEX BONIELLO

JIMMIE HERROD & ALEX BONIELLO

STANDING OVATION

EDA SOROKOFF, STEVEN REINEKE, STORM LARGE, ERIC GABBARD

STORM LARGE & EDA SOROKOFF

STORM LARGE & STEPHEN SOROKOFF

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Cabaret

My View: Julie Wilson Honored By The Mabel Mercer Foundation at The Pierre Hotel

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Cabaret luminaries, supporters, and officers of The Mabel Mercer Foundation gathered at The Pierre Hotel last night to celebrate the100th anniversary of the birth year of cabaret legend Julie Wilson.  Julie’s dominant presence in the cabaret world over the many decades led her to be called “The Queen of Cabaret”. Cabaret’s current guiding light, KT Sullivan, the artistic director of The Mabel Mercer Foundation hosted the evening’s celebration which included a gourmet buffet followed by performances from some of cabaret’s most beloved artists and friends of Julie Wilson.  Entertaining the Gala audience of music connoisseurs and honoring the legacy of Julie Wilson were: Karen Akers, Carole J. Bufford, Melissa Errico, Jeff Harnar, Sue Matsuki, MOIPEI ( Mary, Maggy & Marta), Sidney Myer, Craig Rubano, KT Sullivan and Amra-Faye Wright…. John Weber (piano) and Steve Doyle (Bass).

An especially emotional moment of the evening was actor Holt McCallany (son of Julie Wilson) paying tribute to his mother and singing “I’m Becoming My Mother”.

HOLT McCALLANY (son of Julie Wilson)

KT SULLIVAN, artistic director The Mabel Mercer Foundation

KT SULLIVAN

CAROLE J. BUFFORD

CAROLE J. BUFFORD

MELISSA ERRICO

MELISSA ERRICO

JEFF HARNAR

JEFF HARNAR

SUE MATSUKI

SUE MATSUKI

CRAIG RUBANO

CRAIG RUBANO

KAREN AKERS

KAREN AKERS

SIDNEY MYER

SIDNEY MYER

AMRA-FAYE WRIGHT

AMRA-FAYE WRIGHT

HOLT McCALLANY

HOLT McCALLANY

HOLT McCALLANY (son of Julie Wilson)

MOIPEI

MOIPEI

PATRICK McENROE, KT SULLIVAN,MELISSA ERRICO,MOIPEI

HOLT McCALLANY & CAROLE J. BUFFORD

MOIPEI & HOLT McCALLANY

EDA SOROKOFF & ELIZABETH SULLIVAN (Happy 94th Birthday)

MELISSA ERRICO PATRICK McENROE, KT SULLIVAN

JEFF HARNAR & MOIPEI

HEATHER SULLIVAN, HOWARD MORGAN, Chairman of the board Mabel Mercer Foundation, ELANOR MORGAN

KT SULLIVAN, ELIZABETH SULLIVAN, HEATHER SULLIVAN,Dr. Patrick Sullivan

KT SULLIVAN

KT SULLIVAN, PETER HANSON, Linda Hanson

EDA SOROKOFF & CRHRISTEL IBSEN

MONAH GETTNER,KT SULLIVAN, ALAN GETTNER

BRIAN KALTNER, Board Member Mabel Mercer Foundation & DEBBIE DAMP

HOWARD MORGAN, KT SULLIVAN, CAROLE J. BUFFORD,MOIPEI, MATHEW INGE

PATRICK McENROE & MELISSA ERRICO

KT SULLIVAN & STEPHEN SOROKOFF

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Cabaret

My View: Why CAN’T A Woman…? This Woman Can…Lianne Marie Dobbs

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The actor Lianne Marie Dobbs played a 1900’s woman in the HBO series The Gilded Age. You also might have seen her in Law & Order, The Equalizer and F.B.I., but yesterday at Chelsea Tables + Stage she wasn’t just playing the part of a Cabaret singer!  Ms. Dobbs is the real deal, and she captivated an audience of music connoisseurs with her formidable vocal talents and wit in her show titled “Why CAN’T a Woman…? 

Lianne’s cabaret act utilizes Broadway leading men’s songs and sassy standards, served up with a twist of SHE, to celebrate all the hats that women wear, and she answered the shows question authoritatively….This woman sure can!

Lianne Marie Dobbs was named one of the Best Vocalists of the Decade (BroadwayWorld, 2020) and has filled The Green Room 42, 54Below, Feinstein’s at Hotel Carmichael, Feinstein’s at the Nikko, Blue Strawberry in St. Louis, and will be featured in Chicago’s Cabaret Week later in May.  “Why CAN’T a Woman…?” was named one of the best cabaret shows of the year (2022) by BroadwayWorld, and called “an honest to goodness emerging work of art”.  She has appeared in leading roles Off-Broadway, in National Tours, and at renowned theaters such as Denver Center, Repertory of St. Louis, Ogunquit Playhouse, Goodspeed and many more.

Ron Abel is Lianne’s music director and arranger, whose accolades include: LA Critics Circle Award Winner and L.A. Weekly Award Winner for his original compositions and unique arrangements of Broadway hits for orchestras and singers. He has been the music director for acclaimed vocalists such as Lucie Arnaz, Peter Allen, Joely Fisher, Valarie Pettiford, Julia Migenes, Helen Reddy, and John Lloyd Young.

LIANNE MARIE DOBBS & RON ABEL

LIANNE MARIE DOBBS & RON ABEL

LIANNE MARIE DOBBS

LIANNE MARIE DOBBS

LIANNE MARIE DOBBS

LIANNE MARIE DOBBS

LIANNE MARIE DOBBS & RON ABEL

LIANNE MARIE DOBBS & RON ABEL

CHELSEA TABLE + STAGE

CHELSEA TABLE + STAGE

STANDING OVATION

LIANNE MARIE DOBBS

LIANNE MARIE DOBBS & CAROLE J. BUFFORD

PAUL KREPPEL, RON ABEL, EDA SOROKOFF, MURPHY CROSS

EDA SOROKOFF & TAKAKO HARKNESS

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Columns

My View: An Evening With Jason Robert Brown…One Evening Isn’t Enough

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The 92NY Lyrics & Lyricists presented An Evening with Jason Robert Brown last night.  Although it would take many evenings to appreciate the totality and brilliance of the triple Tony Award winner’s body of work, Mr. Brown together with his exceptional band of musicians and guest artists Mykal Kilgore and Heidi Blickenstaff thrilled an overflow audience in it’s Kaufman Concert Hall during the 2 hour show.  In contrast to many great composer/lyricists who have minimal performance capabilities, JRB is an exciting personality on stage both vocally and conversationally, and his fearless technique on the piano is reminiscent of  George Gershwin or Marvin Hamlisch when playing their own works.

Full Disclosure:

I’ve been a JRB fan since my daughter Caroline in the 1980’s wrote us a letter from Camp French Woods saying..”I can’t wait for you to come on Visiting day and hear my friend Jason play the piano.

JASON ROBERT BROWN

JASON ROBERT BROWN

JASON ROBERT BROWN

JASON ROBERT BROWN

DANIELLE LEE GREAVES, TASHA MICHELLE, JASON ROBERT BROWN

MYKAL KILGORE

JASON ROBERT BORWN & MYKAL KILGORE

JASON ROBERT BORWN & MYKAL KILGORE

JASON ROBERT BROWN & MYKAL KILGORE

HEIDI BLICKENSTAFF

HEIDI BLICKENSTAFF

JASON ROBERT BROWN & HEIDI BLICKENSTAFF

JASON ROBERT BROWN & HEIDI BLICKENSTAFF

JASON ROBERT BROWN

HEIDI BLICKENSTAFF, JASON ROBERT BROWN, MYKAL KILGORE

AN EVENING WITH JASON ROBERT BROWN at 92NY

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